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Russian Spies

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NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Brush passes. Dead drops. Secret electronic messages. All under the watchful eye of the FBI. Documents released Monday, including photos, videos and papers, offered new details about the FBI's decade-long investigation into a ring of Russian sleeper agents who, U.S. officials say, were trying to burrow their way into American society to learn secrets from people in power. The investigation was code-named Operation Ghost Stories because six of the 10 agents had assumed the identities of dead people.
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WORLD
July 6, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Seeking to make a political point, a group of Russian lawmakers is initiating a request to seek extradition from the United States of a Russian intelligence officer,  Col. Alexander Poteyev, who escaped to America in 2010 after betraying a major network of Russian spies in the U.S. The lawmakers are comparing the case of Poteyev to that of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who remains holed up in a Moscow airport, having requested asylum in...
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NEWS
October 9, 1989 | from Associated Press
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is placing advertisements in a Russian-language newspaper in hopes of catching spies and attracting the attention of potential defectors, according to a published report. The New York Times reported in today's editions that the FBI has begun running daily display advertisements in Novoye Russkoye Slovo, or New Russian Word, asking readers to share information about Soviet spies operating here and abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
FX's "The Americans" was inspired by a true-life incident: The arrest in 2010 of 10 people who allegedly spied for Russia for up to 10 years while posing as ordinary civilians. The drama stars Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as Russian spies posing as a suburban Washington couple in 1981. Joe Weisberg, an executive producer on the show, said Wednesday that the timing of the show was key, that a series like "The Americans'" would not have been possible during the height of the Cold War. "Trying to tell a story about Al Qaeda now would be pretty much impossible now," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
FX's "The Americans" was inspired by a true-life incident: The arrest in 2010 of 10 people who allegedly spied for Russia for up to 10 years while posing as ordinary civilians. The drama stars Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as Russian spies posing as a suburban Washington couple in 1981. Joe Weisberg, an executive producer on the show, said Wednesday that the timing of the show was key, that a series like "The Americans'" would not have been possible during the height of the Cold War. "Trying to tell a story about Al Qaeda now would be pretty much impossible now," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik
Can the Cold War make a comeback? Not the real Cold War, but the one at the multiplex, where Russian spies are American agents who are really Russian spies working for a super-secret international coalition. This weekend, "Salt" will try to do just that, as Angelina Jolie plays a well-reputed CIA agent who, after being accused of working for the KGB, goes on the run in a violent spree that alternately confirms both her innocence and her enemies' accusations. The Phillip Noyce film, which is being released by Sony Pictures, harks back to twisty Cold War thrillers like " "No Way Out" -- who works for the Russians and who for the Americans?
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Alexandra Jinjikhashvili and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The personal photographer for Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili and two others were charged Saturday with spying for Russia, officials said, as a cold war between the two countries showed no signs of abating. Saakashvili photographer Irakli Gedenidze, Foreign Ministry photographer Giorgi Abdaladze and European Pressphoto Agency photographer Zurab Kurtsikidze had been arrested Thursday. Their lawyers said Saturday that the espionage trial may start as early as Sept. 1. Russia and Georgia, a former Soviet republic, fought a brief war in August 2008, and diplomatic relations between the two countries have been severed since then.
WORLD
July 6, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Seeking to make a political point, a group of Russian lawmakers is initiating a request to seek extradition from the United States of a Russian intelligence officer,  Col. Alexander Poteyev, who escaped to America in 2010 after betraying a major network of Russian spies in the U.S. The lawmakers are comparing the case of Poteyev to that of NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who remains holed up in a Moscow airport, having requested asylum in...
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | Associated Press
Russia's Security Ministry, the successor to the KGB, admitted Wednesday that the country's spies are defecting to the West in growing numbers.
WORLD
December 27, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A man accused of being a Russian spy while pretending to be a Canadian was deported to his homeland, officials said. Canadian Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day said the man, who went by the name Paul William Hampel in Canada, left the country under close supervision. The Canada Border Services Agency took Hampel into custody Nov. 14 after finding that his Ontario birth certificate was fraudulent.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Brush passes. Dead drops. Secret electronic messages. All under the watchful eye of the FBI. Documents released Monday, including photos, videos and papers, offered new details about the FBI's decade-long investigation into a ring of Russian sleeper agents who, U.S. officials say, were trying to burrow their way into American society to learn secrets from people in power. The investigation was code-named Operation Ghost Stories because six of the 10 agents had assumed the identities of dead people.
