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Russia Suits

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NEWS
June 17, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lyudmila Rolshchikova was walking down the sidewalk near her home when a chunk of ice the size of a desktop fell seven stories, bounced off a porch roof and hit her in the head, killing her instantly. In itself, the death of the 52-year-old cleaning woman was not unusual--falling icicles claim an estimated 10 victims a year in Moscow. What is rare is that her family has gone to court to pin liability for her death on the workers who were supposed to remove the ice before it fell.
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NEWS
June 17, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lyudmila Rolshchikova was walking down the sidewalk near her home when a chunk of ice the size of a desktop fell seven stories, bounced off a porch roof and hit her in the head, killing her instantly. In itself, the death of the 52-year-old cleaning woman was not unusual--falling icicles claim an estimated 10 victims a year in Moscow. What is rare is that her family has gone to court to pin liability for her death on the workers who were supposed to remove the ice before it fell.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1996 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing a chapter in a scandal that cost one crony of Russian President Boris Yeltsin his Kremlin job, the Russian government said Friday that it has settled a lawsuit against a mysterious San Francisco firm it accused of stealing up to $171 million of the country's diamonds and precious metals.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1996 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing a chapter in a scandal that cost one crony of Russian President Boris Yeltsin his Kremlin job, the Russian government said Friday that it has settled a lawsuit against a mysterious San Francisco firm it accused of stealing up to $171 million of the country's diamonds and precious metals.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Told that their rashness had endangered Russia's unity, lawmakers caved in to enormous pressure from President Boris N. Yeltsin and agreed Friday to give their homeland not just one but two names: "Russian Federation" and "Russia." Less than 24 hours earlier, the Congress of People's Deputies had been swept by a nearly unanimous spasm of patriotic fervor that led members to choose only "Russia."
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