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NEWS
September 17, 1995 | From Associated Press
Concerned about a population decline, the region surrounding Russia's fourth-largest city has begun offering cash rewards to women who bear children. The modest payments are not likely to make female residents of Nizhny Novgorod want to rush out and get pregnant, however. Under a newly issued regional decree reported Saturday by the Itar-Tass news agency, mothers will be paid the equivalent of $225 for their first child and $292 for their second.
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WORLD
October 3, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW - Russia evacuated its diplomatic community from Libya on Thursday following an attack on its embassy in Tripoli, and said it was relocating its Libyan mission to Tunisia until conditions were safe. “On Oct. 3, all the employees of the Russian Embassy and their family members safely crossed the border with Tunisia,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said in an official statement. “Until the security issues related to the work of our mission in Tripoli are resolved, a group of senior diplomats of the Russian Embassy in Libya will temporarily remain in Tunisia.” Lukashevich said the others will be flown to Moscow on Friday.
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NEWS
April 29, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A curvaceous Cindy Crawford graces the glossy cover, and the Cyrillic headline reads, "Sex or chocolate? A time for everything." Sixty thousand copies of the first Russian edition of Cosmopolitan magazine hit the streets of Moscow and St. Petersburg on Thursday.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Russian evacuees from war-torn Syria, mostly women and children with worried eyes, emerged Wednesday from two government airplanes into the predawn chill of the Moscow winter. Several spoke of the mounting hardships in their adopted country - and of an uncertain fate in a motherland they have not known for years. Many of the 77 evacuees had departed Russia a decade or more ago after marrying Syrian men who had gone to Russia to study or work and then returned home with loved ones.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1996 | LYNN BERRY, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
A lovely Russian woman tries on a sporty Italian mink jacket and smiles as she swirls in front of the mirror. Then she hangs up the fur and walks away. Too costly? No, just not quite the right size. "Three thousand [dollars] is not expensive--of course not," says Irina Vronkevich, a 27-year-old former model who stopped working when she married a Russian businessman. Vronkevich is among a growing number of Russian women who drape themselves in furs for the long winter.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, the unidentified corpses rolled by on the video: distorted faces, burned bodies, limbs missing. Valentina Kadashnikova studied each soldier, each scar and mole, looking for her son in the last place she hoped to find him. For three years, Kadashnikova had searched for her Vasily, missing since February 1995, early in the Chechen war.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lyudmila Zakharevich, 16, tops her class at an elite Moscow high school, but instead of planning a career, she dreams of becoming a full-time housewife. Lena Guzeeva, 22, on the other hand, desperately wants a professional position in one of the new private businesses in her central Russian city but worries that sexual exploitation has become so accepted that she will be jobless unless she agrees to submit to a potential employer's advances.
NEWS
February 11, 2007 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
Dressed in black, Vladimir Rakovsky glides around with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lighted room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1987
I was very interested in seeing the picture of the dancers in Moscow's Gorky Park (Part I, Nov. 1). There were dozens and dozens of onlookers, but only one woman was wearing slacks, one of the dancers. Considering that the media is always telling us how dowdy Russian women are, I can only say that a picture taken of such an event in this country would show at least two-thirds of the women wearing baggy pants. I know I can't believe everything I read, but I can believe what I see, so it isn't really the Russian women who are dowdy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991
If director Fred Schepisi wanted to keep Connery (despite his age) then he should have gotten Helen Mirren to play opposite him. Pfeiffer did not look like any of the Russian women in my former country. Her face is definitely lovely, but not Slavic. LEV PLEMIANNIKOV Los Angeles
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Russian evacuees from war-torn Syria, mostly worried-looking women and children, emerged from two government airplanes Wednesday into the predawn chill of the Moscow winter. Several of the evacuees spoke of the mounting hardships in their adopted country, and of an uncertain fate in a motherland they have not known for years. Many of them left Russia a decade or more ago after marrying Syrian men who had come to Russia to study or work. Now their families were escaping danger in a Syria they had come to love.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- A group of Russian warships was en route to the Mediterranean Sea on Tuesday with the possible mission to evacuate citizens of their nation from Syria, the Russian news agency Interfax reported Tuesday. The Baltic Fleet frigate Yaroslav Mudry and landing ships Kaliningrad and Alexander Shabalin, accompanied by tanker Lena and a towboat, were heading to Syria in an operation that "was prepared in certain haste and was kept in grave secret,” a source in the Russian navy told Interfax.
NEWS
November 11, 2009 | Reuters
Britons are among the ugliest people in the world, according to a dating website that says it only allows "beautiful people" to join. Fewer than one in eight British men and just three in 20 women who have applied to BeautifulPeople.com have been accepted, an emailed statement from the website showed. Existing members of the "elite dating site" rate how attractive potential members are over a 48 hour period, after applicants upload a recent photo and personal profile. Swedish men have proved the most successful, with 65 percent being accepted, while Norwegian women are considered the most beautiful with 76 percent accepted, the website said.
NEWS
February 11, 2007 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
Dressed in black, Vladimir Rakovsky glides around with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lighted room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men.
SPORTS
February 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Evgenia Medvedeva-Abruzova made up a 12 1/2 -second deficit on the leading Germans with her final leg to lift Russia to the gold in the women's 4x5-kilometer cross-country relay in Pragelato. After taking over the lead, Medvedeva-Abruzova skated all alone through the final stretch to finish in a time of 54 minutes, 47.7 seconds.
SPORTS
August 28, 2005 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
It was a perfect moment for a line and Andy Roddick's timing and delivery were almost impeccable after he'd won the U.S. Open in 2003. "No more, 'What's it feel like to be the future of American tennis [stuff],' " he said as he took a seat in the interview room. The newly crowned champion had a point. Not only had he been asked the question, directly and indirectly, almost daily, but it seemed as though Roddick alone was shouldering the burden of American tennis.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal investigators confirmed they are looking into adoption agencies that bring Russian women to Louisiana to bear children for adoption in the United States. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Services said it is conducting a criminal investigation but refused to identify its subjects.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glass breaking, overturning furniture, muffled thuds. A woman screaming from a downstairs apartment: "I'm being killed! I'm being killed!" It's midnight, and three floors up, in a cozy kitchen with a kettle on the boil and pipes gurgling behind the curtains, neighbor Tania Kucherenko shrugs off any suggestion that she should call the police. "It's the same every Saturday night. The husband comes home drunk and beats her.
SPORTS
March 14, 2005 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
So, just who is this 18-year-old who Sunday posted the biggest upset so far in the Pacific Life Open tennis tournament, beating the No. 2 women's player in the world, Amelie Mauresmo of France? Fasten your seat belt. Her name is Evgenia Linetskaya, she is from Moscow, and her 2-6, 6-2, 7-5 win on center court shouldn't have been that big a shocker, because she is ranked No. 44 and was seeded No. 30 here.
SPORTS
January 16, 2005 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
This can happen when a house is left unoccupied too long. It may not come to pass right away, taking a few weeks or even months, but eventually someone is going to take up residence and begin changing the wallpaper and rearranging the furniture. Or walking off with trophies. Women's tennis turned into Russia House in 2004, after Venus and Serena Williams vacated the premises and Belgians Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne left after only a short stay.
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