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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British publishing tycoon Robert Maxwell launched an Israeli Russian-language weekly newspaper, Vremya, produced by Soviet Jewish emigres. Maxwell said he hopes eventually to circulate the newspaper in Moscow. The Vremya staff, which has been publishing a daily Russian-language page in the Hebrew newspaper Maariv, is made up of Russian Jews who emigrated to Israel. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated former dissident, is chairman of the editorial board.
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OPINION
March 13, 2014 | By Robert English
It's become popular to dismiss Russian President Vladimir Putin as paranoid and out of touch with reality. But his denunciation of "neofascist extremists" within the movement that toppled the old Ukrainian government, and in the ranks of the new one, is worth heeding. The empowerment of extreme Ukrainian nationalists is no less a menace to the country's future than Putin's maneuvers in Crimea. These are odious people with a repugnant ideology. Take the Svoboda party, which gained five key positions in the new Ukrainian government, including deputy prime minister, minister of defense and prosecutor general.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Kenneth Katzner, 72, a leading expert on the Russian language, died of congestive heart failure due to cancer on May 25 in Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C, Katzner grew up in Forest Hills, N.Y. He graduated from Cornell University and served in the U.S. Air Force. After receiving intensive Russian language training at the Syracuse University Language Program, Katzner was posted in England as a communications intelligence officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Kenneth Katzner, 72, a leading expert on the Russian language, died of congestive heart failure due to cancer on May 25 in Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, D.C, Katzner grew up in Forest Hills, N.Y. He graduated from Cornell University and served in the U.S. Air Force. After receiving intensive Russian language training at the Syracuse University Language Program, Katzner was posted in England as a communications intelligence officer.
NEWS
August 21, 1989
Moldavian nationalists threatened to go on strike unless their mother tongue replaces Russian as the Soviet republic's official language. At an outdoor meeting in Kishnev, the capital, attended by several thousand people, speakers from the Moldavian Popular Front said a draft law protecting their language had been watered down and would be of little benefit. They demanded that the republic's Parliament, when it meets Aug. 29, modify the law to deny any official status to the Russian language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994
Want to hear a City Council meeting in Russian? Da? OK, check out West Hollywood, reputedly the first municipality in the country to televise a live, Russian-language "simulcast" of its regular, biweekly City Council meeting. The borscht bureaucracy, so to speak, will be available on Mondays starting at 7 p.m. on the city's information channel, 6. Russian immigrants make up more than a third of West Hollywood's population of 37,000, according to city officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1989 | Leslie Wolf, Times Staff Writer
Ewa Moore, born in Warsaw and educated in Moscow, finds Vista a little strange at times. For one thing, the weather's always warm. And the neighbors in the apartment complex seem to be moving in and out all the time--they just don't stay put like in the old country. But living here does have its good points, the 30-year-old Russian language instructor concedes. There's certainly no shortage of work. It seems like everybody these days wants to learn to speak Russian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's black and white and green all over? Smaller than a breadbasket. And in Russia, this hot item--made right here in the Valley--sells for five bucks on the black market. One more clue, you beg? It's full of life--hopes, ambitions, struggle, love--but it has never been alive. Meet "We and America," a Russian language monthly newspaper just 3 years old and getting bigger each year. Its audience is Russian-language readers, particularly newcomers who are trying to make a go of it here.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997 | Steve Hochman
You'd think the Walt Disney Co. had covered all the bases when it comes to marketing animated movie musicals. But 20th Century Fox thinks it has a few new tricks to try out with "Anastasia." And in the process, senior vice president of Fox Music Robert Kraft is hoping that he can help the story of the exiled Romanoff princess, which opens Nov. 21, touch both country music and Latin pop fans.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | ANGELA CHARLTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three years ago, Leonid Kuchma spoke only Russian in public and could barely form a sentence in Ukrainian. Now, as Ukraine's president, he speaks only Ukrainian. At least, he tries to. "He speaks 'Kuchmese,' a kind of Ukrainian with Russian words thrown in when he can't think of the translation," complains Olena Timoshenko, a language instructor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
West Hollywood city officials, in an attempt to bridge a cultural gap between the Russian immigrant community and police, will conduct a seminar in Russian about American-style law enforcement. On Thursday, representatives of the Sheriff's Department's West Hollywood station will explain the tenets of policing as part of an ongoing lecture series.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny P. Chelyshev's life and work is the study of Russia's rich literary language, the language of Aleksandr Pushkin. Every June 6 he joins other devotees by a statue in Moscow's Pushkin Square to remember the 19th century poet's birthday. Towering over the busy square from the wall of an office building is a new billboard that makes Chelyshev cringe. In huge, blue letters of the Latin alphabet, it reads: SAMSUNG.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"It's like having Shakespeare come back to teach you," said a student who spent the afternoon studying Russian poetry with Yevgeny Yevtushenko. "It's like studying physics with Einstein." The poet himself, one of the great survivors of Russia's Communist era, doesn't put it that grandly.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prof. Yevgeny Sheryaev never wants to see another article about a konsensis reached at a sammit between two sooper-star politicians. As deputy director of the Russian Language Institute, Sheryaev has tracked, with mounting incredulity, the scores of American words that have infiltrated everyday Russian speech since then-Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev introduced perestroika and glasnost to the English lexicon seven years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's black and white and green all over? Smaller than a breadbasket. And in Russia, this hot item--made right here in the Valley--sells for five bucks on the black market. One more clue, you beg? It's full of life--hopes, ambitions, struggle, love--but it has never been alive. Meet "We and America," a Russian language monthly newspaper just 3 years old and getting bigger each year. Its audience is Russian-language readers, particularly newcomers who are trying to make a go of it here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1994
Want to hear a City Council meeting in Russian? Da? OK, check out West Hollywood, reputedly the first municipality in the country to televise a live, Russian-language "simulcast" of its regular, biweekly City Council meeting. The borscht bureaucracy, so to speak, will be available on Mondays starting at 7 p.m. on the city's information channel, 6. Russian immigrants make up more than a third of West Hollywood's population of 37,000, according to city officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have common roots, but the two waves of Russian immigrants are separated by a lifetime. One group came to the United States to escape czarist pogroms or Soviet rule in the early 1900s, then raised families here. The other fled Soviet anti-Semitism over the last two decades.
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