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NEWS
November 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Russia's celebrated mission to Mars failed early today shortly after the rocket blasted off into space, the military space forces said. The failure is a serious setback for the struggling Russian space program, which was counting on the Mars '96 probe to give it a new lease on life. Space force officials refused immediate explanation of what went wrong after the four-stage Proton booster lifted off late Saturday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Interfax news agency said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vladimir Sergeevich Syromyatnikov, 73, the veteran Russian space scientist whose docking system linked the Soviet Soyuz and the U.S. Apollo space capsules in the 1970s, a system that is still in use, died of leukemia Sept. 19 in Moscow. Syromyatnikov worked for Energia Space Research Corp. in the space program since before Sputnik first orbited the Earth.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vladimir Sergeevich Syromyatnikov, 73, the veteran Russian space scientist whose docking system linked the Soviet Soyuz and the U.S. Apollo space capsules in the 1970s, a system that is still in use, died of leukemia Sept. 19 in Moscow. Syromyatnikov worked for Energia Space Research Corp. in the space program since before Sputnik first orbited the Earth.
NEWS
November 3, 2002 | Mara D. Bellaby, Associated Press Writer
Ivan Pozdayev and his classmates at the International Space School in this Russian military enclave ignite a model rocket made from Coca-Cola bottles and grin as it soars high over the treetops. But Ivan, 12, frowns when asked if he wants to be a cosmonaut. A rocket scientist, then? He shrugs. "Maybe."
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the pale sunlight of an icy desert dawn, a Russian Soyuz rocket was hoisted smoothly onto its launch pad Sunday, ready to blast the first American cosmonaut into space. In a landmark of post-Cold War cooperation, U.S. astronaut Norman E. Thagard, who has spent a year in Russia preparing for the mission, is scheduled to lift off tonight with two Russian cosmonauts bound for the Mir space station.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may not be NASA's favorite flier, but as American "space tourist" Dennis Tito finishes the seventh day of his cosmic odyssey today, he has become a respected member of the collective to his Russian crew mates and their associates on the ground. Defending the Los Angeles multimillionaire against NASA's sniping has turned into a matter of principle for the Russians involved with the Soyuz TM-32 mission that last Saturday launched Tito on his way to the International Space Station.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Russia's beleaguered space program on the line, a rookie cosmonaut aboard the Mir orbiting station guided an unmanned, supply-laden freighter to a safe docking by remote control Friday after it twice failed to land on autopilot. The tricky linkup by Lt. Col. Yuri Malenchenko, a first in Moscow's annals of space achievement, saved $60 million worth of research equipment, food and supplies for scheduled manned missions with the European Space Agency next month and the United States in March.
NEWS
November 3, 2002 | Mara D. Bellaby, Associated Press Writer
Ivan Pozdayev and his classmates at the International Space School in this Russian military enclave ignite a model rocket made from Coca-Cola bottles and grin as it soars high over the treetops. But Ivan, 12, frowns when asked if he wants to be a cosmonaut. A rocket scientist, then? He shrugs. "Maybe."
WORLD
November 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin began a six-hour spacewalk by hitting a golf ball into Earth's orbit from the International Space Station to raise money for the Russian space program. Tyurin, the station's flight engineer, made a one-armed swat with a gold-plated six-iron. The ball was expected to circle Earth at least 48 times before it burned up in the atmosphere. He spent 16 minutes setting up the shot off a ladder. Canadian golf club maker Element 21 Golf Co.
NEWS
February 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction of the international space station, scheduled to begin with a Russian flight in November, could be delayed once again because the Russian space program is broke. The Russians had said previously they were eight months behind on a service module that was scheduled to be launched in April 1998. But statements made in Moscow by Yuri Koptev, head of the Russian Space Agency, indicated the Russians may not be able to meet their date for launch of a guidance and control module.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may not be NASA's favorite flier, but as American "space tourist" Dennis Tito finishes the seventh day of his cosmic odyssey today, he has become a respected member of the collective to his Russian crew mates and their associates on the ground. Defending the Los Angeles multimillionaire against NASA's sniping has turned into a matter of principle for the Russians involved with the Soyuz TM-32 mission that last Saturday launched Tito on his way to the International Space Station.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Russia's celebrated mission to Mars failed early today shortly after the rocket blasted off into space, the military space forces said. The failure is a serious setback for the struggling Russian space program, which was counting on the Mars '96 probe to give it a new lease on life. Space force officials refused immediate explanation of what went wrong after the four-stage Proton booster lifted off late Saturday from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Interfax news agency said.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the pale sunlight of an icy desert dawn, a Russian Soyuz rocket was hoisted smoothly onto its launch pad Sunday, ready to blast the first American cosmonaut into space. In a landmark of post-Cold War cooperation, U.S. astronaut Norman E. Thagard, who has spent a year in Russia preparing for the mission, is scheduled to lift off tonight with two Russian cosmonauts bound for the Mir space station.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Russia's beleaguered space program on the line, a rookie cosmonaut aboard the Mir orbiting station guided an unmanned, supply-laden freighter to a safe docking by remote control Friday after it twice failed to land on autopilot. The tricky linkup by Lt. Col. Yuri Malenchenko, a first in Moscow's annals of space achievement, saved $60 million worth of research equipment, food and supplies for scheduled manned missions with the European Space Agency next month and the United States in March.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010
Lawrence Weschler's Wonder Cabinet Writer, critic, professor and artist Lawrence Weschler will present a full day of music, film and more, illuminating the intersection of science and art. Presentations will include an illustrated life of Marie Curie, the mystical origins of the Russian space program and a performance by sleight-of-hand master Ricky Jay. Occidental College, 1600 Campus Road, Eagle Rock. 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Sat. Free. (323) 259-2500. http://www.oxy.edu.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | From Reuters
Russia is finally set to launch the living quarters of the International Space Station two years after it was scheduled to go into orbit, but U.S. space managers said Wednesday the wait was not all bad. They said the long delay, caused by money problems in the cash-strapped Russian space program, enabled the former Cold War adversaries to share knowledge collected during more than four decades of space exploration.
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