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WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament on Wednesday approved an amnesty law that could allow two jailed members of the punk music group Pussy Riot to go free and pardon 30 people facing charges over a Greenpeace protest against Arctic oil drilling. But human rights activists complained that the bill unanimously approved by the State Duma, or lower house, is too narrow and will free only 2,000 to 5,000 inmates when it takes effect this week. The amnesty was seen as an attempt to deflect criticism of Russia's human rights record ahead of the Olympic Winter Games, which will take place in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
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WORLD
April 12, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin has massed tens of thousands of troops along Ukraine's eastern border, a reminder of his vow to protect ethnic Russians in the neighboring country. Using his army, however, is probably Plan B. Rather than repeating the "Crimean scenario" - invading, seizing and annexing territory - the Kremlin would prefer to keep Ukraine weak and divided by forcing a change in how it is governed, analysts say. Increasing regional autonomy at the expense of the central government would force Ukrainian authorities to constantly balance competing visions of the country to hold it together, and in effect give Moscow veto power through its influence among ethnic Russians in the east.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1994
Regarding the debate over children born to immigrants, as a former Russian lawyer, I suggest a curious comparison. If a child is born to Russian parents in America, he is a citizen of the United States. This is American law. If a child is born to American parents in Russia, he is not a citizen of Russia. Why? Because according to American law, he is still a citizen of the United States. This is Russian law. Isn't it a reason why a lot of Russians live in the United States, and no Americans in Russia?
WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - It has been a good week for Russian President Vladimir Putin - at the end of a pretty good year. Russia's parliament approved an amnesty law Wednesday that is likely to result in freedom for two jailed members of the punk music group Pussy Riot, and for 30 people facing charges over a Greenpeace protest against Arctic oil drilling. The move appears to take off the table two high-profile cases that could sour the atmosphere for the Olympic Winter Games, which Putin will host in February.
WORLD
March 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
The United States has turned over seven Russian citizens who were being held at the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, American and Russian officials said Monday. Deputy chief prosecutor Sergei Fridinsky said Russian authorities have charged the men with illegally crossing borders, mercenary activity and participating in a criminal group, the Interfax news agency reported. They were captured in Afghanistan and accused of fighting alongside the Taliban.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1985 | Richard Buffum
Are you puzzled over why dealing with the Russians can be so bewildering and frustrating? We seem to think differently. I got a strong glimmering of why the other day. I learned from Marshall Wilson Houts that to understand the Russians, you must understand their law which greatly differs from ours. Their attitude toward law is intricately related to their attitudes toward treaties and contracts.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian diplomat who struck and killed a woman in Ottawa while allegedly driving drunk flew home Monday without facing charges, enraging Canadians who felt that he was getting away with murder. Canada's Foreign Ministry had asked Moscow to waive diplomatic immunity for the man, 45-year-old Andrei Knyazev, and a colleague who was involved in a separate crash the same day. But Russian authorities refused, saying the pair would face appropriate punishment at home under Russian law.
SPORTS
October 30, 2013 | By David Wharton
The president of the International Olympic Committee reaffirmed his belief that Russia's anti-gay law will not impact the 2014 Sochi Games and said organizers are preparing an “excellent, unique and a perfect stage for the athletes to perform at their best. " Thomas Bach made his statements Wednesday, the third day of a four-day tour of Sochi and its nearby mountains. "I can confidently say that all the athletes will be warmly welcomed and they will be suitable impressed with the athletes' villages and competition venues," he said.
WORLD
January 10, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - A law allowing Americans to adopt Russian children will remain valid for another year despite Moscow's recent controversial decision to end the practice, the Kremlin said Thursday. The adoption agreement signed by Russia and the United States in June will run until January 2014 because the agreement calls for it to remain active for a year after either of the parties chooses to end it, officials said. “The agreement is active now,” said Dmitry Peskov, spokesman for President Vladimir Putin.
SPORTS
October 21, 2013 | By David Wharton
New Zealand speed skater Blake Skjellerup plans on competing as an openly gay athlete at the 2014 Sochi Olympics and has said he will wear a rainbow pin on his uniform. That would put him in defiance of Russian legislation that outlaws public displays of support for gay rights. But Skjellerup will have the backing of his own government. New Zealand officials say they will appoint a member of their Moscow embassy to ensure that Kiwi athletes and fans are not targeted by the controversial anti-gay laws.
WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament on Wednesday approved an amnesty law that could allow two jailed members of the punk music group Pussy Riot to go free and pardon 30 people facing charges over a Greenpeace protest against Arctic oil drilling. But human rights activists complained that the bill unanimously approved by the State Duma, or lower house, is too narrow and will free only 2,000 to 5,000 inmates when it takes effect this week. The amnesty was seen as an attempt to deflect criticism of Russia's human rights record ahead of the Olympic Winter Games, which will take place in the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Todd Martens
Jailed members of Pussy Riot are expected be freed months ahead of when their prison terms are due to end. Russian lawmakers on Wednesday approved an amnesty law that would clear an immediate path of freedom for Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina. Russian news agency RIA Novosti reports that the amnesty bill, floated in early December to mark the 20th anniversary of the nation's constitution, "will be applied to thousands of Russian prisoners -- primarily retirees, invalids, women with children and pregnant women, and victims of the Chernobyl disaster.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
A jailed member of Russian punk band Pussy Riot has gone missing in the country's prison system, her family says. Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, known commonly as Nadya, was scheduled to be transferred from a prison in the Republic of Mordovia on Oct. 21, after embarking on a hunger strike to protest conditions there. But she has not been heard from since, her family said, nor has any information been forthcoming from government officials. “There's no proof she's alive,” Andrei Tolokonnikov, Nadya's father, told the website Buzzfeed.
SPORTS
October 30, 2013 | By David Wharton
The president of the International Olympic Committee reaffirmed his belief that Russia's anti-gay law will not impact the 2014 Sochi Games and said organizers are preparing an “excellent, unique and a perfect stage for the athletes to perform at their best. " Thomas Bach made his statements Wednesday, the third day of a four-day tour of Sochi and its nearby mountains. "I can confidently say that all the athletes will be warmly welcomed and they will be suitable impressed with the athletes' villages and competition venues," he said.
SPORTS
October 21, 2013 | By David Wharton
New Zealand speed skater Blake Skjellerup plans on competing as an openly gay athlete at the 2014 Sochi Olympics and has said he will wear a rainbow pin on his uniform. That would put him in defiance of Russian legislation that outlaws public displays of support for gay rights. But Skjellerup will have the backing of his own government. New Zealand officials say they will appoint a member of their Moscow embassy to ensure that Kiwi athletes and fans are not targeted by the controversial anti-gay laws.
SPORTS
September 10, 2013 | By Philip Hersh
BUENOS AIRES - Thomas Bach was doing media interviews Tuesday when Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic organizing committee, interrupted to hand Bach a cellphone. On the line was Russian President Vladimir Putin, the first head of state to speak with Bach after the German had been elected the ninth president of the International Olympic Committee. "We did not discuss the law," Bach said, laughing, after his brief conversation with Putin. But how the IOC deals with all the issues related to "the law," Russia's recent anti-gay legislation, is a serious challenge Bach immediately faces after becoming the eighth white European man in the IOC presidency.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the proposals one might make to a Roman Catholic bishop, a proposal of marriage is probably the least common and most audacious. But in Russia, that is precisely what local authorities have suggested to two Catholic prelates trying to obtain permission to live and work in the former atheist superpower.
WORLD
December 27, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir Putin left little room for maneuvering Thursday when he suggested he was likely to sign the so-called Dima Yakovlev law, which would ban adoptions of Russian children by Americans. The measure, which includes other sanctions against the United States, is intended as a response to an American law passed by Congress and signed by President Obama earlier this month. The Sergei Magnitsky Act denies visas to Russian officials involved in the prosecution and death of a Russian lawyer and whistleblower who called attention to alleged official corruption.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Wentworth Miller is gay, and he's making sure Russia knows it. The "Prison Break" actor went public about his sexuality in a political way Wednesday, sending a letter to the director of the St. Petersburg International Film Festival in which he politely declined an invitation to attend as a guest of honor and explained exactly why he was RSVPing "no. " First the polite part: "Thank you for your kind invitation," he wrote in the letter ...
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