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BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia has weathered the world's financial crises as well as could be expected and will be allowed to resume borrowing from a $9-billion loan program, the International Monetary Fund's chief decided Thursday. But Managing Director Michel Camdessus warned that much remains unknown about the risks facing this and other emerging markets from the economic turmoil that has rocked Asia for the last few months. "I've come to tell Russia, 'You are doing the right thing, but . . .
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NEWS
July 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Sunday ordered a quintupling of most land taxes and vetoed two bills that would have lowered taxes on the profits of struggling industries, seeking to shore up his country's chances of getting final approval on a $22.6-billion international bailout.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stern voice of authority is speaking to Russia, ordering its businesses and citizens to forget five years of freewheeling economic chaos and start paying their taxes. If they ignore the voice's warning, they face a punishment unknown in the days of Soviet severity--bankruptcy. "Do you like it when your streets are clean? . . . Do you dislike it when crime surges? . . .
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Frustrated by parliamentary resistance, Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko ordered higher import taxes Saturday in an effort to raise new revenue and win Russia a $17.1-billion loan from the International Monetary Fund. "Unfortunately, the parliament didn't pass all the necessary measures," Kiriyenko said. "That means that we'll have to solve some of our problems . . . by decree."
BUSINESS
October 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bank Urges Russian Tax Reform: The system needs reform to prevent the budget deficit--blamed for the recent ruble crisis--from widening still further, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development said. The bank urged reforms in both Russia and other former Eastern bloc countries and chided European Union countries for hampering such reform by erecting trade barriers. Russia sharply reduced its budget deficit in 1993 and during the first half of 1994.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Russia's 60,000 tax inspectors are busy putting the squeeze on a record number of tax evaders and their efforts are being richly rewarded, the head of the country's State Tax Service said Wednesday. Igor N. Lazarev proudly told reporters that his service in 1991 alone brought in 10.6 billion rubles (about $118 million at the usual commercial exchange rate) in unpaid taxes, spending only 1.5 billion rubles ($17 million) to recover it.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | DAN MORAIN and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an unusual alliance that could place a major American think tank in the middle of the power struggle in the Soviet Union, the Hoover Institution plans to enter into an agreement to provide economic advice for Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin. The director of the conservative Hoover Institution, John Raisian, said the arrangement was proposed by Michail A.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris Fedorov, Russia's new chief tax collector, seems to enjoy making people nervous. He likes to talk of putting celebrities in handcuffs and of dragging rich people off to jail. Since taking the job in late May, he has ordered a prominent member of parliament to pay back taxes and has threatened to collect $1 billion more from foreign businesspeople. He has joined tax police on a raid of a vodka warehouse and lectured sidewalk vendors about keeping proper records of their sales.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Frustrated by parliamentary resistance, Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko ordered higher import taxes Saturday in an effort to raise new revenue and win Russia a $17.1-billion loan from the International Monetary Fund. "Unfortunately, the parliament didn't pass all the necessary measures," Kiriyenko said. "That means that we'll have to solve some of our problems . . . by decree."
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin fired Russia's top tax official Friday for failing to collect billions owed by some of the country's wealthiest companies, and he put the debtors on notice that they face property confiscation or closure unless they settle their arrears. Though his actions amounted more to a gesture of irritation than to serious intervention in Russia's financial crisis, the moves impressed Western lenders and investors.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris Fedorov, Russia's new chief tax collector, seems to enjoy making people nervous. He likes to talk of putting celebrities in handcuffs and of dragging rich people off to jail. Since taking the job in late May, he has ordered a prominent member of parliament to pay back taxes and has threatened to collect $1 billion more from foreign businesspeople. He has joined tax police on a raid of a vodka warehouse and lectured sidewalk vendors about keeping proper records of their sales.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
Russia's government on Thursday launched a new attack on tax cheats by starting at the very top--with Gazprom, the country's largest company, biggest tax debtor and perhaps its most sacred cash cow. Lawmakers immediately objected to seizing the monopoly's assets, denouncing the move as an effort to destroy one of the country's remaining economic treasures. But the government scored a victory when Gazprom agreed to make regular tax payments.
NEWS
May 30, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin fired Russia's top tax official Friday for failing to collect billions owed by some of the country's wealthiest companies, and he put the debtors on notice that they face property confiscation or closure unless they settle their arrears. Though his actions amounted more to a gesture of irritation than to serious intervention in Russia's financial crisis, the moves impressed Western lenders and investors.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Softly, softly, Russia's newly lovable tax man is coming. Cuddly, with kind eyes, he looks at first-time taxpayers from the cover of a booklet on how to fill out the form correctly, saying cheerfully, "Don't be afraid!" Up to 5 million of the leaflets, filled with cartoons and reassuring explanations, are being distributed to mailboxes in mostly urban areas of Russia.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia has weathered the world's financial crises as well as could be expected and will be allowed to resume borrowing from a $9-billion loan program, the International Monetary Fund's chief decided Thursday. But Managing Director Michel Camdessus warned that much remains unknown about the risks facing this and other emerging markets from the economic turmoil that has rocked Asia for the last few months. "I've come to tell Russia, 'You are doing the right thing, but . . .
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under heavy lobbying from Russia's new government of economic liberals, the Communist-dominated legislature Thursday gave a preliminary nod to a drastically simplified tax code that aims to boost private business and stimulate economic growth. President Boris N.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under heavy lobbying from Russia's new government of economic liberals, the Communist-dominated legislature Thursday gave a preliminary nod to a drastically simplified tax code that aims to boost private business and stimulate economic growth. President Boris N.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life in the New Russia is hard on Yelena Vorsina. Her monthly salary--the equivalent of $122--is three months overdue, and last payday she received only $40. Adding to her misery, she must cough up 12% of her meager income in taxes. She and her co-workers threatened to strike but realized they would be severely punished. Instead, she planted vegetables to feed her family. "It is impossible to live, but what can you do?" asked the 35-year-old mother of two.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life in the New Russia is hard on Yelena Vorsina. Her monthly salary--the equivalent of $122--is three months overdue, and last payday she received only $40. Adding to her misery, she must cough up 12% of her meager income in taxes. She and her co-workers threatened to strike but realized they would be severely punished. Instead, she planted vegetables to feed her family. "It is impossible to live, but what can you do?" asked the 35-year-old mother of two.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stern voice of authority is speaking to Russia, ordering its businesses and citizens to forget five years of freewheeling economic chaos and start paying their taxes. If they ignore the voice's warning, they face a punishment unknown in the days of Soviet severity--bankruptcy. "Do you like it when your streets are clean? . . . Do you dislike it when crime surges? . . .
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