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August 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Russian minority in the Baltic republic of Estonia went on the offensive Wednesday with scattered strikes at factories and shipyards, protesting efforts by Estonian activists to sever the republic politically and economically from Moscow. The action demonstrated the growing anger of the Russians, who have held the reins of power in the Soviet Union ever since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution but who have been criticized by many of the country's more than 100 ethnic minorities.
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NEWS
July 16, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian diplomats and lawmakers reacted with outrage Friday to a U.S. Senate vote linking aid to Russia to the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia by Aug. 31. Senior Russian diplomat Vitaly S. Churkin denounced the U.S. attempt to pressure Russia into removing remnants of the occupying Red Army from its Baltic neighbor as "counterproductive and wrong," while the lower house of Parliament condemned it as unwarranted meddling in Russia's affairs. Foreign Minister Andrei V.
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NEWS
March 15, 1989
Thousands of Russians and other non-Estonians marched in Tallinn and threatened a general strike if the Communist Party doesn't stem Estonian nationalism and "creeping counterrevolution," journalists in the republic's capital said. State-owned Estonian Radio put the number of demonstrators at 30,000 while organizers claimed from 80,000 to 100,000, Finnish radio reported. The protest was organized by Interfront, a group dominated by ethnic Russians.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the world's great powers embraced him as a near-equal at their summit Sunday, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin demanded better economic treatment from abroad and bluntly denied that he plans to withdraw his last troops from the Baltics.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia said it will take economic and political reprisals against Estonia for adopting a law that Moscow says discriminates against ethnic Russians living there. "Estonia has stepped out . . . on the road of apartheid since a third of its population have been declared aliens," Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev declared, referring to about 600,000 Russians living in the Baltic state. Deputy Foreign Minister Vitaly I.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Parliament will reconsider a citizenship law that classifies most Russians as foreigners after President Lennart Meri refused Wednesday to sign the controversial bill. "I have taken this step after much deliberation," the president said in a nationwide television address Wednesday evening. "I want to be sure that all the people in Estonia will be treated fairly."
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, seeking to calm an explosive issue that has fanned extremist nationalism in Russia, called on the governments of the three Baltic republics Wednesday to give better treatment to their embattled ethnic Russian minorities. "We urge the Latvian government and the other governments to act generously on this issue," Christopher said after meeting with the foreign ministers of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. "We want to pursue this issue very vigorously."
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | From Reuters
The Estonian Parliament backed down in a dispute with the Kremlin on Thursday, suspending clauses in a local election law that deprived thousands of Russian immigrants of the vote. Estonian radio said 172 of the 243 deputies accepted a proposal by the republic's president, Arnold Ruutel, to suspend provisions of the law that allowed only people who had lived in the republic for at least two years to vote.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Estonian bank of the River Narva, a tall white castle built by Danes in the 13th Century still guards this ancient city. Glowering straight back at it from the river's eastern bank is the imposing gray Fortress of Ivangorod, which was built by Czar Ivan III three centuries later and still marks the beginning of Russian territory.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, seeking to calm an explosive issue that has fanned extremist nationalism in Russia, called on the governments of the three Baltic republics Wednesday to give better treatment to their embattled ethnic Russian minorities. "We urge the Latvian government and the other governments to act generously on this issue," Christopher said after meeting with the foreign ministers of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. "We want to pursue this issue very vigorously."
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Estonian bank of the River Narva, a tall white castle built by Danes in the 13th Century still guards this ancient city. Glowering straight back at it from the river's eastern bank is the imposing gray Fortress of Ivangorod, which was built by Czar Ivan III three centuries later and still marks the beginning of Russian territory.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | From Associated Press
Parliament will reconsider a citizenship law that classifies most Russians as foreigners after President Lennart Meri refused Wednesday to sign the controversial bill. "I have taken this step after much deliberation," the president said in a nationwide television address Wednesday evening. "I want to be sure that all the people in Estonia will be treated fairly."
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia said it will take economic and political reprisals against Estonia for adopting a law that Moscow says discriminates against ethnic Russians living there. "Estonia has stepped out . . . on the road of apartheid since a third of its population have been declared aliens," Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev declared, referring to about 600,000 Russians living in the Baltic state. Deputy Foreign Minister Vitaly I.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has come to this: A burly Russian soldier with an automatic rifle slung across his back now patrols the "Bridge of Friendship" that links his country with Estonia, searching cars for groceries being smuggled into this grimy industrial city. The vast majority of people coming into Narva are ethnic Russians, from an elderly man caught with 344 tins of condensed milk hidden under his back seat to a wily teen-ager who smuggles bundles of unlawfully earned rubles here from Russia.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Estonians cast ballots for a new president and Parliament on Sunday in an election overshadowed by the tiny Baltic country's citizenship rules, which bar more than 40% of the population, mainly Russians, from voting. With half the vote counted early today, election authorities reported that Arnold F. Ruutel, a former Communist Party boss and Estonia's current leader, was leading in the presidential contest with about 43% of the vote.
NEWS
September 21, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Estonians cast ballots for a new president and Parliament on Sunday in an election overshadowed by the tiny Baltic country's citizenship rules, which bar more than 40% of the population, mainly Russians, from voting. With half the vote counted early today, election authorities reported that Arnold F. Ruutel, a former Communist Party boss and Estonia's current leader, was leading in the presidential contest with about 43% of the vote.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the world's great powers embraced him as a near-equal at their summit Sunday, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin demanded better economic treatment from abroad and bluntly denied that he plans to withdraw his last troops from the Baltics.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | From Reuters
The Estonian Parliament backed down in a dispute with the Kremlin on Thursday, suspending clauses in a local election law that deprived thousands of Russian immigrants of the vote. Estonian radio said 172 of the 243 deputies accepted a proposal by the republic's president, Arnold Ruutel, to suspend provisions of the law that allowed only people who had lived in the republic for at least two years to vote.
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