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October 10, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Improving badly eroded relations with Moscow and pushing for cuts in both countries' nuclear stockpiles has been a key piece of President Obama's revamped foreign policy. But as word of his winning the Nobel Peace Prize spread through Moscow today, the reaction was distinctly chilly. No official congratulations were immediately forthcoming from the Kremlin. "The awarding of the prize to Obama testifies to the deep disappointment caused by the policies of George Bush," Mikhail Margelov, chair of the foreign affairs committee in the upper house of the Russian parliament, told RIA Novosti.
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WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated and corrected. See the notes below for details.
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's acting president said Tuesday that it would be at least two more days before an interim government is in place as further negotiations are needed to ensure that a genuine “coalition of national faith” agrees to see the divided country through to May 25 elections. Interim President Olexander Turchynov made the announcement to the parliament now dominated by opposition figures and defected members of fugitive ex-President Viktor Yanukovich's Party of Regions.
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NEWS
August 23, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a Moscow crowd's raucous cries of "Shoot them!" to mounting calls for purges in the army, media and government, the triumphant opponents of this week's attempted coup turned increasingly Thursday to demands for the spoils of their victory and the savor of revenge.
WORLD
July 19, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his former business partner, Pyotr Ofitserov, were released from custody Friday, one day after their conviction in a controversial embezzlement case, Interfax news agency reported. A district court in the regional capital of Kirov had sentenced Navalny and Ofitserov to five years and four years in prison, respectively, and fined them $15,000 each on charges of embezzling $530,000 from a local timber company in 2009. The Kirov regional court ruled that both men should be released while they appeal the verdict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1992
In response to "We All Won It," editorial, Aug. 22: Who won the Cold War? The Soviet economic system produced the lowest standard of living of any industrialized society. Had the West done nothing, the Russian leaders would have been without their bogyman and the collapse would have occurred long ago. The same idiocy has kept Castro propped up for more than three decades. BOB MUNSON, Newbury Park
OPINION
May 29, 2002
The signature ink is not dry on the farcical nuclear reduction treaty just signed by the U.S. and Russian leaders and the praise is thundering (May 25). If it is a treaty, as I understand it, the Senate must consent, and we should demand that the senators do not. Claiming a significant reduction in nuclear warheads, the treaty does not require either party to destroy a single one. They can be stored to be used at any future time. Nor does this treaty deal with "Star Wars," that expensive, technically infeasible weapon, the most destabilizing ever conceived.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Paul Richter
MOSCOW -- Mitt Romney's comment that Russia is America's “No. 1 geopolitical foe,” a red-meat line for Republicans, is also attracting some attention in Moscow. Alexey Pushkov, chairman of the international affairs committee of the State Duma, said in a recent interview that Russian leaders have noted Romney's comments with concern, and are watching with interest as neoconservative and “realist” advisers maneuver for influence within the campaign. “We don't think that for us Romney will be an easy partner,” said Pushkov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin.
OPINION
September 13, 2004
Your attempt to dissociate terrorism from Islam ("Criminals, Not Muslims," editorial, Sept. 9) is typical of the American media and ignores the obvious: Most terrorists are professed Muslims. Were any other religious group or ideology so consistently breeding suicide bombers, the condemnation and calls for reform would swiftly follow. Instead, your editorial is careful to disconnect the terrorists from the religion which they so openly claim drives them. It is time the world community answers two questions: What is it about Islam that repeatedly leads some adherents to terrorism; and why is the mainstream media so hesitant to connect the dots?
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
In a private conversation captured by a hot microphone, President Obama today appeared to be putting off diplomatic talks with Russian leaders about a controversial missile defense system until after November. Television footage shows Obama telling Russian leader Dmitri Medvedev that "after my election I will have more flexibility. " An advisor to Obama later said the two were talking about Russia's objections to the system, agreeing to talk later because of political concerns on both sides.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
U.S. politics combined with diplomacy as Russian President Dmitri Medvedev took a swipe at Mitt Romney and President Obama, pointing to an uncooperative Congress and a toxic political environment at home to explain why he was delaying negotiations with Russian leaders over missile defense. Romney, in a CNN interview Monday, had referred to Russia as "our No. 1 geopolitical foe," prompting Medvedev to tell reporters here that the Republican front-runner's language seemed out of date and "smelled of Hollywood" stereotypes.
