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BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a stuffy U.S. classroom, two dozen shirt-sleeved Soviet managers puzzle over a peculiar capitalist custom: putting products on sale. "Do they have to sell it at the price advertised?" wonders one of the middle-aged students. Demands another: "How long do they have to keep it at the sale price?" Welcome to Capitalism 101--or something like it--at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, where a group of Soviets is getting a close-up view of free enterprise this summer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In many ways, the symphony orchestra is the ultimate European art band. Not surprisingly then, most of the major orchestras in the United States are led by European conductors in European repertory. Franz Welser-Most, the recently appointed music director of the Cleveland Orchestra, suggested that one of the reasons that these transatlantic marriages are often so successful is that the American musicians deliver awesome technical power while the European conductor gives them aesthetic direction.
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NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snitching some cake from a table in the teachers' lounge, 11-year-old Sasha Terentyve wriggles onto the sofa, settling himself between a physicist and an archeologist as he flips through a book on Greece. A short, sandy-haired boy with a mischievous grin, Sasha now considers the intellectuals his close friends. He's also on hugging terms with actors, astronomers and artists--all of whom double as teachers in Moscow's experimental School of Art, Culture and Freedom.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snitching some cake from a table in the teachers' lounge, 11-year-old Sasha Terentyve wriggles onto the sofa, settling himself between a physicist and an archeologist as he flips through a book on Greece. A short, sandy-haired boy with a mischievous grin, Sasha now considers the intellectuals his close friends. He's also on hugging terms with actors, astronomers and artists--all of whom double as teachers in Moscow's experimental School of Art, Culture and Freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In many ways, the symphony orchestra is the ultimate European art band. Not surprisingly then, most of the major orchestras in the United States are led by European conductors in European repertory. Franz Welser-Most, the recently appointed music director of the Cleveland Orchestra, suggested that one of the reasons that these transatlantic marriages are often so successful is that the American musicians deliver awesome technical power while the European conductor gives them aesthetic direction.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a stuffy U.S. classroom, two dozen shirt-sleeved Soviet managers puzzle over a peculiar capitalist custom: putting products on sale. "Do they have to sell it at the price advertised?" wonders one of the middle-aged students. Demands another: "How long do they have to keep it at the sale price?" Welcome to Capitalism 101--or something like it--at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, where a group of Soviets is getting a close-up view of free enterprise this summer.
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