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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the world watches a real-life drama about the love invested in a homeland and the blood shed over it, the Open Fist Theatre Company is wrestling with those themes in a staging of "Flight," by Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov. Written in the mid- to late 1920s and banned before it could be presented in the fledgling Soviet Union, the play revisits the final days of the Russian Revolution and civil war, as the opposing armies murder and lay waste to the very things they profess to hold dear.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Newspapers know a thing or two about the Internet eating their lunch. But are TV sets the next to take a fall? An Associated Press story from Seoul suggests as much. It says South Korean TV makers "are making billion-dollar bets on a new display technology that promises an even thinner screen and imagery of eye-popping clarity. " The reason? Apparently consumers aren't as interested in buying new TVs when it's growing increasingly easy to watch stuff on tablets and smartphones.
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BOOKS
October 21, 1990 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Dahlburg, a correspondent in the Moscow bureau of The Times, has reported from the Soviet Union since 1986.
"Russia stood on the edge of an abyss. It seemed as if the country was boiling over from anger, envy and resentments of every imaginable kind, which until then had been kept contained under a lid of awe and fear. Now that the population had lost respect for the government, there was nothing to hold society together." With those apocalyptic words, which might describe the tribulations of Mikhail S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
He might be the most influential filmmaker hardly anyone knows anything about. Though his admirers have run the gamut — Charlie Chaplin, Jean-Luc Godard, those who venerate cinéma vérité — his innovative documentaries are close to impossible to see. Which is what makes "Kino-Eye: The Revolutionary Cinema of Dziga Vertov" such a significant event. Starting Saturday night, the UCLA Film & Television archive will present, courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum's impressive collection, 11 Vertov programs at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In coming years we can expect to see scores of books on the rise and fall of communism. Deservedly so: Although this century's world wars were caused mainly by grasping, fanatic nationalism, future historians will see the past hundred years as defined above all by the ideological combat between capitalism and communism.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
He might be the most influential filmmaker hardly anyone knows anything about. Though his admirers have run the gamut — Charlie Chaplin, Jean-Luc Godard, those who venerate cinéma vérité — his innovative documentaries are close to impossible to see. Which is what makes "Kino-Eye: The Revolutionary Cinema of Dziga Vertov" such a significant event. Starting Saturday night, the UCLA Film & Television archive will present, courtesy of the Austrian Film Museum's impressive collection, 11 Vertov programs at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Stalin' in Moscow: HBO has come up with a fitting locale for the world premiere of its upcoming movie "Stalin." It will take place in Moscow on Nov. 7, the 75th anniversary of the Russian Revolution. In conjunction with the premiere, Russian television will broadcast a symposium on Russia's political future. "Stalin" stars Robert Duvall and will debut on HBO later in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996
On "Saturday Night Live" the question was once asked, "What if Superman had landed in Germany instead of America?" Paul Berman's what-if question about Nikolai I. Bukharin (Opinion, March 10) seems almost as ridiculous. Stalin swept Bukharin aside too easily for the opposite to be taken seriously. What if the Russian Revolution had failed, or what if Lenin had lived to confront Stalin, are logical possibilities. At least in these cases the current of history could have gone in either direction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1988
Medvedev's article shows that myth perpetuation has not died with the coming of glasnost . Medvedev's statement that the "Bolsheviks would never have won their war and created the Soviet Union," without the support of Latvians, Etonians and other minorities implies that the Bolshevik seizure of power was a manifestation of the popular will of those "minorities." The Latvian and Estonian people, along with the Lithuanians, used the opportunity presented by the Russian Revolution and, after defeating the Soviet military, became independent, democratic countries.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Seventy years after the Russian Revolution, more than 3,000 holders of czarist bonds will receive their first checks in partial settlement of claims against the Soviet Union, the British Foreign Office announced Thursday. The checks, for about 10% of the bonds' face value and ranging from a few dollars to over $8,000, are being mailed starting today.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2011 | By Mary Ellen Monahan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I tell Valentina it's my first time in a banya and that I've forgotten to bring birch branches. "Oh, I'll flog you with mine," she says, offering typical Russian hospitality. She begins whacking my back as we sit on long wood benches in the parilka (steam room). Whack! Whack! Whack! The beatings continue for a minute or two as green bits fly about. I wince. "Now it's my turn," she says. I return the favor but am timid. Valentina could be my mother. "Harder!" she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2010
Seven members of the "Jersey Shore" cast will be back in Seaside Heights, N.J., this weekend to begin production on the third season of the MTV show, the network said Tuesday. The only cast member who won't return for more televised fist-pumping is Angelina "Jolie" Pivarnick, 25, who bailed early in the first season but returned for the second, which was filmed in Miami in April and May. The second season of "Jersey Shore" premieres July 29. The third season will air early next year, according to an MTV spokeswoman.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
The most enduring and romantic legend of the Russian Revolution -- that two children of Czar Nicholas II and his wife, Alexandra, survived the slaughter that killed the rest of their family -- may finally be put to rest with the positive identification of bone fragments from a lonely Russian grave.
