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WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry paid a whirlwind, four-hour visit to Moldova on Wednesday, the first time America's top diplomat dropped by the former Soviet republic in more than 20 years. Kerry's unexpected stop followed a decision to skip a planned visit to Ukraine, which has been engulfed in political unrest since President Viktor Yanukovich announced he was shelving plans for association and trade agreements with the European Union. Moldova and Georgia went through with their pledges to boost economic and political ties with the 28-nation Western bloc in spite of pressure from Russia to join the emerging, Moscow-led Eurasian Union instead.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Olga Grigoryants, guest blogger
After pro-Russia forces entered Crimea this year, many of my American friends were aghast and worried that the situation might escalate. But in Russia, where I grew up, it's an alternate universe.  My friends and family are outraged at those who oppose the intrusion. Instead of being appalled by the violence threatening Ukraine's sovereignty, they are irate about Western critiques of President Vladimir Putin and his policies. Every time I post something supporting Ukraine on Facebook, such as a recent article about members of pro-Russia forces attacking opposition leaders in Crimea, my Russian friends lash out, calling me brainwashed.
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NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian media magnate Vladimir A. Gusinsky was behind bars again after a Spanish judge ordered him back to prison ahead of the start of extradition proceedings, a lawyer for Gusinsky said. A judge on Spain's High Court brought forward the start date for the extradition hearing to Thursday and ordered Gusinsky sent back to jail to ensure his attendance in court, defense lawyer Domingo Plazas said.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin's unimpeded success in annexing Crimea has inspired Russian nationalists in eastern Ukraine to seize territory and sown fear region-wide that such provocations will spur Moscow to intervene on behalf of ethnic Russians. The occupation of government buildings in the Ukrainian cities of Donetsk, Lugansk and Kharkiv on Sunday mirrors what happened in Crimea, where Russian forces barricaded themselves in local authorities' offices and demanded a referendum on whether to the peninsula should secede and join Russia.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish police seized fugitive Russian media mogul Vladimir A. Gusinsky on Tuesday at his villa in the southern province of Cadiz, but Gusinsky's lawyers immediately argued that he is a victim of Kremlin political machinations and should not be extradited to Moscow. Gusinsky--who has controlled Russia's only independent television station, NTV--fled Russia after being briefly jailed in June.
NEWS
March 16, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When two masked, pipe-wielding attackers crashed through a balcony window into his bedroom at 4 a.m., all that saved journalist Alexander V. Minkin was the drapery that entangled the hit men and a crate of apples stored in the doorway that caused them to trip.
WORLD
October 19, 2003 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The closure of the last independent Russian TV station in June left the country's most talented and fearless journalists with a final refuge in television. At Ekho-TV, a small Moscow studio, they can say what they like, but their broadcasts are never seen on any channel in the country. While the banner of independent television in Russia has been torn down, Ekho-TV is like a small forlorn corner, beaming news to expatriate Russians around the world.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the heart of a war zone come jarring pictures of people dancing, swaying, cheering, smiling--civilians whose country is being bombed intensively by the most powerful nations on Earth--triggering the question: What can these people have to celebrate? Like a football crowd, they are chanting, "Russ-i-a! Russ-i-a!" They are Yugoslav Serbs, and they are cheering a Russian TV crew in their capital, Belgrade.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A religious icon that was stolen from Russia's famed State Hermitage Museum was found dumped in a trash bin in St. Petersburg, police officials said Thursday. The find of the wooden icon, identified as the Assembly of All Saints, came just days after Hermitage officials announced the theft of more than 220 items valued at more than $5 million -- an incident director Mikhail Piotrovsky blamed on museum workers.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | From Associated Press
Federal troops struggled to retake the Chechen capital Sunday as their prime minister promised reinforcements to end the confrontation in Grozny that has embarrassed President Boris N. Yeltsin. At an emergency session of the government's Chechnya commission in Moscow, Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said "radical measures" are needed to resolve the situation in the secessionist republic.
