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August 16, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by military activity in the Persian Gulf, the Soviet Union has dispatched a high-level envoy in an attempt to ease the situation, a Foreign Ministry spokesman announced Wednesday. Mikhail Sytenko, a former U.N. undersecretary general, left Moscow on Tuesday "to stop the escalation of tensions in the region and stop tensions caused by the Iraqi aggression against Kuwait," Foreign Ministry spokesman Yuri A. Gremitskikh told reporters.
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WORLD
October 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Foreign Ministry complained Wednesday that a private security firm at Baghdad's airport sought to search a vehicle belonging to the Russian Embassy and threatened violence during the incident. The ministry said the armed employees worked for a company it identified as "Global," apparently referring to London-based Global Strategies Group.
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NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union on Wednesday welcomed Iraq's announcement that it will allow all 3,300 Soviet workers in the country to leave and expressed its willingness to discuss an Iraqi demand that compensation be paid for broken labor contracts. "If there are going to be costs, we are prepared to bear those costs because we feel that the security and well-being of our citizens should come first," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
Former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said Moscow MAY HAVE GIVEN SADDAM HUSSEIN FALSE ENCOURAGEMENT in the Gulf crisis. "It is possible that not all the signals that we sent to Saddam Hussein were always justified. . . . Some signals were false and may have given Saddam encouragement," he said without elaboration.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after a delegation from Moscow persuaded the Baghdad government to let Soviet citizens working in Iraq go home, several hundred Soviet technicians are resisting departure, preferring to stay on rather than return to their unsettled homeland, Soviet and Western officials said Saturday. The Soviets, reported to include military advisers as well as oil and electric-power experts, had been barred from leaving in a dispute over canceled contracts between Moscow and Baghdad.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the continued presence of 193 Soviet military advisers in Iraq has drawn harsh criticism from Congress, far more crucial services actually are being provided by about 7,000 Soviet civilians who are still at work on projects vital to Baghdad's economy, U.S. experts said Friday. Both the Soviet Union and the Bush Administration have sought to play down the importance of the advisers, stressing instead the areas in which Moscow has cooperated with the international effort against Iraq.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
Former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said Moscow MAY HAVE GIVEN SADDAM HUSSEIN FALSE ENCOURAGEMENT in the Gulf crisis. "It is possible that not all the signals that we sent to Saddam Hussein were always justified. . . . Some signals were false and may have given Saddam encouragement," he said without elaboration.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to deflect a rising threat, Iraqi authorities announced Tuesday that all 3,300 Soviet workers can leave the country if Moscow meets certain conditions. The decision by the ruling Revolutionary Command Council demanded that Moscow compensate Baghdad for terminating the labor contracts of the Soviet workers. If the Kremlin agrees, the men will be free to leave today, according to a Baghdad report from the Iraqi News Agency.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi and Soviet governments wrangled Monday over the destiny of at least 2,000 Soviet technicians still prevented from leaving Iraq. Iraq has refused to permit them to leave until Moscow pays up on canceled contracts for oil, water and military projects that will be suspended as the workers depart. Although both governments say the issue is economic, there is an undercurrent of Iraqi resentment at having been abandoned by its onetime weapons benefactor.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered all SOVIET citizens evacuated from Iraq. The Foreign Ministry said constant contact is being maintained with Baghdad in around-the-clock efforts to help end the Persian Gulf War. The Kremlin condemned Iraq's latest attacks on Israel but again urged against retaliation. It also said that Gorbachev has not received any replies from his Friday appeals to Arab leaders to avoid turning the war into an Arab-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered all SOVIET citizens evacuated from Iraq. The Foreign Ministry said constant contact is being maintained with Baghdad in around-the-clock efforts to help end the Persian Gulf War. The Kremlin condemned Iraq's latest attacks on Israel but again urged against retaliation. It also said that Gorbachev has not received any replies from his Friday appeals to Arab leaders to avoid turning the war into an Arab-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union is playing an unusual, behind-the-scenes diplomatic role in the Persian Gulf War, trying to use its remaining leverage in Iraq to persuade President Saddam Hussein to quit fighting--and offering to carry the surrender message from Baghdad to Washington if he does. "I hope that (the Iraqis) realize, if they decide it's time to call it quits, that we are there," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said in Moscow on Saturday.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after a delegation from Moscow persuaded the Baghdad government to let Soviet citizens working in Iraq go home, several hundred Soviet technicians are resisting departure, preferring to stay on rather than return to their unsettled homeland, Soviet and Western officials said Saturday. The Soviets, reported to include military advisers as well as oil and electric-power experts, had been barred from leaving in a dispute over canceled contracts between Moscow and Baghdad.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi and Soviet governments wrangled Monday over the destiny of at least 2,000 Soviet technicians still prevented from leaving Iraq. Iraq has refused to permit them to leave until Moscow pays up on canceled contracts for oil, water and military projects that will be suspended as the workers depart. Although both governments say the issue is economic, there is an undercurrent of Iraqi resentment at having been abandoned by its onetime weapons benefactor.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union on Wednesday welcomed Iraq's announcement that it will allow all 3,300 Soviet workers in the country to leave and expressed its willingness to discuss an Iraqi demand that compensation be paid for broken labor contracts. "If there are going to be costs, we are prepared to bear those costs because we feel that the security and well-being of our citizens should come first," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to deflect a rising threat, Iraqi authorities announced Tuesday that all 3,300 Soviet workers can leave the country if Moscow meets certain conditions. The decision by the ruling Revolutionary Command Council demanded that Moscow compensate Baghdad for terminating the labor contracts of the Soviet workers. If the Kremlin agrees, the men will be free to leave today, according to a Baghdad report from the Iraqi News Agency.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Soviet Union is playing an unusual, behind-the-scenes diplomatic role in the Persian Gulf War, trying to use its remaining leverage in Iraq to persuade President Saddam Hussein to quit fighting--and offering to carry the surrender message from Baghdad to Washington if he does. "I hope that (the Iraqis) realize, if they decide it's time to call it quits, that we are there," Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman Vitaly I. Churkin said in Moscow on Saturday.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, which over the last two months has steadily escalated its criticism of Iraq, complained Tuesday that Baghdad has started delaying exit visas for hundreds of Soviet specialists whose contracts have expired and now wish to go home. Yuri Gremitskikh, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, said that for more than a week, the Iraqi government has withheld permission for 870 oil workers to leave southern Iraq and for 372 construction workers to leave a thermal power station near Baghdad.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, which over the last two months has steadily escalated its criticism of Iraq, complained Tuesday that Baghdad has started delaying exit visas for hundreds of Soviet specialists whose contracts have expired and now wish to go home. Yuri Gremitskikh, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, said that for more than a week, the Iraqi government has withheld permission for 870 oil workers to leave southern Iraq and for 372 construction workers to leave a thermal power station near Baghdad.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the continued presence of 193 Soviet military advisers in Iraq has drawn harsh criticism from Congress, far more crucial services actually are being provided by about 7,000 Soviet civilians who are still at work on projects vital to Baghdad's economy, U.S. experts said Friday. Both the Soviet Union and the Bush Administration have sought to play down the importance of the advisers, stressing instead the areas in which Moscow has cooperated with the international effort against Iraq.
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