Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussian Jews
IN THE NEWS

Russian Jews

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors strolling the sidewalks of the Tamarack Woods Apartments are likely to encounter a melange of unusual smells. There is the spicy aroma of kotlely , a delectable dish made of ground meat. Or the sweet-smelling fragrance of pirozhky , a doughy baked concoction filled with meat, apples, cabbage and potatoes. "It smells like something I've never smelled before," said Pamela Marrocco, manager of the apartment complex.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 24, 2013
Re "Israel needs a new map," Opinion, March 21 Ian S. Lustick suggests that early Israeli Zionist goal of building a "modern secular democracy" that would eventually exist in an Arab region that had also become modern and secular hasn't been met. Anyone who studies the history of Israel knows that it was built by the exigencies of political brutality, not a plan. The Russian Jews escaping the pogroms and the European Jews escaping Hitler had only one plan in mind: survival.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
WORLD
November 11, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Unique not only in its high-tech content but also in its political importance, a museum of Jewish history and culture opened to the public Sunday in Moscow, the capital of a nation beset by anti-Semitism for more than two centuries. Several hundred visitors filed into the more than 90,000-square-foot former bus garage and found themselves immersed in a lesson in tolerance. "The opening of such a museum in Moscow is a qualitatively new stage of Jewish life in Russia," said Alexander Boroda, president of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Russia.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its super-coach cruiser panting at the curb behind them, the group filing into the Wilshire Boulevard Temple on a Sunday morning is standard tourist issue: mostly married couples on the far side of 40, whom time has weathered and widened nearly identically, and women friends in pairs or trios clutching oversized handbags, their hair a range of the softening autumnal hues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight-year-old Julie Kuzinits blew softly at the flames that danced atop the Hanukkah menorah, her palms held out gingerly to catch the heat. Watching her with bemusement at the Jewish Federation campus here Sunday, Emily Kuzinits smiled a mother's smile. These were all small bits of Jewish custom: a brightly lit menorah, a small top--or "dreidle"--dotted with Hebrew letters, a chocolate coin wrapped in gold foil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1992
I truly feel sorry for the gays and lesbians in the former Soviet Union. That any nation would commit such atrocities in this modern era is unthinkable. But what should our priorities be? The people as a whole, starving through a harsh winter and faced with a runaway inflation? A nuclear arsenal in unaccountable hands? Russian Jews? Russian gays? I'm sure we all want a fair and equitable future for the people of the new commonwealth, but let's get through the winter without everyone blowing up first.
NEWS
February 27, 1987
In a show of international solidarity, members of B'nai B'rith gathered in Los Angeles and Orange counties to protest the Soviet government's policy of refusing Russian Jews the right to emigrate. The rallies were two of several gatherings held throughout California, the United States and 43 other countries to put pressure on the Soviet Union for the release of more Jews.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | From Associated Press
William R. Perl, the founder of the Washington, D.C., branch of the Jewish Defense League and the organizer of the smuggling of thousands of Jews out of Nazi-occupied Europe in the late 1930s and 1940s, died Thursday. He was 92. Perl died at his home in Beltsville, Md. He had Parkinson's disease. Perl also was a retired Army lieutenant colonel, a psychologist, a Holocaust survivor and a champion of the right of Russian Jews to emigrate.
OPINION
April 15, 1990
Your editorial ("Poland Aims to Make a Point," March 27) saluted Poland's offer to fly Russian Jews to Israel. But at the same time, it implied that Poland was responsible for what happened to the Jews at the hands of Nazi and Communist occupiers. The people of Poland had nothing to do with the Nazis or the Communists or the governments imposed on them. The Nazis killed 3 million Christian Poles and the Communists killed and imprisoned hundreds of thousands more. My family's suffering was typical for many Christian families in Poland.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | Bill Desowitz, Special to The Times
One of the lesser known stories of World War II that only recently has gained wider recognition is how Shanghai became a haven for Jews fleeing persecution in Nazi Germany in the late 1930s. As the fascinating documentary "Shanghai Ghetto" explains, the city was an open port where no visa was required, in part because the occupying Japanese simply didn't want the responsibility. Shanghai was China's commercial center -- exotic, decadent, affluent but also riddled with poverty.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 2002 | Susan Baskin, Susan Baskin last wrote for the magazine about breast cancer.
When I was 12, my aunt screamed at me across the kitchen table: "You're a Jew. No matter what you say, what you do, you're a Jew. And they won't let you forget it." I remember my parents, seated across from my aunt, saying nothing to refute her charge. This was my fate, their silence said. I was a Jew. And I hated it. What happened in my parents' kitchen that night corroborated feelings that had been spawned years earlier.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | ROBERT WELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like most Americans, Kimberly Grigsby wanted to do something to help after Sept. 11. The answer came two weeks later when she was handed the script to a musical version of "The Immigrant," the story of a Russian Jew who fled oppression and tried to make a living by selling bananas in rural Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's such a local favorite that hardly a year goes by without somebody staging "Fiddler on the Roof" in Ventura County. This year's edition, presented by the Cabrillo Music Theatre, is of the high quality that's come to be expected from the group. Those (if there are any) unfamiliar with the show need know only that it's the story of Tevye, a poor dairyman in the predominantly Jewish Russian village of Anatevka, circa 1905.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | From the Washington Post
When Alla Volodarskiy arrived in the United States, she tried to brighten the Brooklyn apartment she and her husband, Yefim, rented for $730 a month by sweeping out the cockroaches and placing rugs over the finger-sized cracks in the floor. But frustration flooded the thoughts of this retired professional couple, who consolidated nearly six decades of memories into four suitcases to move from the former Soviet Union to the United States as refugees in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1993
The ADL is dismayed that so many Russians cast their vote for the outspoken extremist and anti-Semite, Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Zhirinovsky's animus toward Jews is well-documented. His xenophobic vision of a "Russia for Russians" and his embracing of German neo-Nazis must be forcefully denounced by President Boris Yeltsin and all proponents of democracy inside and outside of Russia. Zhirinovsky will most likely attempt to appear more moderate as time goes on. However, it should not be forgotten that the Jewish minority is one of his primary targets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1995 | BETH KNOBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Moscow's lone matzo bakery closed last autumn, it looked as if Russian Jews might lack the sacred flat bread necessary for Passover, the Jewish holiday of freedom. But thanks to the efforts of a Los Angeles-based Jewish organization and a host of local merchants, Russian Jews will have everything they need--from matzo balls to gefilte fish--for the holiday, which begins at sundown today.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its super-coach cruiser panting at the curb behind them, the group filing into the Wilshire Boulevard Temple on a Sunday morning is standard tourist issue: mostly married couples on the far side of 40, whom time has weathered and widened nearly identically, and women friends in pairs or trios clutching oversized handbags, their hair a range of the softening autumnal hues.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, Mark Levit had good reason to want to leave Russia. As a Jew, he had seen a promising scientific career derailed by blatant anti-Semitism. As a believer in democracy, he had been ill-served by Soviet communism. And as a talented mathematician and computer scientist, he surely had the credentials to find good work in the West. But Levit saw hope where others saw only a country in ruins.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|