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BUSINESS
May 22, 1995 | From Associated Press
The end of the Cold War is helping to revolutionize air travel between North America and Asia. With the gradual opening up of the Russian Far East, and the easing of tension on the Sino-Russian border, airlines will shortly be flying over areas that were once militarily sensitive and off-limits to foreign aircraft. Previously, planes flying from North America to Asian destinations such as Beijing, Shanghai or Hong Kong had to skirt Russian territory.
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NEWS
September 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The leaders of Japan and Russia pledged to press on toward a peace treaty despite failing to resolve a territorial dispute that has blocked a pact for more than five decades. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori ended two days of talks in Tokyo without progress over claims to four islands off northern Japan that Russia seized at the end of World War II. The islands are known as the Kurils in Russia and the Northern Territories in Japan.
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NEWS
October 13, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving to heal a valued neighbor's historic wounds, apologized Tuesday for the cruel treatment and deaths of Japanese prisoners in his country after World War II and agreed that a dispute over four small islands Moscow seized from Japan must be resolved.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | Associated Press
Russia's coast guard fired on a Japanese fishing boat within Japan's northern waters Friday and then took the boat into Russian waters, government officials in Tokyo said. No one was reported hurt in the incident, which Japan said happened about 150 miles south of a group of disputed islands seized by Soviet forces at the end of World War II. Both sides claim historical ownership of the islands, which Tokyo calls the Northern Territories.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a tiny island at the confluence of the swollen Volga and Kama rivers stands a white pavilion built a century ago in tribute to Ivan the Terrible's 1552 conquest of independent Tataria. "When I was little, I used to dream of blowing up that monument, which seemed to me to glorify the Russian penchant to repress us," recalls Tatar nationalist leader Marat A. Mulyukov.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The leaders of Japan and Russia pledged to press on toward a peace treaty despite failing to resolve a territorial dispute that has blocked a pact for more than five decades. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori ended two days of talks in Tokyo without progress over claims to four islands off northern Japan that Russia seized at the end of World War II. The islands are known as the Kurils in Russia and the Northern Territories in Japan.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's visit to Japan beginning Sept. 13 will test whether Russia can become a "partner" of the Group of Seven advanced industrialized democracies, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa declared here Sunday. Speaking to a seminar of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, Miyazawa said Japan, the United States, Canada, Germany, Britain, France and Italy agreed at the Munich summit in July that "we want Russia to be our partner."
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush offered a $645-million increase in American assistance to the former Soviet republics Wednesday, but Japan said that it will not provide more help until it settles a territorial dispute with Moscow left over from World War II. Opening a 47-nation conference on aid to the former Soviet Union, Bush called on the world community to show the newly independent states that it "cares about them and supports their hard struggle to build new societies on the ruins of communism."
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Russia deployed heavily armed troops to its southern Caucasus flank Sunday to halt a new outbreak of ethnic warfare. Several people were killed and scores taken hostage before a tentative cease-fire was called, reports said. Ingush and Ossetian forces began fighting Friday in North Ossetia, a territory along Russia's southern border with Georgia. Ingush militants in the region are demanding control of part of the Ossetian territory.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin abruptly canceled his impending visit to Japan, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other officials scrambled Thursday to put the best face on the diplomatic debacle, while public opinion was split over whom to blame. Miyazawa urged his country to "wait patiently" for Russia to sort out its domestic problems, while Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe urged people to "keep a cool head" and not respond in an "exaggerated way."
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Reuters
The upper house of Russia's parliament Thursday publicly laid claim to Ukraine's Black Sea naval port of Sevastopol, saying it was part of Russia and Kiev had no legal right to govern it. The Federation Council, in a move likely to cause a storm of protest in Kiev and further worsen mistrustful relations between the two governments, endorsed the demand that Ukraine surrender the city by a majority of 110 to 14.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long day of bossing around burly truck drivers at the Chelnya lumberyard, Lyubov N. Matveyeva has only to turn on the faucet to see that local industry produces more than paychecks. Black smoke from incinerated logging scraps, toxic residues from paper mills and untreated sewage from logging camps conspired through decades of breakneck Communist development to contaminate the water table throughout the Republic of Karelia on the Finnish border in Russia's northwestern tip.
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets of this remote Siberian city perched on permafrost are not paved with gold, but its long-neglected inhabitants say they should be. The Republic of Yakutia is the hard-currency engine of Russia's economy, the heart of its lucrative diamond industry, a wellspring of oil, the mother lode of its staggering riches of gold, platinum, copper and other metals.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a tiny island at the confluence of the swollen Volga and Kama rivers stands a white pavilion built a century ago in tribute to Ivan the Terrible's 1552 conquest of independent Tataria. "When I was little, I used to dream of blowing up that monument, which seemed to me to glorify the Russian penchant to repress us," recalls Tatar nationalist leader Marat A. Mulyukov.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1995 | From Associated Press
The end of the Cold War is helping to revolutionize air travel between North America and Asia. With the gradual opening up of the Russian Far East, and the easing of tension on the Sino-Russian border, airlines will shortly be flying over areas that were once militarily sensitive and off-limits to foreign aircraft. Previously, planes flying from North America to Asian destinations such as Beijing, Shanghai or Hong Kong had to skirt Russian territory.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women in Chuvashia, a normally placid republic in Russia's Volga River heartland, fume publicly that President Boris N. Yeltsin should be shot for sending boys to perish in Chechnya. The republic's chief spokesman calls Yeltsin "a mangy dog." Chuvashia's president warns that the separatists here are gaining ground with every soldier's corpse sent home for burial.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Facing a rising storm in his government and legislature over a scheduled trip to Tokyo, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday abruptly called off the visit, dashing Japanese hopes for a rapid return of territories seized 47 years ago by the Red Army. The suddenness of Yeltsin's decision left Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe reeling from a "big shock," Japan's NHK Television network reported.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he flew to the Tokyo summit Wednesday night, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin left an ominous new trend mounting at home: moves among the sprawling federation's regions to grab added power from Moscow and upgrade themselves to full-fledged Russian republics.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost six weeks of savage fighting, the Russian flag now flies triumphant over the captured presidential palace in Grozny. But if history is any guide, the Kremlin's problems with the proud, embittered and vengeful Chechen people are far from over. For at least seven centuries, this tiny, fierce and often persecuted people have defined themselves by the struggle against one foreign invader after another.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pro-Russian opposition leaders in the north Caucasian republic of Chechnya announced Tuesday that they had toppled President Dzhokar Dudayev, the fierce former Soviet air force general who has been a thorn in Moscow's side since he declared his tiny Muslim republic to be independent from Russia in 1991. Dudayev, however, appeared to be firmly in control at least in the Chechen capital, Grozny.
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