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WORLD
January 28, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Metropolitan Kirill, a prominent and politically astute priest with a reputation as a modernizer, was elected patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church on Tuesday. With his enthronement Sunday, Kirill will become the first patriarch inducted since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. He takes charge at a time when the Russian Orthodox Church enjoys wealth and political influence unmatched since the days of czarist Russia.
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NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By David Horsey
It is rather curious, given the American conservative movement's long and dramatic history of anti-Communism and anti-Russian saber-rattling, that many leading voices on the right are speaking about Russian President Vladimir Putin with varying degrees of admiration.  For some, it is just a matter of comparing Putin's toughness with President Obama's alleged weakness. Without suggesting any love for Putin, Republicans in Congress have asserted that Russia's incursion into Ukraine would not have happened had Obama not been such a wimp in his dealings with Moscow.
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WORLD
April 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
KARABANOVO, Russia - His unruly mane of white hair giving him the look of Moses, Father Georgy Edelstein struggled over the grayish snow that is the late-spring landscape of this barren village, heading to his church for Good Friday services. When he got to its small, darkened main hall, the 79-year-old put a simple silver cross over his robes and began saying prayers on one of the holiest days in the Russian Orthodox Church. His audience: his assistant and one villager. Two days later, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill, exchanged hearty Easter kisses with President-elect Vladimir Putin amid the lavish interiors of Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral, his jewel-encrusted cross and gold brocade robe shining in the television limelight.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Mikhail Kalashnikov denied throughout his long life that he bore any responsibility for the millions of deaths caused by his namesake invention, the 100 million-plus AK-47 assault rifles that have been the weapon of choice for guerrillas, terrorists and kidnappers as well as standing armies. But the soldier-turned-inventor who died last month at age 94 apparently was tormented by feelings of guilt at the end of his life and wrote to the head of the Russian Orthodox Church last April to confess his anguish, the Izvestia daily newspaper reported Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2002 | JAY REEVES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Rev. Benedict Tallant seems like a typical Alabama preacher with his GMC pickup truck and slow drawl, yet the three-armed cross and onion-shaped copper dome on his little brick church stand out in the Bible Belt. Tallant--Father Benedict to parishioners--is pastor of St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church, the oldest patriarchal Russian congregation in the South. Just as Roman Catholic churches report to the pope in Rome, tiny St.
NEWS
September 30, 1985 | United Press International
Ending a 20-year ban, China has formally reinstated the Russian Eastern Orthodox Church in the vast northwestern region of Xinjiang bordering the Soviet Union, the official New China News Agency reported Sunday. The announcement came as Chinese leaders arrived in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region to mark the 30th anniversary Tuesday of its founding. Xinjiang, a rugged, thinly populated area, was settled by a mass influx of Han Chinese in the early 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1988 | NINA SHEA and ANNA D. TAPAY, Nina Shea and Anna D. Tapay are the executive director and the program director of Puebla Institute, a Washington-based lay Catholic human-rights group principally focused on religious freedom. Their report, "Religion and the Soviet State," was released last month.
The observance of the millennium of Christianity in the Soviet Union this week invites a look at the status of religious freedom in that country. The fundamental question is whether ordinary Soviet citizens of all faiths are allowed to worship and practice their religion without undue state interference. The answer remains unequivocally no. Despite the move toward reform in several key areas of Soviet life, repression remains the overall policy on religious activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 44 years, the Catholics of Mshana have had no place to pray. Like all other Ukrainian Catholic Churches, the tin-domed church of Mshana was absorbed into the Russian Orthodox Church in 1946, on the orders of the dictator Josef Stalin, as part of his drive to eliminate Ukrainian nationalism. "Our church has never been Orthodox, and it never will be," Denko Koblitsky, a defiant Catholic farmer said recently, pointing with pride to the tiny, 200-year-old building.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the tumult in the Soviet Union, the Russian Orthodox Church has emerged as a visible and powerful force, overcoming seven decades of communism that sought to write God's obituary. During the hard-liners' attempted coup in August, priests handed out the New Testament to resisters and soldiers while affixing icons of Jesus Christ to tanks and barricades in Moscow. When the outcome of the coup was still in doubt, church Patriarch Alexei II demanded that detained Soviet President Mikhail S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
An old woman wearing peasant clothes and a kerchief stands in front of a Russian church topped by gilded cupolas. The scene could be out of a long-ago century if it weren't for a Ford pickup parked nearby and a TV antenna sprouting from a house.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Michael McGough
As pro-Western and pro-Russian Ukrainians battle over the future orientation of their country, there is a world figure who could offer an important symbolic gift to European-minded Ukrainians: Pope Francis. Stalin supposedly dismissed the importance of the Roman Catholic Church by asking: “How many divisions does the pope have?” But before and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has kept a wary eye on the Vatican's activities, particularly in connection with the former Soviet Socialist Republic of Ukraine.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By David Horsey
Pandering to the Russian Orthodox Church and to the homophobia of a huge share of the Russian people, President Vladimir Putin's government has approved new laws that tighten the screws on gays and lesbians. Though this may gain him political points at home, Putin has further darkened the image of his country internationally -- at least in the parts of the world where human rights are valued. In the United States, Europe and elsewhere, pro-gay activists are pushing a boycott of Russian vodka and discussing a boycott of the 2014 Winter Olympics set to be held in Sochi, Russia.
