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NEWS
May 23, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The road to Anna Tsvetkova's house meanders two miles down a deeply rutted dirt track, sometimes vanishing into the vast, marshy, muddy morass that is Russia in springtime. Cars and trucks are no match for the devouring muck; only the clumpy wheel prints of heavy Soviet tractors show where the road once lay. A sturdy villager with good rubber boots can make the two-mile trek in less than an hour. But the nearest doctor is 11 miles away.
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NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
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NEWS
May 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking coal miners lifted a 10-day-old blockade of the Trans-Siberian and other vital railroads Sunday after the government promised to pay some overdue wages. But the breakthrough probably provided only a short pause in a disruptive clash over how to handle looming mine closures.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the frozen Siberian wilderness, there lies an untapped territory so abundant in natural resources that Russian officials proclaim it the richest region on Earth. Someday, they say, a monumental rail line--a second Trans-Siberian Railway--will haul minerals and timber from this hinterland and make Russia wealthy. The dream of exploiting this fortune dates back to the czars.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the likely relief of 5,500 motorists every hour, highway crews Wednesday finished nearly a year of improvements on the Moscow Ring Automobile Highway, making an outing on that infamous 65-mile "road of death" somewhat easier to survive. "I feel safer driving now," said Mikhail Y. Klimichev, a 23-year-old trucker hauling a container of furniture along the Russian capital's busiest highway. "To me it looks pretty much like an American interstate that you see sometimes on television."
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the frozen Siberian wilderness, there lies an untapped territory so abundant in natural resources that Russian officials proclaim it the richest region on Earth. Someday, they say, a monumental rail line--a second Trans-Siberian Railway--will haul minerals and timber from this hinterland and make Russia wealthy. The dream of exploiting this fortune dates back to the czars.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | CHRYSTYNA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A severe fuel shortage has crippled the provision of basic goods and services throughout Ukraine as the government of this fledgling country grapples with erratic deliveries of oil from its neighbor and sole supplier, Russia. About 40,000 Kiev residents could not buy bread earlier this week after the city's transport service failed to deliver 11 1/2 tons of bread to stores because of the fuel shortage.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevdokia Kaluziga's wrinkled face tightens with a wistful smile as she recalls the thriving market half a century ago for her hand-sewn leather moccasins and gaiters made of elk fur. Today, laments the 79-year-old widow, the indigenous Udege people who once fished, trapped and hunted the pristine watershed of the Bikin River have little money and less use for the togs of their bygone traditions.
NEWS
April 30, 2006 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
A dacha -- the Russian country house, the quintessential weekend escape -- can be as modest as a wooden shack without heat or running water, or as lavish as a villa with meticulously landscaped grounds. Introducing another kind of country house: a dacha on wheels.
SPORTS
December 22, 1991 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passengers disembarking from USAir Flight 2164 Saturday morning at Lindbergh Field had to wonder what was causing such a commotion. A flood of cameras, reporters and a handful of America's Cup officials had waited over an hour for the flight that would carry crewmen from the Age of Russia, one of two Russian syndicates vying for a chance to compete in the world's premier regatta starting in January. But that wasn't nearly as long as the Age of Russia entourage had been waiting to get here.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the likely relief of 5,500 motorists every hour, highway crews Wednesday finished nearly a year of improvements on the Moscow Ring Automobile Highway, making an outing on that infamous 65-mile "road of death" somewhat easier to survive. "I feel safer driving now," said Mikhail Y. Klimichev, a 23-year-old trucker hauling a container of furniture along the Russian capital's busiest highway. "To me it looks pretty much like an American interstate that you see sometimes on television."
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The road to Anna Tsvetkova's house meanders two miles down a deeply rutted dirt track, sometimes vanishing into the vast, marshy, muddy morass that is Russia in springtime. Cars and trucks are no match for the devouring muck; only the clumpy wheel prints of heavy Soviet tractors show where the road once lay. A sturdy villager with good rubber boots can make the two-mile trek in less than an hour. But the nearest doctor is 11 miles away.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | CHRYSTYNA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A severe fuel shortage has crippled the provision of basic goods and services throughout Ukraine as the government of this fledgling country grapples with erratic deliveries of oil from its neighbor and sole supplier, Russia. About 40,000 Kiev residents could not buy bread earlier this week after the city's transport service failed to deliver 11 1/2 tons of bread to stores because of the fuel shortage.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A few years ago, this spindly island that Russia wears like a holstered gun on its eastern hip was as close to nowhere as anyone could imagine. Eight time zones from Moscow, Sakhalin Island was best known for the day in 1983 when a South Korean airliner strayed too close to a top-secret Soviet military installation and got shot out of the sky. Playwright Anton Chekhov had a one-word description when he visited in 1890: "Hell."
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