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December 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Prices for Russian works of art set a series of new records at auctions in London this week. Christie's and Sotheby's both reported hectic bidding dominated by Russian collectors seeking their own national heirlooms. Two Christie's sales of paintings and works of art fetched a total of $23.6 million, while Sotheby's sale totaled $18 million. Top price of the sales went to Ivan Aivazovsky's "St. Isaac's on a Frosty Day," which was purchased for $2.
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WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament on Wednesday approved an amnesty law that could allow two jailed members of the punk music group Pussy Riot to go free and pardon 30 people facing charges over a Greenpeace protest against Arctic oil drilling. But human rights activists complained that the bill unanimously approved by the State Duma, or lower house, is too narrow and will free only 2,000 to 5,000 inmates when it takes effect this week. The amnesty was seen as an attempt to deflect criticism of Russia's human rights record ahead of the Olympic Winter Games, which will take place in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Radical Russian art suppressed in the Stalinist era and kept hidden from the Soviet public for more than half a century will once again be shown to the Russian people. This fall the State Russian Museum at Leningrad will unveil an encyclopedic exhibition of some 500 works of avant-garde art of the '20s and '30s made by nearly 160 artists including such legendary figures as Wassily Kandinsky, Kasimir Malevich, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Vladimir Tatlin and El Lissitzky.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A collection of treasures from pianist Van Cliburn brought in $4.3 million at a New York City auction. More than 150 items that Cliburn collected as mementos while playing concerts around the world -- including Russian art, English furnishings, jewelry and silver -- went on the Christie's auction block Thursday. The sale's premier piece was a pair of George II giltwood mirrors attributed to Mathias Lock -- expected to fetch between $150,000 and $250,000 -- sold for $460,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998 | MASSIE RITSCH
As a tie-in to its ongoing exhibit of Faberge objects, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library will present a lecture Tuesday by noted author and Russian scholar Suzanne Massie. Massie will speak at 11 a.m. about Russian art and culture. Tickets are $15 and can be reserved by calling 522-2977. Massie has 30 years of experience traveling, studying and working in the former Soviet Union and in today's Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The first collection of 19th-Century Russian paintings to be exhibited outside the Soviet Union will be displayed at the Dallas Museum of Art starting in October, museum officials said. "This exhibition will forever change our idea of Russia and our idea of 19th-Century art," said Richard Brettel, museum director. "These are sweeping masterpieces, some better than anything done by the American or French Impressionists."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Many Russian job descriptions have changed radically since the former Soviet Union was dismantled. Alexander D. Borovsky's has become infinitely more interesting. As chief curator of contemporary art for the Russian Museum in St. Petersburg, he is charged with building a collection of art that was officially ignored for several decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2008 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON -- From Russia, with qualms. Works by Matisse, Van Gogh, Cezanne and other masterpieces from Russian museums are finally hanging in a London gallery after a last-minute legal change eased Moscow's fears that the paintings could be seized in legal action if they traveled to Britain. The Royal Academy of Arts' blockbuster exhibition "From Russia" gathers 120 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works -- many seized by the Soviet state after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On some levels, the halls of the Kavli Theater make for a less-than-perfect venue for art viewing. The building is not an ideal gallery setting--the lighting could be better, and the viewing hours are erratic at best. In fact, viewing art here can retroactively stir up the controversy over the scrapped plans for an art gallery to be fitted into the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Center's design in the first place.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | M.C. McPHILLIPS
The handsome, dark-haired woman replaced an intricately enameled Faberge egg in its case and turned with more interest to the panel paintings that covered the walls of her Irvine home. "We Russians, we believe that icon is living God image," Svetlana Nenov said, inspecting a golden-hued portrait of a resurrected Christ. Scanning the surrounding paintings--an assortment of religious figures rendered in deep, intense hues--her almond-shaped eyes registered obvious satisfaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For more than a year, Russia has prohibited its government-run museums from sending artworks to exhibitions in the United States. The ban has frustrated and puzzled American museum officials, because it was spurred by a legal decision unrelated to anything the museums themselves have done. Diplomacy has failed to lift it. Hopes have risen recently that the impasse can be broken by a bipartisan bill that passed unopposed in the U.S. House of Representativeson March 19 and is pending in the Senate judiciary committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Zona A Book About a Film About a Journey to a Room Geoff Dyer Pantheon: 230 pp., $24 Imagine going to the movies but, for one reason or another, you can't see or hear anything on-screen. Fortunately, you can still experience the film with the help of a friend tugging on your sleeve excitedly and guiding you through the movie by describing what they see and hear, and, for added color, what it means. How much you'd gain from that experience would depend on your level of patience, certainly, but also on the quality of the film and your friend's abilities.
