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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was only their second full day in the U.S, but the Russian exchange students were undaunted by their task ? putting on a show about Sept. 11 for a group at the California Institute of the Arts that included many native New Yorkers. Any doubts among the Americans that the Russians could play an American tragedy quickly gave way to tears. The show, with the exception of Fedor Malyshev's closing monologue by a boy whose father was killed in the attack, was in Russian, but "you could understand what was going on, through the movement, through the gestures," explained Tatiana Williams, a 24-year-old theater undergraduate at CalArts in Valencia.
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WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
More than two decades of building foreign investor confidence in Russia as a reliable business partner -- over. Reliable customers in Western Europe for the oil and gas exports on which Russia's economy is heavily dependent -- now in doubt. Rising prices for imported food, clothing, cars and financing of private and government building projects -- a given. The costs to Russia of its internationally condemned seizure of Ukraine's Crimean peninsula extend far beyond the symbolic sanctions adopted in Washington and Brussels a day after Crimeans, under armed Russian occupation, voted to secede from Ukraine and appealed for induction into the Russian Federation.
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SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A crew of Mongolian gerbils may have gone where no Mongolian gerbil has gone before, but they did not come back alive. A Russian spacecraft filled with mice, lizards and other animals has returned to Earth -- but with the majority of its furred passengers apparently dead. The Bion-M experiment, launched from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, on April 19, carried 45 mice, 15 geckos, 18 Mongolian gerbils, 20 snails and a number of different plants, seeds and microorganisms, according to a Russian state news site .  About half of the mice died, but the lizards reportedly survived.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Planetary scientists weren't remotely expecting the 62-foot-wide Chelyabinsk fireball to shoot across Russian skies in February  -- they'd had their eyes peeled on a much bigger target that missed the Earth by a decent margin, the asteroid 2012 DA14. But this relatively modest, unseen space rock caused a shock wave that shattered countless windows in the city and injured more than a thousand people. It was the largest asteroid impact on land in more than a century. Researchers are now saying that such impacts, from relatively small asteroids just tens of yards long, might be 10 times more common than we'd thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Vladimir Arnold, a Russian mathematician who pioneered work on the arcane field known as catastrophe theory and whose work on the KAM theory led to a better understanding of the motion of planets in the solar system and a host of other applications, died of peritonitis in Paris on June 3. He was 72. He "was one of the most eminent contemporary mathematicians from all points of view," according to a statement from the Russian Academy of Sciences....
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian scientists have been ordered to report all professional contacts with foreigners in a move apparently aimed at reimposing Soviet-style controls on science, a prominent human rights campaigner said Thursday.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Planetary scientists weren't remotely expecting the 62-foot-wide Chelyabinsk fireball to shoot across Russian skies in February  -- they'd had their eyes peeled on a much bigger target that missed the Earth by a decent margin, the asteroid 2012 DA14. But this relatively modest, unseen space rock caused a shock wave that shattered countless windows in the city and injured more than a thousand people. It was the largest asteroid impact on land in more than a century. Researchers are now saying that such impacts, from relatively small asteroids just tens of yards long, might be 10 times more common than we'd thought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Yegor Gaidar, a Russian economist thrust by the Soviet collapse into the thankless task of molding a plausible free market from the wreckage of communism, died at his home early Wednesday. He was 53. The economist died unexpectedly of a blood clot while working on a book, an aide told reporters. Though he had mostly faded from public life in recent years, Gaidar remained a familiar and fraught presence in the Russian consciousness. He was widely associated with the raucous instability and vanishing life savings that plagued the country's transformation to a free-market economy in the 1990s.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
More than two decades of building foreign investor confidence in Russia as a reliable business partner -- over. Reliable customers in Western Europe for the oil and gas exports on which Russia's economy is heavily dependent -- now in doubt. Rising prices for imported food, clothing, cars and financing of private and government building projects -- a given. The costs to Russia of its internationally condemned seizure of Ukraine's Crimean peninsula extend far beyond the symbolic sanctions adopted in Washington and Brussels a day after Crimeans, under armed Russian occupation, voted to secede from Ukraine and appealed for induction into the Russian Federation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1996
Andrei Safirov, a professor of Russian history and political science at the Russian Academy of Science in Moscow, will give two free public lectures this week. Safirov will speak at 6:30 tonight on "20th Century Russia in the Light of Historical Perspectives and the Future Course of Russia." The lecture will be at Golden West College's theater, 15744 Golden West St. At 7 p.m. Thursday, Safirov will speak on the same topic at UCI's Social Ecology Building, Room 112. Information: (714) 536-5555.
SCIENCE
May 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A crew of Mongolian gerbils may have gone where no Mongolian gerbil has gone before, but they did not come back alive. A Russian spacecraft filled with mice, lizards and other animals has returned to Earth -- but with the majority of its furred passengers apparently dead. The Bion-M experiment, launched from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, on April 19, carried 45 mice, 15 geckos, 18 Mongolian gerbils, 20 snails and a number of different plants, seeds and microorganisms, according to a Russian state news site .  About half of the mice died, but the lizards reportedly survived.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It was only their second full day in the U.S, but the Russian exchange students were undaunted by their task ? putting on a show about Sept. 11 for a group at the California Institute of the Arts that included many native New Yorkers. Any doubts among the Americans that the Russians could play an American tragedy quickly gave way to tears. The show, with the exception of Fedor Malyshev's closing monologue by a boy whose father was killed in the attack, was in Russian, but "you could understand what was going on, through the movement, through the gestures," explained Tatiana Williams, a 24-year-old theater undergraduate at CalArts in Valencia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Vladimir Arnold, a Russian mathematician who pioneered work on the arcane field known as catastrophe theory and whose work on the KAM theory led to a better understanding of the motion of planets in the solar system and a host of other applications, died of peritonitis in Paris on June 3. He was 72. He "was one of the most eminent contemporary mathematicians from all points of view," according to a statement from the Russian Academy of Sciences....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Yegor Gaidar, a Russian economist thrust by the Soviet collapse into the thankless task of molding a plausible free market from the wreckage of communism, died at his home early Wednesday. He was 53. The economist died unexpectedly of a blood clot while working on a book, an aide told reporters. Though he had mostly faded from public life in recent years, Gaidar remained a familiar and fraught presence in the Russian consciousness. He was widely associated with the raucous instability and vanishing life savings that plagued the country's transformation to a free-market economy in the 1990s.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian scientists have been ordered to report all professional contacts with foreigners in a move apparently aimed at reimposing Soviet-style controls on science, a prominent human rights campaigner said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO and JOHN CANALIS and LISA ADDISON
A former Kremlin advisor will speak about the dramatic ongoing transformation of the former Soviet Union next month at Golden West College. Andrei Safirov, a researcher on international politics and Russian-American relations, will share his insights about the changes in his country. Currently on sabbatical from the Russian Academy of Sciences, Safirov advised former Kremlin leaders on President Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to the Soviet Union.
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