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Alexandra Jinjikhashvili and Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
The personal photographer for Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili and two others were charged Saturday with spying for Russia, officials said, as a cold war between the two countries showed no signs of abating. Saakashvili photographer Irakli Gedenidze, Foreign Ministry photographer Giorgi Abdaladze and European Pressphoto Agency photographer Zurab Kurtsikidze had been arrested Thursday. Their lawyers said Saturday that the espionage trial may start as early as Sept. 1. Russia and Georgia, a former Soviet republic, fought a brief war in August 2008, and diplomatic relations between the two countries have been severed since then.
WORLD
November 12, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A high-ranking intelligence officer betrayed Russia by exposing a secret spy ring operating in the United States until June and defecting, a newspaper reported Thursday. The officer, identified only as Col. Shcherbakov, was instrumental in the high-profile arrests of Russian spies in New York, Boston, Virginia, New Jersey and Cyprus, according to a cover story in the Moscow-based Kommersant daily. Shcherbakov, who the paper said handled the spy ring in the United States, reportedly left Russia shortly before U.S. officials announced the arrests in June.
WORLD
October 22, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Two weeks ago, she turned up at the launch of a rocket carrying two cosmonauts and an American astronaut to the International Space Station. On Monday, she appeared at the Kremlin, along with her nine fellow spies deported from the U.S., to receive Russia's highest honor from President Dmitry Medvedev. And on Thursday, her image graced the glossy cover of the Russian edition of Maxim magazine. She was clad in lacy black underwear, with a big gun in her hand. Talk about exposure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik
Can the Cold War make a comeback? Not the real Cold War, but the one at the multiplex, where Russian spies are American agents who are really Russian spies working for a super-secret international coalition. This weekend, "Salt" will try to do just that, as Angelina Jolie plays a well-reputed CIA agent who, after being accused of working for the KGB, goes on the run in a violent spree that alternately confirms both her innocence and her enemies' accusations. The Phillip Noyce film, which is being released by Sony Pictures, harks back to twisty Cold War thrillers like " "No Way Out" -- who works for the Russians and who for the Americans?
OPINION
July 3, 2010 | By Lionel Beehner
Glamour! Intrigue! Sex! Those are among the buzzwords making the headlines this week after the arrests of 11 members of an alleged Russian spy ring operating in the United States. None of that was part of my brief run-in with a Russian undercover agent a few years back. There was nobody passing me orange duffle bags on subway platforms, as alleged in the current case. No invisible ink messages or high-tech coded ones. No identity theft of any dead Canadians. It all started with a call from a man who said he was a Russian journalist.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Ten people have been arrested for allegedly serving as secret agents of the Russian government in the United States, the Justice Department said Monday. Eight of 10 were arrested Sunday for allegedly carrying out long-term, deep cover assignments in the United States on behalf of Russia. Two others were arrested for allegedly participating in the same Russian intelligence program within the United States. Their job, according to the court papers in the case, was "to search and develop ties in policymaking circles" in the United States.
OPINION
July 1, 2010
The FBI rolled up a Russian spy ring in suburban America just days after President Dmitry Medvedev tooled around Silicon Valley, netting an iPhone 4 from Apple's Steve Jobs and a promised $1-billion investment from Cisco Systems. The leader of the United States' Cold War foe then chowed down on cheeseburgers with President Obama in Arlington, Va., at a diner blocks from the apartment of one of the alleged secret agents. Agents, by the way, who apparently never sent home any secrets. John LeCarre might have discarded this story as beggaring belief, but it's a true-life collision of past and present relations with Moscow.
WORLD
July 2, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
It was the only choice of headline, really: "The spy who loved me." The country that gave the world James Bond is now abuzz about a bewildered trainee psychologist who was apparently once married to the femme fatale of an alleged Russian spy ring. The Daily Telegraph devoted most of its front page to a photo and exclusive interview with Alex Chapman about his relationship with Anna Chapman, 28, whose sexy photos made her the star defendant of the 10 people arrested on suspicion of being undercover agents.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2010 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
One of 11 people charged with being part of a Russian spy ring told investigators that his loyalty to his handlers exceeded his commitment to his own son, prosecutors said Thursday as they argued against releasing the defendants on bond and warned that evidence unveiled so far was "the tip of an iceberg." Three of the accused spies appeared in federal court in Manhattan before Magistrate Ronald L. Ellis, who denied bail for a couple who went by the names Richard and Cynthia Murphy.
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