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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996
Your June 11 front-page photo of Boris Yeltsin on stage shows how Russian politics are paralleling ours. All he needs is Bill Clinton backing him on sax. SKIP NEWMAN Los Angeles
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WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The Russian Justice Ministry accused an election watchdog of failing to register as a “foreign agent” on Tuesday, alleging the group still receives funding from abroad. Golos, a nongovernmental organization that monitors Russian elections, is the first group to face charges under a new law that requires Russian groups that get foreign funding to register as “foreign agents” or risk fines, restrictions on public protest and imprisonment. In a statement on its website , the Justice Ministry said Tuesday that it had filed charges against Golos, alleging that the group must register because it is involved in Russian politics and receives foreign funds.
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NEWS
September 22, 1993
Key events in Russian politics since the failed Soviet coup in August 1991: 1991 August--Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin emerges as nation's most powerful politician after Soviet coup fails. Yeltsin suspends the Communist Party of Soviet Union and seizes its property. October--Yeltsin outlines radical reform program, including freeing prices and privatizing small businesses. November--Yeltsin names himself head of government, takes over duties of prime minister.
WORLD
December 12, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir Putin stunned high-level officials Wednesday by proposing restrictions on their ability to possess Western bank accounts and own real estate abroad. Putin, in his first state-of-the-union speech since returning to the presidency, focused largely on domestic issues, saying that fighting corruption is one of the key priorities of his third presidential term and that Russia should look for guidance in its own history. Putin said at a gathering of government ministers, lawmakers, regional governors and spiritual leaders in the Grand Kremlin Palace that he wanted their support in limiting the rights of bureaucrats and politicians to hold foreign bank accounts and stocks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1994 | STEPHEN F. COHEN, Stephen F. Cohen is a professor of politics and the director of Russian Studies at Princeton University.
The worst and most predictable American foreign-policy failure of the late 20th Century has been unfolding in post-communist Russia ever since the Soviet breakup in 1991. All the outcomes we want in a country that remains so essential to our security--democracy, a prospering economy, a political Establishment friendly to the West, major reductions and safeguarding of nuclear weapons and other devices of mass destruction--have been undermined by U.S. government policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1993 | YURI KARASH, Yuri Karash has a Ph.D. from the Russian Academy of Science. He is working on his second doctorate at American University. and
Russia's parliamentary elections Sunday will determine the political life of the country for the next two years. What shape that takes will depend on the distribution of power among the three principal electoral blocs: Russia's Choice, led by Yegor T. Gaidar; Party of the Russian Unity and Accord, led by Sergei M. Shakhrai, and a third bloc, led by Grigory A. Yavlinsky, Yuri Y. Boldyrev and Vladimir P. Lukin. What is the goal of each of these blocs?
WORLD
December 2, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
On the television screen, three dark-skinned men from the Caucasus sit sullenly munching watermelon in a Moscow courtyard, then brazenly toss the chewed rinds into the path of a young blond woman pushing a baby carriage. Two ethnic Russians glare at the watermelon thugs. "Clean it up," one of them says menacingly. The words "Let's clean our city of trash" flash across the screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | BORIS M. PARAMONOV and DMITRI N. SHALIN, Boris M. Paramonov is senior correspondent for Radio Liberty. Dmitri N. Shalin is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. and
Alexander Solzhenitsyn is about to end his 20-year exile and return to his native Russia. "I hope I can be at least of some help to my tormented nation," he recently told a town meeting in Cavendish, Vt. Many in his homeland harbor similar hopes. The desperate conditions Russia faces today make his entry into politics not only feasible but also desirable. The political process in today's Russia is hopelessly deadlocked.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin realized that he needed Western-style advertising to help get his party's referendum approved by Russian voters, he didn't turn to Madison Avenue. He turned to Malibu. Malibu? Yes, Malibu, home to Johnny Carson, Cher and Alice's Restaurant. Now Malibu can also claim to be home to the tiny political ad agency that just might have played some small role in salvaging--at least temporarily--democratic-style reforms in Russia.
WORLD
November 27, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party has always billed itself as the worker's party. Alexei Kondaurov, who is running for parliament on the Communist ticket, is no exception. He works five days a week as an executive of Yukos Oil Co., earning $629,556 a year. Sergei Muravlenko also aspires to represent the Communists in parliament. Board chairman of Yukos until June, Muravlenko earns $10 million a year and owns a Porsche, a BMW and two Mercedeses.
WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced Saturday what many had long suspected: that he will run for president in the spring in the expectation of extending his grip on Russian politics for an additional six years — and perhaps longer. The announcement at a congress of the ruling United Russia party ended months of speculation about maneuvering inside the Kremlin by Putin and his protege, Dmitry Medvedev, who became president in 2008 when Putin left the office because of term limits.
WORLD
September 16, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
One of Russia's wealthiest men on Thursday abruptly quit as leader of a party casting itself as a challenger to the Kremlin's stranglehold on politics, suggesting to supporters that a feared power broker had orchestrated a takeover because the party was becoming too independent. The decision several months ago by Mikhail Prokhorov, a businessman who owns the New Jersey Nets basketball team, to try to revive the moribund Right Cause party had been controversial from the start. Prokhorov has decried the lack of alternatives to the governing party.
WORLD
May 10, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
U.S. troops marched through Red Square for the first time in a Victory Day parade on Sunday as Russia celebrated the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II. It was a scene cut from Russia's Cold War nightmares: 71 Americans in dark blue dress uniforms carried the U.S. flag over the cobblestones, past the mausoleum of Vladimir Lenin and the towers of the Kremlin wall to salute Russian leaders. French, British and Polish soldiers also took part in the parade in a tribute to the role the Allies played in what Russia called the Great Patriotic War. Under clear skies, the reviewing stands were packed with Russian officials, foreign dignitaries and hundreds of aging war veterans.
WORLD
December 2, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
On the television screen, three dark-skinned men from the Caucasus sit sullenly munching watermelon in a Moscow courtyard, then brazenly toss the chewed rinds into the path of a young blond woman pushing a baby carriage. Two ethnic Russians glare at the watermelon thugs. "Clean it up," one of them says menacingly. The words "Let's clean our city of trash" flash across the screen.
WORLD
July 1, 2005 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A St. Petersburg court Thursday convicted an organizer and a gunman in the murder of one of post-Soviet Russia's most prominent democracy activists, sentencing the men to long prison terms. But many questions remained unresolved, including whether someone else ordered the killing. The 1998 slaying of lawmaker Galina V. Starovoitova, widely viewed as a political assassination, provoked a wave of anger and shock across the country and around the world.
WORLD
November 27, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party has always billed itself as the worker's party. Alexei Kondaurov, who is running for parliament on the Communist ticket, is no exception. He works five days a week as an executive of Yukos Oil Co., earning $629,556 a year. Sergei Muravlenko also aspires to represent the Communists in parliament. Board chairman of Yukos until June, Muravlenko earns $10 million a year and owns a Porsche, a BMW and two Mercedeses.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is where the road to nowhere ended Tuesday, an industrial pothole of a town that hosted one of the strangest wild-goose chases that Russian politics has ever seen.
OPINION
January 9, 2000 | Steven Merritt Miner, Steven Merritt Miner, a professor of Russian history at Ohio University, is the author of "Selling Stalin."
In Soviet days, the art of Kremlinology consisted in guessing which political figures were rising or falling in power and influence based on such indicators as where a key figure stood atop Lenin's mausoleum during May Day parades. When communism collapsed, it seemed for a time as if these old black arts would no longer be necessary: Democracy would bring a new transparency to Russian public life. In fact, Russia remains different.
OPINION
January 9, 2000 | Steven Merritt Miner, Steven Merritt Miner, a professor of Russian history at Ohio University, is the author of "Selling Stalin."
In Soviet days, the art of Kremlinology consisted in guessing which political figures were rising or falling in power and influence based on such indicators as where a key figure stood atop Lenin's mausoleum during May Day parades. When communism collapsed, it seemed for a time as if these old black arts would no longer be necessary: Democracy would bring a new transparency to Russian public life. In fact, Russia remains different.
OPINION
August 15, 1999 | Steven Merritt Miner, Steven Merritt Miner, professor of Russian history at Ohio University, is the author of "Selling Stalin," about Soviet propaganda
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has again tossed a political hand grenade before darting back behind the Kremlin's walls, leaving observers to wonder at his increasingly inexplicable behavior. With Yeltsin's firing of Prime Minister Sergei V. Stepashin last week, and his appointment of the virtually unknown Vladimir V. Putin as his successor, a total of four people have now served in that position during the past 18 months.
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