WORLD
July 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See note below.
MOSCOW -- Alexei Navalny, Russia's most popular and charismatic opposition leader, was sentenced Thursday to five years in prison and ordered to pay a fine of about $15,000 in a high-profile embezzlement trial that Navalny claimed was politically motivated. The district court trial in Kirov, a regional capital about 500 miles northeast of Moscow, was based on the alleged 2009 embezzlement of about $530,000 in timber trade from a local  company, which has since gone bankrupt. [Updated, 10:30 a.m. PDT July 18: Thousands of people angered by Navalny's conviction took to the streets of Moscow on Thursday.
WORLD
June 17, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
ENNISKILLEN, Northern Ireland - President Obama differed sharply with Russia's leader over the Syrian civil war in an icy encounter Monday illustrating how difficult it may be to drive Syrian President Bashar Assad from power, even after some rebel groups begin to receive U.S. weaponry. Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin held their first face-to-face meeting in a year at the Group of 8 summit of the world's richest countries days after Obama deepened U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir Putin declared Thursday that change was needed in Damascus, further distancing Moscow from Syrian President Bashar Assad in another sign that Assad's support may be fraying even among his few remaining allies. Putin made the comments as a United Nations panel concluded that Syria's raging conflict had become "overtly sectarian" and was drawing foreign fighters after almost two years of violence and tens of thousands of deaths. Putin said Russia would not back Assad, long a close ally, "at any price," and he used some of the Kremlin's strongest language to date indicating that Russia recognized that Assad's days were numbered.
WORLD
October 6, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - He slowly descended the stairs to the courtyard, his handgun loaded with 12 rounds. Seven armed comrades stood in the windows behind him. At the bottom, a drunk and angry crowd of 5,000 threatened to storm the building. Just moments before, they had looted the Dresden office of the feared East German secret police next door. It was shortly after the fall of Berlin Wall in October 1989. The Soviet KGB Dresden station chief had run away, leaving his deputy, a lieutenant colonel, in command.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Paul Richter
MOSCOW -- Mitt Romney's comment that Russia is America's “No. 1 geopolitical foe,” a red-meat line for Republicans, is also attracting some attention in Moscow. Alexey Pushkov, chairman of the international affairs committee of the State Duma, said in a recent interview that Russian leaders have noted Romney's comments with concern, and are watching with interest as neoconservative and “realist” advisers maneuver for influence within the campaign. “We don't think that for us Romney will be an easy partner,” said Pushkov, an ally of President Vladimir Putin.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
U.S. politics combined with diplomacy as Russian President Dmitri Medvedev took a swipe at Mitt Romney and President Obama, pointing to an uncooperative Congress and a toxic political environment at home to explain why he was delaying negotiations with Russian leaders over missile defense. Romney, in a CNN interview Monday, had referred to Russia as "our No. 1 geopolitical foe," prompting Medvedev to tell reporters here that the Republican front-runner's language seemed out of date and "smelled of Hollywood" stereotypes.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Thursday that he is not worried by Russia's new, more assertive military doctrine and remains confident that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin wants to cooperate with the United States. Christopher told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that, although Russia abandoned its pledge not to be the first to use nuclear weapons in a conflict, U.S. officials did not consider that move significant because they never had believed the earlier promise.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Thursday gave Russian leaders their first detailed look at an Atlantic alliance offer to unilaterally cut arms levels in Europe, but it remained unclear how far the proposal would go toward dampening Moscow's opposition to an eastward NATO expansion. Albright spent an hour with Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and more than three hours with her Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Yevgeny M.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
In a private conversation captured by a hot microphone, President Obama today appeared to be putting off diplomatic talks with Russian leaders about a controversial missile defense system until after November. Television footage shows Obama telling Russian leader Dmitri Medvedev that "after my election I will have more flexibility. " An advisor to Obama later said the two were talking about Russia's objections to the system, agreeing to talk later because of political concerns on both sides.
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