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NEWS
August 28, 1991
Russia, Kirghizia and Kazakhstan are discussing an accord that would bind them together economically. Here's what they have to offer: KIRGHIZIA Size: 76,460 square miles Population: 4.3 million Capital: Frunze Kirghizia is famed for livestock breeding. It raises sufficient wheat for its own use plus sugar beets, grapes and rice. It has more than 500 large, modern industrial enterprises including sugar refineries, tanneries, cotton and flour mills, oil and mining enterprises.
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WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
[Updated, 8 p.m., March 3: WASHINGTON - CIA director John Brennan told a senior lawmaker Monday that a 1997 treaty between Russia and Ukraine allows up to 25,000 Russia troops in the vital Crimea region, so Russia may not consider its recent troop movements to be an invasion, U.S. officials said. The number of Russian troops that have surged into Ukraine in recent days remains well below that threshold, Brennan said, according to U.S. officials who declined to be named in describing private discussions and declined to name the legislator.
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NEWS
November 1, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lower house of the Russian parliament voted overwhelmingly Friday to ratify an international treaty that bans the manufacture and storage of chemical weapons and commits Russia to destroying its huge stockpile--the world's largest--over the next decade. By joining more than 80 other nations in ratifying the Chemical Weapons Convention, Russia will be agreeing to dispose of 40,000 tons of chemical weapons.
WORLD
July 24, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration's arms reduction treaty with Russia, which for months seemed headed for swift approval in the Senate, is suddenly facing delays that some supporters fear could threaten its survival. With skeptical Senate Republicans demanding more information and more time for debate, the New START treaty may not be approved until after the midterm elections in November. It could even slide into next year and a new Congress — which may include more Senate Republicans hostile to it. A failure to pass the treaty, which would lower the maximum number of long-distance warheads deployed by each of the former Cold War foes to 1,550 from 2,200, would be a major blow to President Obama's efforts to improve relations with Russia and would also dim the outlook for a series of other arms accords.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia agreed Wednesday to negotiate with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on a new East-West charter but renewed its determined opposition to the alliance's plans to extend membership to some of Moscow's Cold War allies. Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny M.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's breakaway republics were asked on Wednesday to form a new economic union designed to accelerate the development of a free-market economy and pull the country out of its deepening crisis. Grigory A.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | Reuters
About 30,000 Communists and their allies marched in the center of the Belarussian capital Sunday to support hard-line President Alexander G. Lukashenko's plan to sign a "treaty of union" with Russia. The rally was carefully organized and advertised on state television, in contrast to a nationalist rally last week--dismissed by Lukashenko as "a gathering of drunken hoodlums"--during which police confronted and occasionally beat marchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1996
Two weeks ago the House leadership hastily, and with some embarrassment, canceled floor debate on a measure calling for an antimissile system that would protect all 50 states and be deployed by the year 2003. The action followed release of a Congressional Budget Office report putting the eventual cost of the Republican-sponsored plan at up to $60 billion, about 12 times as much as the legislation's backers had estimated.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
[Updated, 8 p.m., March 3: WASHINGTON - CIA director John Brennan told a senior lawmaker Monday that a 1997 treaty between Russia and Ukraine allows up to 25,000 Russia troops in the vital Crimea region, so Russia may not consider its recent troop movements to be an invasion, U.S. officials said. The number of Russian troops that have surged into Ukraine in recent days remains well below that threshold, Brennan said, according to U.S. officials who declined to be named in describing private discussions and declined to name the legislator.
WORLD
July 24, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration's arms reduction treaty with Russia, which for months seemed headed for swift approval in the Senate, is suddenly facing delays that some supporters fear could threaten its survival. With skeptical Senate Republicans demanding more information and more time for debate, the New START treaty may not be approved until after the midterm elections in November. It could even slide into next year and a new Congress — which may include more Senate Republicans hostile to it. A failure to pass the treaty, which would lower the maximum number of long-distance warheads deployed by each of the former Cold War foes to 1,550 from 2,200, would be a major blow to President Obama's efforts to improve relations with Russia and would also dim the outlook for a series of other arms accords.
WORLD
April 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. and Russian negotiators held a "productive" initial round of talks in Rome aimed at securing a new treaty to curb nuclear weapons, they said, as part of a broader effort to improve relations. Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. assistant secretary of State for verification and compliance, said the meeting "got off to a fast start." Her Russian counterpart, Anatoly Antonov, said Moscow would do its "utmost" to prepare a new draft treaty by year-end.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lower house of the Russian parliament voted overwhelmingly Friday to ratify an international treaty that bans the manufacture and storage of chemical weapons and commits Russia to destroying its huge stockpile--the world's largest--over the next decade. By joining more than 80 other nations in ratifying the Chemical Weapons Convention, Russia will be agreeing to dispose of 40,000 tons of chemical weapons.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia agreed Wednesday to negotiate with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on a new East-West charter but renewed its determined opposition to the alliance's plans to extend membership to some of Moscow's Cold War allies. Russian Foreign Minister Yevgeny M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1996
Two weeks ago the House leadership hastily, and with some embarrassment, canceled floor debate on a measure calling for an antimissile system that would protect all 50 states and be deployed by the year 2003. The action followed release of a Congressional Budget Office report putting the eventual cost of the Republican-sponsored plan at up to $60 billion, about 12 times as much as the legislation's backers had estimated.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | Reuters
About 30,000 Communists and their allies marched in the center of the Belarussian capital Sunday to support hard-line President Alexander G. Lukashenko's plan to sign a "treaty of union" with Russia. The rally was carefully organized and advertised on state television, in contrast to a nationalist rally last week--dismissed by Lukashenko as "a gathering of drunken hoodlums"--during which police confronted and occasionally beat marchers.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, arriving for make-or-break arms control talks, said Sunday that there is "a better than 50-50 chance" that the United States and Russia will sign a treaty cutting nuclear arsenals by more than two-thirds before President Bush leaves office. Eagleburger negotiates today with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei A. Kozyrev and Defense Minister Pavel S.
WORLD
April 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. and Russian negotiators held a "productive" initial round of talks in Rome aimed at securing a new treaty to curb nuclear weapons, they said, as part of a broader effort to improve relations. Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. assistant secretary of State for verification and compliance, said the meeting "got off to a fast start." Her Russian counterpart, Anatoly Antonov, said Moscow would do its "utmost" to prepare a new draft treaty by year-end.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, arriving for make-or-break arms control talks, said Sunday that there is "a better than 50-50 chance" that the United States and Russia will sign a treaty cutting nuclear arsenals by more than two-thirds before President Bush leaves office. Eagleburger negotiates today with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei A. Kozyrev and Defense Minister Pavel S.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's breakaway republics were asked on Wednesday to form a new economic union designed to accelerate the development of a free-market economy and pull the country out of its deepening crisis. Grigory A.
NEWS
August 28, 1991
Russia, Kirghizia and Kazakhstan are discussing an accord that would bind them together economically. Here's what they have to offer: KIRGHIZIA Size: 76,460 square miles Population: 4.3 million Capital: Frunze Kirghizia is famed for livestock breeding. It raises sufficient wheat for its own use plus sugar beets, grapes and rice. It has more than 500 large, modern industrial enterprises including sugar refineries, tanneries, cotton and flour mills, oil and mining enterprises.
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