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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Reporter John Johnson is walking Ventura Boulevard--exploring the slick and the schlock from Studio City to Woodland Hills
The melting pot was bubbling at Moscow Nights, a Studio City restaurant and nightclub catering to the growing Soviet immigrant community. The crowd of 300 hoisted full glasses of vodka and toasted America, freedom and the health of Valery Moiseyev. A former Moscow Circus comedian, Moiseyev was celebrating his birthday by ridiculing the communist system from which he escaped 12 years ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2009 | Karen Leano
For at least one day this weekend, fans looking for the latest films from Mother Russia won't have to badger the staff at West Hollywood's several Russian video stores or settle for pirated DVDs. The first Russian Winter Festival is bringing to L.A. a rare influx of the latest features, documentaries and shorts straight from that country's vibrant film industry to the James Bridges Theater at UCLA.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty-four-year-old Shasha Tolmachoff lives in Glendale, Ariz., but plans that when she dies, she will be buried in the City of Commerce, in the same dusty parcel where generations of Russian Molokans including her parents and in-laws have been laid to rest. "It's very comforting to be with them," said the retired homemaker as she walked gingerly around the tightly packed tombstones at the Russian Molokan Cemetery on Slauson Avenue after attending the funeral of an elderly church member.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
AS its subtitle suggests, this engaging book, translated from its author's mother tongue, Russian, into clear, elegant English, is sweeping in its scope. Clearly someone unafraid of biting off a lot, Solomon Volkov has done justice to his subject. Readers of his passionate study, "Shostakovich and Stalin," will not be surprised at the enormously high level of engagement he brings to this latest enterprise. The good news for them is that, four years on, he has shed some of the hothouse, insiderish manner that at times rendered the earlier book somewhat inaccessible to those less informed than he is about all things Russian.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | GINGER LYNNE THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
They weren't fighting in the streets and, in fact, West Hollywood's American and Russian-immigrant communities rarely quarreled. But maybe they should have, thought Zigmund Vays--at least there would have been some meaningful interaction. Instead, many of the city's 5,000 Soviet immigrants, mostly Jewish senior citizens who found it difficult to learn English and adjust to this country's culture, avoided contact with Americans, forming small "cultural ghettos," Vays said.
SPORTS
October 7, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The Clippers, here for training camp and two exhibition games with Russian teams, started their week with some sightseeing the morning after their arrival. The team piled out of a tour bus Sunday at St. Basil's Cathedral, on Red Square, with about half of the players looking sleepy and jet-lagged. Most of the others, perhaps more excited about seeing Moscow, toted cameras and snapped away at the cathedral's brightly colored onion domes and the nearby Kremlin towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
AS its subtitle suggests, this engaging book, translated from its author's mother tongue, Russian, into clear, elegant English, is sweeping in its scope. Clearly someone unafraid of biting off a lot, Solomon Volkov has done justice to his subject. Readers of his passionate study, "Shostakovich and Stalin," will not be surprised at the enormously high level of engagement he brings to this latest enterprise. The good news for them is that, four years on, he has shed some of the hothouse, insiderish manner that at times rendered the earlier book somewhat inaccessible to those less informed than he is about all things Russian.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2009 | Karen Leano
For at least one day this weekend, fans looking for the latest films from Mother Russia won't have to badger the staff at West Hollywood's several Russian video stores or settle for pirated DVDs. The first Russian Winter Festival is bringing to L.A. a rare influx of the latest features, documentaries and shorts straight from that country's vibrant film industry to the James Bridges Theater at UCLA.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jabbing her twig broom between meandering tourists and staggering drunks, Rima Radionova attacked the day's debris, with each stroke expressing her anger and frustration. The sticky ice-cream wrappers, limp banana peels and crumpled soda cans piled high in her garbage can reminded her of the White Nights Festival--a celebration of summer from which she, like many other Russians, felt excluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | Henry Turner, Special to The Times
Stas Namin is something of a Russian phenomenon -- businessman, filmmaker, music and television producer, photographer -- and those are just his sidelines. In the '70s and '80s, he was one of Russia's biggest rock stars; his group Flowers sold 60 million records. Branded a dissident by Soviet authorities, he was forbidden to leave Russia until perestroika. Later he toured the world, playing with Frank Zappa, Bon Jovi and Kenny Loggins, and collaborating on an album with Keith Richards.