WORLD
April 1, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
NATO foreign ministers suspended civilian and military cooperation with Russia on Tuesday and ordered plans for bolstering defenses in Eastern Europe to show the Kremlin that it will protect allies in the region from any further Russian aggression, alliance sources told news agencies in Brussels. In their first meeting since Russia occupied and annexed Ukraine's Crimea territory, the top diplomats from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 28 member states closed ranks in unanimously voting to increase pressure on Moscow to cease massing troops on Ukraine's border.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before trying out a new dentist. The Skinny: Another intense episode of "The Americans" on Wednesday night. It almost made me forget the 20 minutes of "Mixology" I forced myself to endure. Almost. Thursday's roundup includes former Warner Bros. movie chief Jeff Robinov closing in on a new deal. Also, Fox is looking for big bucks from advertisers for commercials in "24" when it returns in May. Daily Dose: The NBC publicity machine is going into high gear for "Girls" creator Lena Dunham's hosting of "Saturday Night Live" this week.
WORLD
March 5, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The State Department mocked Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday in unusually pointed language, calling his claims about the Ukraine crisis the most "startling Russian fiction" since the novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote that "the formula 'two plus two equals five' is not without its attractions. " Under the heading "President Putin's Fiction," the statement challenged 10 assertions Putin had made in recent days to justify Russian troop incursions into Ukraine's Crimea region.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia -- The man behind the design of the snowboard of Russian Alexey Sobolev said the inspiration came from old EC horror comic books, not the feminist punk rock band Pussy Riot. Clarity came from artist Brian Romero, who emerged on Instagram to say just that, citing the greatest hits of the genre, Tales of the Crypt, Vault of Horror and Weird Science, among others. " But the viewer always brings their own baggage to the table," wrote Romero, who is the art director of the Los Angeles-based Baker Boys Distribution.  Sobolev competed in slopestyle qualifying on Thursday morning at the Olympics and there were questions from Russian media about the snowboard, which featured a design of a knife-wielding woman wearing a ski mask.
WORLD
December 4, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry paid a whirlwind, four-hour visit to Moldova on Wednesday, the first time America's top diplomat dropped by the former Soviet republic in more than 20 years. Kerry's unexpected stop followed a decision to skip a planned visit to Ukraine, which has been engulfed in political unrest since President Viktor Yanukovich announced he was shelving plans for association and trade agreements with the European Union. Moldova and Georgia went through with their pledges to boost economic and political ties with the 28-nation Western bloc in spite of pressure from Russia to join the emerging, Moscow-led Eurasian Union instead.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Fugitive NSA leaker Edward Snowden will be allowed to leave the Moscow airport, where he has been holed up for more than a month following a Russian government decision to consider his request for temporary asylum, Russian media reported Wednesday. “Snowden is passing the passport control now, a procedure that for him, a man without a valid passport, may take longer than just stamping a passport,” a Federal Migration Service officer who requested anonymity told the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | Associated Press
Authorities investigating embezzlement allegations against Russian media mogul Vladimir A. Gusinsky compiled an inventory of his belongings Wednesday in preparation to seize his property. Investigators spent the day taking stock of Gusinsky's house in Chigasovo, a Moscow suburb. Valery Nikolayev, the chief investigator in the case, said that the confiscation could extend to property Gusinsky holds abroad and that Russia would appeal to Interpol for help.
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Russia's Constitutional Court dealt a sharp blow to President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday by upholding the conservative-run Parliament's vote to strip him of control over state-owned television and news agencies. But whether the verdict actually means anything in the confusing turmoil of Russian politics became the topic of debate. The Itar-Tass news agency, the Russian Information Agency and Russian Television--the affected media--kept operating as before.
WORLD
July 24, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- The latest bid by fugitive National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden to leave a Moscow airport has run into bureaucratic hurdles, his Russian lawyer said Wednesday. Russian media reported that Snowden would be allowed to leave the transit zone where he has been holed up for more than a month following a government decision to consider his request for temporary asylum. But he was turned back at passport control because he did not have all the paperwork he needed, a Russian immigration official told The Times.
WORLD
June 26, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Now that Russian intelligence services have presumably gotten what they want from Edward Snowden  - his treasure trove of U.S. intelligence data and the chance to embarrass the Obama administration - they are showing the National Security Agency leaker to the door. Russian President Vladimir Putin's claims that his security services weren't working with the young American fugitive may have been semantically correct: Agents could copy Snowden's confidential computer files without his cooperation, as he has been in their custody for days in a diplomatic no man's land at Sheremetyevo airport.
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