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NEWS
November 26, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Larisa Medunova visited a fabric factory recently to ask women workers to support her candidacy for the new Russian Parliament, they replied, "Just who do you think you are?" The taunting question, which in Russian is literally, "Where are you climbing?" is usually put to people who cut in front of comrades in line, stick their noses into other people's business or try to tackle problems deemed beyond their ken.
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NEWS
February 11, 2007 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
Dressed in black, Vladimir Rakovsky glides around with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lighted room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men.
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NEWS
June 26, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her broad face red and sweaty, her stubby blond pigtails bouncing wildly, Marina Bosenko, 39, jumped and kicked her way through the hourlong exercise class, keeping her eyes fixed on her instructor's trim body. "I want to be pretty," she said during a pause, "and to look good so I won't have complexes. I want to be able to wear short skirts instead of special clothes for heavy women. I want to look like Natasha." Her role model, exercise teacher Natasha Yakosheva, understood perfectly.
SPORTS
March 5, 2001 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She did it once, but she won't be doing it again. Those were Elana Paramonova's feelings after running--and winning--her second marathon in two weeks in the 16th Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday. Paramonova, a 38-year-old mother of one and born and raised in the Ural Mountains in Russia, had clocked a career best of 2 hours 32 minutes 55 seconds to win the Motorola Marathon in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 18.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glass breaking, overturning furniture, muffled thuds. A woman screaming from a downstairs apartment: "I'm being killed! I'm being killed!" It's midnight, and three floors up, in a cozy kitchen with a kettle on the boil and pipes gurgling behind the curtains, neighbor Tania Kucherenko shrugs off any suggestion that she should call the police. "It's the same every Saturday night. The husband comes home drunk and beats her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Love for sale. Svetlana Novikova knew it could be a lucrative business. In St. Petersburg, the foreign men who rented apartments through her real estate business relentlessly hounded her to introduce them to her girlfriends. So four years ago, the entrepreneurial Novikova established Svetlana Agency, a Russian mail-order-bride service. She was so successful, she expanded her business recently into one of the more financially fertile U.S. neighborhoods--Newport Beach.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To celebrate her daughter's eighth birthday, Svetlana Fateyeva bought a big bottle of grain alcohol to share with her co-workers. By midnight that night, Fateyeva was flat on her bare stomach, tied to a bed with cloth strips, sobbing and railing about missing her party. The cake that never made it home was locked in custody with her clothes and purse. "Because my child is 8 years old, I have to walk around naked?"
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the voice of Lyudmila Vinnikova, single mother of an only child, the anger and resentment of millions echoed off the Kremlin walls on Wednesday as she observed International Women's Day by denouncing the holiday as a Soviet leftover and a patronizing farce. "The government doesn't listen to women at all," complained Vinnikova, whose 20-year-old son, Yuri, has been sent to fight in the hated war against breakaway Chechnya.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, protesters banged empty pots and pans. This year, said organizers of the anti-government rally to mark International Women's Day, almost no one could spare the pots to dent. But they came anyway, about 1,000 women and men, to turn what used to be a homey holiday akin to Mother's Day, with flowers given and festive dinners consumed, into one more weapon in Russia's political battles. And Russian President Boris N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Love for sale. Svetlana Novikova knew it could be a lucrative business. In St. Petersburg, the foreign men who rented apartments through her real estate business in St. Petersburg relentlessly hounded her to introduce them to her girlfriends. So four years ago, the entrepreneurial Novikova established Svetlana Agency, a Russian mail order bride service. She was so successful that she recently expanded her business into one of the more financially fertile U.S. neighborhoods--Newport Beach.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States team has been steaming along at the Holiday Cup women's water polo tournament at the Los Alamitos Armed Forces Reserve Center and Thursday night was no exception. The Americans got goals from nine players and easily defeated Russia, 13-7. If they can do this in Sydney this fall at the Olympics, well. . . gold medal talk was overheard in a few corners of the aquatic facility as the crowd of 1,150 filed out. "I'm happy with where we are," U.S. Coach Guy Baker said.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruslan S. Aushev, president of the Russian republic of Ingushetia, says he doesn't need a second bride, because his wife has already given him a male heir. But that shouldn't keep other men from taking additional wives, he says, and so he signed a decree last month legalizing the practice of polygyny--that would be multiple wives, of course, not husbands--in his southern Islamic republic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Love for sale. Svetlana Novikova knew it could be a lucrative business. In St. Petersburg, the foreign men who rented apartments through her real estate business relentlessly hounded her to introduce them to her girlfriends. So four years ago, the entrepreneurial Novikova established Svetlana Agency, a Russian mail-order-bride service. She was so successful, she expanded her business recently into one of the more financially fertile U.S. neighborhoods--Newport Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Love for sale. Svetlana Novikova knew it could be a lucrative business. In St. Petersburg, the foreign men who rented apartments through her real estate business in St. Petersburg relentlessly hounded her to introduce them to her girlfriends. So four years ago, the entrepreneurial Novikova established Svetlana Agency, a Russian mail order bride service. She was so successful that she recently expanded her business into one of the more financially fertile U.S. neighborhoods--Newport Beach.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glass breaking, overturning furniture, muffled thuds. A woman screaming from a downstairs apartment: "I'm being killed! I'm being killed!" It's midnight, and three floors up, in a cozy kitchen with a kettle on the boil and pipes gurgling behind the curtains, neighbor Tania Kucherenko shrugs off any suggestion that she should call the police. "It's the same every Saturday night. The husband comes home drunk and beats her.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country where real women don't drive and a milkmaid remains the ideal of the working female, Irina Khakamada and Galina Starovoitova are breaking the molds. Influential women in politics can be counted on virtually one hand in Russia, where patriarchal tradition and resentment of Communist-era tokenism have combined to create a power structure that is almost exclusively male.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruslan S. Aushev, president of the Russian republic of Ingushetia, says he doesn't need a second bride, because his wife has already given him a male heir. But that shouldn't keep other men from taking additional wives, he says, and so he signed a decree last month legalizing the practice of polygyny--that would be multiple wives, of course, not husbands--in his southern Islamic republic.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lyudmila Zakharevich, 16, tops her class at an elite Moscow high school, but instead of planning a career, she dreams of becoming a full-time housewife. Lena Guzeeva, 22, on the other hand, desperately wants a professional position in one of the new private businesses in her central Russian city but worries that sexual exploitation has become so accepted that she will be jobless unless she agrees to submit to a potential employer's advances.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1996 | LYNN BERRY, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
A lovely Russian woman tries on a sporty Italian mink jacket and smiles as she swirls in front of the mirror. Then she hangs up the fur and walks away. Too costly? No, just not quite the right size. "Three thousand [dollars] is not expensive--of course not," says Irina Vronkevich, a 27-year-old former model who stopped working when she married a Russian businessman. Vronkevich is among a growing number of Russian women who drape themselves in furs for the long winter.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yulia wanted work as an accountant. So she pulled on a tight green miniskirt, squeezed into saucy high heels and pranced onto the stage of a hotel ballroom one recent night, batting her lashes and swinging her hips as she tried to win a job balancing books. Nearby danced Valeria, hopeful of landing a managerial post. Also Irina, in body-hugging white, her law school courses all but forgotten as she flirted behind a cat-eye mask and dreamed of finding secretarial work. Music boomed.
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