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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1993 | AARON CURTISS
After New Year's, Thanksgiving is Ark Kivman's favorite holiday: a quintessentially American celebration of culinary indulgences and caloric excesses that has no parallel in his Russian homeland. But as much as the owner of the Moscow Nights nightclub in Studio City savors the traditional turkey and stuffing and cranberry sauce, everything goes better with borsht. "It's an American holiday," Kivman said. "We celebrate it the same way Americans do--big turkey with a lot of vodka."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
I don't speak a word of Russian. But I've come to believe some sort of strange symbiosis exists between the language of Tolstoy and the language of Shakespeare. Russia gave birth to that master of English-language prose named Vladimir Nabokov. Half a century later, another writer who grew up with Cyrillic characters is gleefully writing American English as vivid, original and funny as any that contemporary U.S. literature has to offer. That writer is Gary Shteyngart, who wrote three excellent novels propelled by his ecstatic voice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local Russian American leaders lambasted the media and law enforcement officials Thursday, accusing them of perpetuating the myth that immigrants from the former Soviet Union are involved in a "Russian Mafia," and arguing that there is no evidence of such a group. Heads of emigre groups criticized media outlets for stereotyping Russians as members of organized crime in the coverage of last week's arrest of Ukrainian-born Mikail Markhasev in the slaying of Ennis Cosby.
SPORTS
March 28, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Timothy Goebel's second-place finish at the World Figure Skating Championships was sealed when he hurt his hip last fall. He overcame the injury but couldn't overcome the odd conventions of the sport, no matter that he performed a sparkling long program that brought the crowd of 10,059 at the MCI Center to its feet Thursday in a flag-waving frenzy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1991 | T. H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly on theater for Valley/Westside Calendar
The more the walls break down between East and West, it's amazing how similar the scenery is on both sides. Now that we can take a closer look at Russia, maybe we can see ourselves better. That's one of the reasons for the latest cultural trade between the two countries, a production called "The Russian Connection," which opens Oct. 20 at Hollywood's Heliotrope Theatre.
SPORTS
February 24, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The president of the U.S. Olympic Committee accused Russia's top Olympic official Saturday of waging an "anti-American" campaign in a string of protests over results at the Winter Games. Vitaly Smirnov, an International Olympic Committee executive board member, was upset by a poorer-than-expected medals showing by Russia's athletes and turned his displeasure to the host country, USOC President Sandy Baldwin said from Salt Lake City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if we were all alike? Would that put a stop to quarrels and fights? A new animated family adventure, "People," explores the tricky question of diversity with some global diversity of its own: The film, four years in the making, is a collaboration between an American production company and a Russian animation studio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993 | MIMI KO
A delegation of Russian artists, businessmen and officials visiting Orange this week on an exchange program said they were pleasantly surprised at the kindness, warmth and openness of the people in the United States. One visitor, Vladimir M. Chernov, mayor of Novo Kosino, a suburb of Moscow, said he was amazed at how courteous and receptive people are.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Everyone knows that art can never be all things to all people. Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, a pair of Russian emigre artists who have worked together for more than 20 years, deliver the next best thing: art that contains the highest number of popular elements for the majority of people, as determined by a poll of a cross-section of U.S. citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1994
Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the most controversial of all the Russian emigre writers of the Cold War, has gone home. His departure from the Vermont retreat where he had worked in virtual solitude for 18 years made quiet news. Noisier was the rapidly developing story of organized crime in Russia and its alarming attempt to gain access to the Russian nuclear arsenal.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Expedition Six, as the three-person crew on the international space station is called, arrived by shuttle in November and is scheduled to stay until March. There are enough supplies aboard to last until June, shuttle program manager Ron Dittemore said. In addition, Russia launched a previously scheduled supply vessel Sunday with a load of scientific equipment, fuel, food and mail for the crew. It is scheduled to arrive Tuesday.
WORLD
January 21, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
It was an outcome soaked in irony: The American who executed a coup two years ago to give the Kremlin control over a leading independent television network suffered the same fate -- apparently having proved insufficiently compliant toward President Vladimir V. Putin and members of the Kremlin "family." But the sudden dismissal of Russian American Boris Jordan as director of Gazprom-Media may not have been a clear-cut issue of freedom of speech, media experts here say.
SPORTS
February 24, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The president of the U.S. Olympic Committee accused Russia's top Olympic official Saturday of waging an "anti-American" campaign in a string of protests over results at the Winter Games. Vitaly Smirnov, an International Olympic Committee executive board member, was upset by a poorer-than-expected medals showing by Russia's athletes and turned his displeasure to the host country, USOC President Sandy Baldwin said from Salt Lake City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Port of Long Beach, in the belly of a gleaming 667-foot vessel bristling with radar dishes and transmission towers, American and Russian scientists are building a powerful Ukrainian rocket. Sometime in the next month or so, the rocket and its payload, a communications satellite, will be hoisted onto a massive floating launch platform.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
Shortly before President Kennedy was assassinated, the Soviet Embassy in Washington received a letter from Lee Harvey Oswald--a letter the Soviets privately believed was forged to make it look as if Oswald was working for them, newly released documents show.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marking a milestone in space exploration and international cooperation, U.S. and Russian space officials Saturday unveiled the first completed segment of the new International Space Station designed to replace Russia's aging Mir. Paid for primarily by the United States but built in Russia, the module will be a central component of the future space station and provide a crucial link between Russian and American segments as they are added on in space.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | TIM RUTTEN, Rutten is a Times staff writer.
The two most interesting volumes to be plucked from this season's crop of art books are not in the conventional sense books about art. One of them is, in fact, about gardening; the other is what amounts to the first official English-language survey of the Russian Orthodox Church's incomparable iconographic heritage. Though their publishers clearly intended something more serious, both books have the additional virtue of suggesting useful reflections on two significant movements in contemporary life.
NEWS
June 1, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delegation of U.S. senators Tuesday sought to defuse anti-American sentiment by proposing that joint military exercises, which were to be conducted in Russia, take place instead on U.S. soil. The United States and Russia agreed in September to the maneuvers, with both governments billing the exercise as a dry run for possible future peacekeeping operations. The drill was to take place in July at the Totsk testing ground in the Ural Mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local Russian American leaders lambasted the media and law enforcement officials Thursday, accusing them of perpetuating the myth that immigrants from the former Soviet Union are involved in a "Russian Mafia," and arguing that there is no evidence of such a group. Heads of emigre groups criticized media outlets for stereotyping Russians as members of organized crime in the coverage of last week's arrest of Ukrainian-born Mikail Markhasev in the slaying of Ennis Cosby.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if we were all alike? Would that put a stop to quarrels and fights? A new animated family adventure, "People," explores the tricky question of diversity with some global diversity of its own: The film, four years in the making, is a collaboration between an American production company and a Russian animation studio.
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