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January 5, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Foreign Trade Surplus Up 29%: The country's trade surplus with countries outside the former Soviet Union last year rose to $20 billion from $15.6 billion in 1993, the Interfax news agency said. The agency quoted the Ministry for Foreign Economic Relations as saying that 1994 foreign trade turnover rose 7% to more than $76 billion. It gave no figure for 1993.
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WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Paul Richter and Henry Chu
WASHINGTON - The U.S. and Russian presidents imposed sanctions on each other's top aides and other government officials Thursday as the dispute over Crimea intensified and the White House worried publicly that Moscow might be positioning its military to seize more of Ukraine. Denouncing Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama said the Treasury Department would freeze any U.S. assets of 20 prominent Russians - including several officials close to President Vladimir Putin, some of the country's wealthiest businessmen - and a Moscow bank that gives financial support to the Russian leadership.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost every day, Mikhail Gura and his partner, Eugene Kalakoutski, go on a shopping spree. They buy cars by the dozen, cigarettes by the carload, vodka by the liter and ship the goods to their home base in Moscow. Even before the sedans or cigarettes reach their homeland, the products already are claimed by private Russian companies and that nation's new class of wealthy entrepreneurs.
WORLD
July 19, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The hottest video rental in this beachside resort town isn't some action-packed Hollywood blockbuster, but "Brigada," a Russian miniseries about a bunch of army buddies who form an organized crime syndicate before they're rubbed out by a group of younger, more unscrupulous rivals. The Russian influence here is also visible in shop signs using the Cyrillic alphabet and Russian flags hanging outside stores just down the street from Starbucks. "We've had good relations with the Russians for a long time," said Nikos Andreo, a 57-year-old wine grower in Limassol.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin took over most of the Soviet Union's gold and diamond mining on Friday to help finance a program of radical economic reforms, then suspended oil exports to ensure enough fuel for the winter.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials said Wednesday that the worldwide drop in oil prices threatens to impede the country's fragile economic recovery by cheapening one of its major exports, but they will not cut oil production in an attempt to drive prices back up. "We suffer greatly from the drop in oil prices," acting Deputy Prime Minister Boris Y. Nemtsov told reporters at the close of a meeting of energy ministers of eight major industrialized nations here to discuss international cooperation on energy issues.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Sees No Grain Imports Next Year: A bumper grain harvest in 1993 means Russia will not need to import grain next year, Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zaveryukha told Russian television. Zaveryukha, who is responsible for agriculture, said the grain harvest will be between 115 million and 120 million metric tons and that this year's imports will be restricted to feed grain and oil seed meal under a humanitarian contract already signed with the United States.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Exports and imports of Russian caviar--fish eggs coveted as one of the world's finest delicacies--will be severely limited under a measure adopted Wednesday by the world's environmental leaders that expands a global treaty on endangered species. In a unanimous move, officials meeting in Zimbabwe to revise the pact added all varieties of sturgeon, the major source of caviar, to the list of animals and plants for which commercial sales are restricted.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nuclear engineer Nikolai N. Frolov has a grand plan to solve the energy problems of the future: a fleet of floating nuclear power stations that could bring electricity to any part of the world accessible by ship. From the Arctic to the Indian Ocean, dozens of atomic energy plants--all owned by Russia--could be anchored offshore, docked in harbors or even towed upriver to deliver abundant supplies of power.
WORLD
May 22, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Russia signed a landmark trade agreement with the European Union on Friday in a deal that President Vladimir V. Putin said will encourage Russia to "speed up" consideration of the Kyoto global warming treaty.
WORLD
August 24, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of Georgia accused Russia of bombing his nation Friday and killing one person, in an escalation of long-running tensions between the neighbors. Russian military officials shrugged off the protest by President Eduard A. Shevardnadze, denying the incident and claiming that the Georgians probably dropped the bombs themselves--although Russian helicopters and planes have bombarded the country in the past. Georgian officials said the airstrike early Friday also wounded five people.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Frustrated by parliamentary resistance, Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko ordered higher import taxes Saturday in an effort to raise new revenue and win Russia a $17.1-billion loan from the International Monetary Fund. "Unfortunately, the parliament didn't pass all the necessary measures," Kiriyenko said. "That means that we'll have to solve some of our problems . . . by decree."
BUSINESS
April 2, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials said Wednesday that the worldwide drop in oil prices threatens to impede the country's fragile economic recovery by cheapening one of its major exports, but they will not cut oil production in an attempt to drive prices back up. "We suffer greatly from the drop in oil prices," acting Deputy Prime Minister Boris Y. Nemtsov told reporters at the close of a meeting of energy ministers of eight major industrialized nations here to discuss international cooperation on energy issues.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nuclear engineer Nikolai N. Frolov has a grand plan to solve the energy problems of the future: a fleet of floating nuclear power stations that could bring electricity to any part of the world accessible by ship. From the Arctic to the Indian Ocean, dozens of atomic energy plants--all owned by Russia--could be anchored offshore, docked in harbors or even towed upriver to deliver abundant supplies of power.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore escaped domestic campaign-financing controversies with a four-day visit to Russia only to be confronted Monday with trouble in one of Washington's most important foreign relationships over such vital issues as nuclear safety, human rights and the Mir space station. During the first day of talks on U.S.-Russian relations, Gore conveyed to Russian Prime Minister Viktor S.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Frustrated by parliamentary resistance, Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko ordered higher import taxes Saturday in an effort to raise new revenue and win Russia a $17.1-billion loan from the International Monetary Fund. "Unfortunately, the parliament didn't pass all the necessary measures," Kiriyenko said. "That means that we'll have to solve some of our problems . . . by decree."
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Swords into plowshares" may be the lofty motto of disarmament advocates now that the Cold War frost has melted, but "guns into greenbacks" is closer to the truth in Russia. Despite a glut in the global arms market, Russia expects to export at least 50% more weaponry this year than last, and it is looking to this trade boom to finance a revival of its bankrupt defense plants.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Exports and imports of Russian caviar--fish eggs coveted as one of the world's finest delicacies--will be severely limited under a measure adopted Wednesday by the world's environmental leaders that expands a global treaty on endangered species. In a unanimous move, officials meeting in Zimbabwe to revise the pact added all varieties of sturgeon, the major source of caviar, to the list of animals and plants for which commercial sales are restricted.
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