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WORLD
February 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected and updated. See the notes below for details.
MOSCOW -- Russian scientists declared Monday that they have found and established the composition of pieces of the meteor that exploded over the Chelyabinsk region last week, injuring hundreds of people and causing millions of dollars worth of damage. Over the weekend, 53 tiny pieces of dark porous material were collected near Chebarkul Lake, 60 miles west of Chelyabinsk, the regional center, officials said. The biggest of the finds was 7 millimeters long. The samples were without doubt meteorites, Viktor Grokhovsky, a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences meteorite committee, said early Monday.
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SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Looks like the Mars rover Opportunity has a few miles more to go before it can break the record for longest off-world driving distance of any rover from Earth. Scientists using NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera have snapped images of the current record-holder, the Russian Lunokhod 2, and found that its meandering path was slightly longer than previous estimates. Two months ago the scrappy Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, which has been roaming the Red Planet since 2004, passed the NASA 22-mile distance record set by the Apollo 17 vehicle that astronauts drove around the moon in December 1972.
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SCIENCE
February 24, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A plant that was frozen in Siberian permafrost for about 30,000 years has been revived by a team of Russian scientists - and borne fruit, to boot. Using tissue from immature fruits buried in fossil squirrel burrows some 90 feet below the surface, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences in Pushchino managed to coax the frozen remains of a Silene stenophylla specimen into full flower, producing delicate white blooms and then fruit. The findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describe what is a record for reviving presumably dead plant tissue - and may provide clues as to what makes some plants hardier and longer-lived than others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Imagine you're driving to work one day when a blazing meteor streaks across the horizon and explodes into a fireball. You'd be pretty shocked, and might even blurt out an expletive or two, right? That's what most of us, including Jon Stewart, would assume. But apparently that's not the case in Russia, where a 10,000-ton space rock lit up the sky last week , injuring hundreds and releasing as much energy as 30 Hiroshima-sized atomic bombs -- or, as the locals call it, "Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
Boris Raushenbach, 86, a rocket scientist who helped the Soviet space program photograph the dark side of the moon. Born in what is now St. Petersburg to a Russian family of German descent, Raushenbach was sent to a labor colony in the Ural Mountains during World War II by Soviet authorities who distrusted his background. But he continued his scientific work in prison, and after the war worked with Sergei Korolyov--the father of the Soviet space program.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun Microsystems has enlisted leading Russian scientists to help with supercomputer development, becoming one of the few American companies to find a way to use the wealth of talent that was used primarily by the former Soviet Union's vast military complex. Sun has been working for a year in cooperative research with a team led by Boris Babayan, a key figure in the Soviet space and defense computing program, said David R. Ditzel, director of advanced systems at Mountain View -based Sun.
WORLD
June 28, 2002 | From Reuters
Rescuers took advantage of moderate weather Thursday to evacuate 21 Russian scientists trapped deep in antarctic waters and said an icebreaker on the way should be able to free their ship. Tanya Hacker of the Cape Town-based Dutch salvage company Smit Marine said two helicopters had flown from the heated deck of the South African research ship Agulhas as soon as the wind moderated. "Both helicopters are back on the ship.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's security service said Wednesday that it has arrested a U.S. businessman for suspected espionage after he allegedly bought information on defense technology from Russian scientists. The FSB, the main successor to the Soviet-era KGB, didn't identify the American. It said it had also arrested a Russian expert on military technology who is alleged to be an accomplice.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Sergei Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian warships are returning to the waters near Syria in a new demonstration of the Kremlin's interest in the outcome of the crisis there. The Russian Defense Ministry told the RIA-Novosti news agency on Tuesday that four large landing vessels were on their way to the Mediterranean near Syria, three weeks after the Russian navy conducted its biggest maneuvers in the region since the breakup of the Soviet Union. "Based on the results of the Navy exercises in the Black and Mediterranean seas from Jan. 19 through Jan. 29 ... the Ministry leadership has taken a decision to continue combat duty by Russian warships in the Mediterranean," the ministry said in its statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Imagine you're driving to work one day when a blazing meteor streaks across the horizon and explodes into a fireball. You'd be pretty shocked, and might even blurt out an expletive or two, right? That's what most of us, including Jon Stewart, would assume. But apparently that's not the case in Russia, where a 10,000-ton space rock lit up the sky last week , injuring hundreds and releasing as much energy as 30 Hiroshima-sized atomic bombs -- or, as the locals call it, "Friday.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Sergei Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian warships are returning to the waters near Syria in a new demonstration of the Kremlin's interest in the outcome of the crisis there. The Russian Defense Ministry told the RIA-Novosti news agency on Tuesday that four large landing vessels were on their way to the Mediterranean near Syria, three weeks after the Russian navy conducted its biggest maneuvers in the region since the breakup of the Soviet Union. "Based on the results of the Navy exercises in the Black and Mediterranean seas from Jan. 19 through Jan. 29 ... the Ministry leadership has taken a decision to continue combat duty by Russian warships in the Mediterranean," the ministry said in its statement.
