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January 28, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
As the Iron Curtain collapses in Eastern Europe, the Ice Curtain is rapidly melting in the Bering Strait separating Alaska and the Soviet Far East. Slammed shut by Stalin in 1948, the back door to the Soviet Union--through Siberia and into the United States through Alaska--is opening in a dramatic fashion. Until recently the mysterious Soviet Far East, one of the most isolated and least-known places on Earth, had been off limits to all foreigners.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard A. Pierce, 86, one of the foremost authorities on Russian Alaska, died Sept. 14 at his home in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, said his daughter, Catherine. The cause of death was not disclosed. Pierce was a professor of history at Queen's University in Kingston and at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard A. Pierce, 86, one of the foremost authorities on Russian Alaska, died Sept. 14 at his home in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, said his daughter, Catherine. The cause of death was not disclosed. Pierce was a professor of history at Queen's University in Kingston and at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
As the Iron Curtain collapses in Eastern Europe, the Ice Curtain is rapidly melting in the Bering Strait separating Alaska and the Soviet Far East. Slammed shut by Stalin in 1948, the back door to the Soviet Union--through Siberia and into the United States through Alaska--is opening in a dramatic fashion. Until recently the mysterious Soviet Far East, one of the most isolated and least-known places on Earth, had been off limits to all foreigners.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2010 | By Dick Jordan
Musical interlude Violinist Paul Rosenthal visited Sitka in 1972. He thought it would be an ideal place to hold an informal reunion with fellow musicians, so he raised money to fly them in and stage the town's first Summer Music Festival. They performed without pay; proceeds from ticket sales barely covered their return flights. Each year since, 18 to 35 professional musicians from throughout the world come to Sitka for three weeks in June to make music as beautiful and dramatic as the scenery.
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