OPINION
July 18, 2008
If Americans were asked to decide who was the greatest Russian, they might toss out names such as Tolstoy or Tchaikovsky or Peter the Great. Russians are being asked precisely that question, and they can't decide between a czar whose rule was so disastrous that it prompted the Russian Revolution and a psychopathic dictator who killed, exiled or starved millions of his own people.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2008 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON -- From Russia, with qualms. Works by Matisse, Van Gogh, Cezanne and other masterpieces from Russian museums are finally hanging in a London gallery after a last-minute legal change eased Moscow's fears that the paintings could be seized in legal action if they traveled to Britain. The Royal Academy of Arts' blockbuster exhibition "From Russia" gathers 120 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works -- many seized by the Soviet state after the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution.
TRAVEL
February 5, 2006 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
THE first Russian phrase we learned -- this, only minutes after boarding the charter bus that picked us up at the St. Petersburg airport -- was "yellow blue bus." Say it fast, our guide told us, and it sounds like "I love you" in Russian, sort of. In the days to come, we would be drilled on this and other newly acquired snippets of Russian.
BOOKS
December 26, 1999 | MICHAEL HENRY HEIM, Michael Henry Heim is a translator of Central European and Russian fiction and drama. He teaches in the department of Slavic languages and literature at UCLA
If you're interested in the mark that communism, especially its Russian variant, has left on the century, and if you've read Pasternak's "Doctor Zhivago" and Bulgakov's "Master and Margarita" on the cataclysmic, all but cosmic aspects of the Russian Revolution, you might want to have a look at the down-to-earth anatomy of everyday Soviet-style intrigue in Yuri Trifonov's "House on the Embankment" (1976).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1988
Russell Blaine, if you have still not managed to get tickets to "Les Miserables"--don't (Calendar Letters, Aug. 28). I got tickets for just the date I wanted in July, in the mezzanine, close to center. Big deal. For $45 per ticket my two companions and I were treated to the sight of the tops of the actors' heads as they sang forgettable songs and talked in sing-song voices while looking at their feet (or so it seemed from our perch). Meanwhile the rotating stage rotated. And rotated.
BOOKS
January 12, 2003 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price writes frequently for Newsday, the Chicago Tribune and the San Francisco Chronicle.
Like novelists George Orwell and Arthur Koestler, vagabond writer and radical Victor Serge was a seminal witness to the catastrophes of totalitarianism. But today Serge is undoubtedly the least known of the three. The economics of publishing have been not kind to Serge: "The Case of Comrade Tulayev," his great novel of Stalin's purges, has long been out of print, as has his most remarkable work, "Memoirs of a Revolutionary." (My battered, disintegrating copy is held together by a rubber band).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the world watches a real-life drama about the love invested in a homeland and the blood shed over it, the Open Fist Theatre Company is wrestling with those themes in a staging of "Flight," by Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov. Written in the mid- to late 1920s and banned before it could be presented in the fledgling Soviet Union, the play revisits the final days of the Russian Revolution and civil war, as the opposing armies murder and lay waste to the very things they profess to hold dear.
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