OPINION
June 19, 2013 | By Patricia Herlihy
The Kremlin has just issued a 12-year plan to address Russia's demographic crisis - that is, its high mortality rate and low birthrate. Buoyed apparently by a recent rise in the birthrate - 1.9 million Russian children were born in 2012, compared with 1.2 million in 1992 - the country has announced that it will give bonuses to families that have more than two children and will provide better healthcare, housing and education for families. In addition to these "carrots," the government has announced some "sticks": Divorce will be taxed as an "act of hatred toward children," and a fixed sum of alimony will be demanded even of those who are poor or unemployed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Movie premieres can bring some unusual guests to the podium. But even the most eccentric aren't typically wearing masks because they fear reprisals from Vladimir Putin. At a the New York kickoff for HBO Documentaries' "Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer" on Wendesday, two members of the musical collective did just that. Puck and Headlight, as they were referred to, came to the stage after the screening wearing the group's signature colorful ski masks, or balaclavas. It was their first trip to the U.S. since Pussy Riot came to worldwide fame, and they were here, filmmakers said, in deep disguise because of what could await them back home if their identities were revealed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The Russian punk band Pussy Riot has never released a record, let alone an album. It's hard to tell by the video posted online by the band whether the three women even know how to play musical instruments. But because of that video, which documents them banging around inside a church with colored hoods on their heads, and the resulting outcry, they're the biggest punk rock band in the world right now. Friday, its three members were each sentenced to two years in prison on charges of hooliganism.
WORLD
April 22, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
KARABANOVO, Russia - His unruly mane of white hair giving him the look of Moses, Father Georgy Edelstein struggled over the grayish snow that is the late-spring landscape of this barren village, heading to his church for Good Friday services. When he got to its small, darkened main hall, the 79-year-old put a simple silver cross over his robes and began saying prayers on one of the holiest days in the Russian Orthodox Church. His audience: his assistant and one villager. Two days later, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill, exchanged hearty Easter kisses with President-elect Vladimir Putin amid the lavish interiors of Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral, his jewel-encrusted cross and gold brocade robe shining in the television limelight.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Patriarch Pimen, the head of the Russian Orthodox Church who presided over the faith's reawakening after decades of repression, died today at the age of 79, Tass reported. No cause of death was given in the terse announcement. In recent years, Pimen rarely celebrated services because of his increasing frailty. Pimen, as patriarch of Moscow and all Russia, led tens of millions of believers in the officially atheist Soviet Union. After a historic meeting with President Mikhail S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | Associated Press
The Ukrainian branch of the Russian Orthodox Church has denounced a new national ID system as "the mark of the Antichrist." The system introduced last fall is similar to U.S. Social Security numbers and has become more widespread in recent weeks. The Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine appealed to President Leonid Kuchma, the government and Parliament to change it.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In a wide-ranging trip to Europe this year, I found three major new museums to love: in Amsterdam, the first satellite branch of Russia's celebrated Hermitage; in Rome, a long-awaited museum for contemporary arts that is a work of art itself; and in Paris, a picture gallery with a constantly changing program of special exhibitions meant to shake up the enterprise of art appreciation. The Hermitage Amsterdam The Hermitage, begun by Empress Catherine II in 1764, has 350 galleries in a series of decaying royal palaces near the Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia.
WORLD
January 28, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Metropolitan Kirill, a prominent and politically astute priest with a reputation as a modernizer, was elected patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church on Tuesday. With his enthronement Sunday, Kirill will become the first patriarch inducted since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. He takes charge at a time when the Russian Orthodox Church enjoys wealth and political influence unmatched since the days of czarist Russia.
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