WORLD
February 18, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected and updated. See the notes below for details.
MOSCOW -- Russian scientists declared Monday that they have found and established the composition of pieces of the meteor that exploded over the Chelyabinsk region last week, injuring hundreds of people and causing millions of dollars worth of damage. Over the weekend, 53 tiny pieces of dark porous material were collected near Chebarkul Lake, 60 miles west of Chelyabinsk, the regional center, officials said. The biggest of the finds was 7 millimeters long. The samples were without doubt meteorites, Viktor Grokhovsky, a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences meteorite committee, said early Monday.
SCIENCE
February 24, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
A plant that was frozen in Siberian permafrost for about 30,000 years has been revived by a team of Russian scientists - and borne fruit, to boot. Using tissue from immature fruits buried in fossil squirrel burrows some 90 feet below the surface, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences in Pushchino managed to coax the frozen remains of a Silene stenophylla specimen into full flower, producing delicate white blooms and then fruit. The findings, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, describe what is a record for reviving presumably dead plant tissue - and may provide clues as to what makes some plants hardier and longer-lived than others.
WORLD
July 8, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A Russian scientist serving a 15-year prison sentence on charges of spying for U. S. intelligence services says he and other Russian prisoners will be swapped in the next few days for the members of the alleged Russian spy ring recently arrested in the United States, his family said Wednesday. Igor Sutyagin, a former researcher for the Moscow-based USA and Canada Institute think tank, was flown to Moscow from a prison camp near the Arctic Circle, where he has been serving a 15-year sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vladimir Sergeevich Syromyatnikov, 73, the veteran Russian space scientist whose docking system linked the Soviet Soyuz and the U.S. Apollo space capsules in the 1970s, a system that is still in use, died of leukemia Sept. 19 in Moscow. Syromyatnikov worked for Energia Space Research Corp. in the space program since before Sputnik first orbited the Earth.
WORLD
December 24, 2002 | From Associated Press
A commuter plane carrying Ukrainian and Russian aerospace scientists crashed in central Iran on Monday, killing all 46 people aboard, Iranian officials said. The passengers were traveling to Iran to witness the maiden flight of a joint Ukrainian- and Iranian-built passenger plane, according to a report on state-run television.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its glory days, the scientific center in this wooded Moscow suburb produced designs for sophisticated microelectronic components of the Soviet lunar vehicle and futuristic weapons that fueled the superpower arms race. Now its biggest project is laying off half its staff. The orders from the Soviet military-industrial complex, which poured into Zelenograd for three decades, have all but evaporated because of cuts in defense spending.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian scientists have been ordered to report all professional contacts with foreigners in a move apparently aimed at reimposing Soviet-style controls on science, a prominent human rights campaigner said Thursday.
WORLD
June 28, 2002 | From Reuters
Rescuers took advantage of moderate weather Thursday to evacuate 21 Russian scientists trapped deep in antarctic waters and said an icebreaker on the way should be able to free their ship. Tanya Hacker of the Cape Town-based Dutch salvage company Smit Marine said two helicopters had flown from the heated deck of the South African research ship Agulhas as soon as the wind moderated. "Both helicopters are back on the ship.
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