SPORTS
October 7, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The Clippers, here for training camp and two exhibition games with Russian teams, started their week with some sightseeing the morning after their arrival. The team piled out of a tour bus Sunday at St. Basil's Cathedral, on Red Square, with about half of the players looking sleepy and jet-lagged. Most of the others, perhaps more excited about seeing Moscow, toted cameras and snapped away at the cathedral's brightly colored onion domes and the nearby Kremlin towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2003 | Henry Turner, Special to The Times
Stas Namin is something of a Russian phenomenon -- businessman, filmmaker, music and television producer, photographer -- and those are just his sidelines. In the '70s and '80s, he was one of Russia's biggest rock stars; his group Flowers sold 60 million records. Branded a dissident by Soviet authorities, he was forbidden to leave Russia until perestroika. Later he toured the world, playing with Frank Zappa, Bon Jovi and Kenny Loggins, and collaborating on an album with Keith Richards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty-four-year-old Shasha Tolmachoff lives in Glendale, Ariz., but plans that when she dies, she will be buried in the City of Commerce, in the same dusty parcel where generations of Russian Molokans including her parents and in-laws have been laid to rest. "It's very comforting to be with them," said the retired homemaker as she walked gingerly around the tightly packed tombstones at the Russian Molokan Cemetery on Slauson Avenue after attending the funeral of an elderly church member.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1995 | YEVGENIA BORISOVA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With an infusion of American expertise and cash, the Getty Conservation Institute on Wednesday embarked on a quest to resuscitate Russia's second city by protecting its historic buildings and priceless art collections from fire, theft and the ravages of time. An arm of the J. Paul Getty Trust, the Los Angeles-based institute teamed up with the St.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is man's relationship to nature? To God? To other human beings and to himself? Andrei Bitov, one of Russia's most gifted avant-garde writers, addresses all these issues in "The Monkey Link," but neither the questions nor the answers are easy to discern. For one thing, Bitov began this novel in the early 1970s, during the Brezhnev freeze, when only canny indirection could save him from exile or worse (though even then, his works were banned in the Soviet Union).
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jabbing her twig broom between meandering tourists and staggering drunks, Rima Radionova attacked the day's debris, with each stroke expressing her anger and frustration. The sticky ice-cream wrappers, limp banana peels and crumpled soda cans piled high in her garbage can reminded her of the White Nights Festival--a celebration of summer from which she, like many other Russians, felt excluded.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | MICHAEL HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is man's relationship to nature? To God? To other human beings and to himself? Andrei Bitov, one of Russia's most gifted avant-garde writers, addresses all these issues in "The Monkey Link," but neither the questions nor the answers are easy to discern. For one thing, Bitov began this novel in the early 1970s, during the Brezhnev freeze, when only canny indirection could save him from exile or worse (though even then, his works were banned in the Soviet Union).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1995 | YEVGENIA BORISOVA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With an infusion of American expertise and cash, the Getty Conservation Institute on Wednesday embarked on a quest to resuscitate Russia's second city by protecting its historic buildings and priceless art collections from fire, theft and the ravages of time. An arm of the J. Paul Getty Trust, the Los Angeles-based institute teamed up with the St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Reporter John Johnson is walking Ventura Boulevard--exploring the slick and the schlock from Studio City to Woodland Hills
The melting pot was bubbling at Moscow Nights, a Studio City restaurant and nightclub catering to the growing Soviet immigrant community. The crowd of 300 hoisted full glasses of vodka and toasted America, freedom and the health of Valery Moiseyev. A former Moscow Circus comedian, Moiseyev was celebrating his birthday by ridiculing the communist system from which he escaped 12 years ago.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | GINGER LYNNE THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
They weren't fighting in the streets and, in fact, West Hollywood's American and Russian-immigrant communities rarely quarreled. But maybe they should have, thought Zigmund Vays--at least there would have been some meaningful interaction. Instead, many of the city's 5,000 Soviet immigrants, mostly Jewish senior citizens who found it difficult to learn English and adjust to this country's culture, avoided contact with Americans, forming small "cultural ghettos," Vays said.
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