WORLD
March 25, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
She was an unlikely bandit, one of hundreds of middle-aged, down-at-the-heel curators who shuffle through the former czarist palaces of the State Hermitage Museum. But quietly, steadily, Larisa Zavadskaya was brewing a scandal that would shake the art world from New York to Paris. She stuffed her purse with hundreds of pieces of jewelry, icons and silverware, later farming them out to antiques dealers. The thefts came to light in 2005 when inspectors arrived to inventory her department.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2008 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON -- From Russia, with qualms. Works by Matisse, Van Gogh, Cezanne and other masterpieces from Russian museums are finally hanging in a London gallery after a last-minute legal change eased Moscow's fears that the paintings could be seized in legal action if they traveled to Britain. The Royal Academy of Arts' blockbuster exhibition "From Russia" gathers 120 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works -- many seized by the Soviet state after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Russia said Thursday that Britain had failed to provide sufficient protection from private legal claims for a major exhibition of paintings owned by Russian museums, and that it wouldn't loan the works until it received further guarantees. The statement from Russia's federal culture agency came in response to a British government claim that it had assured Russia that the French and Russian masterpieces would be protected under British law.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Esa-Pekka Salonen picked up a microphone just before beginning the second half of his Los Angeles Philharmonic program dealing with Stalin's noxious specter on Soviet music. "You've probably noticed by now," he said to the audience at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday night, "that this is music by three young, wild guys." Yes, and angry and aggressive and noisy and wacky guys. And libidinous. And, at least in the case of Shostakovich, out to get noticed and in trouble, which he did.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | DAVID MAZIE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
In May, 1945, after the war with Germany ended, Viktor Baldin, a Soviet army lieutenant, was summoned to a manor house 50 miles north of Berlin. Hundreds of drawings, sketches and prints had been discovered in a basement room, and Baldin, an architect, was regarded by his comrades as an expert in fine art. What the 25-year-old officer saw was a treasure-trove of pieces by giants of European painting: Rembrandt, Durer, van Gogh, Goya, Rubens, Titian, Cezanne, Degas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last symphony that Mstislav Rostropovich conducted in Moscow before leaving on what turned into 16 years of exile was Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6, the "Pathetique." On Tuesday, the "Pathetique" was the first symphony he conducted at the start of the National Symphony Orchestra's appearances in Moscow and Leningrad. The symmetry was Rostropovich's way of saying that he had kept faith, cultural as well as political, during those long years abroad and that he was anxious to pick up, as best he could, where he had left off. "These past 16 years that we were in the West . . . we have been true soldiers of our Russian art, Russian music," he said on his return this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2005 | Steve Karnowski, Associated Press
Amid the din of power saws, hammering and sanding, a new home is taking shape in a former church for a stereotype-shattering museum, the only one in North America dedicated to Russian art from the Soviet era. The Museum of Russian Art, founded in 2002 by art dealer Raymond E. Johnson, is scheduled to reopen May 9 in the former Mayflower Church in southern Minneapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Prices for Russian works of art set a series of new records at auctions in London this week. Christie's and Sotheby's both reported hectic bidding dominated by Russian collectors seeking their own national heirlooms. Two Christie's sales of paintings and works of art fetched a total of $23.6 million, while Sotheby's sale totaled $18 million. Top price of the sales went to Ivan Aivazovsky's "St. Isaac's on a Frosty Day," which was purchased for $2.
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