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NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The happiness of Alexander Lerner overflows from his small office in the basement of the Weizmann Institute of Science here and virtually envelops all who pass. The warm and ebullient Lerner quickly ticks off the reasons for his joy. A coronary pump, the result of 20 years' research on an artificial heart, is ready for trial use. He lives in a comfortable flat with his son and daughter-in-law; his daughter is just down the street. He cannot think of any unmet material needs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
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NEWS
May 6, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian immigrant voters, viewed by many as the decisive factor in the last two Israeli elections, are shifting support away from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and toward his main rival in the May 17 vote, according to a variety of new polls. Analysts say the trend could spell the difference in what is increasingly a tight, two-man race between Netanyahu, the conservative Likud Party leader, and Ehud Barak, who heads the left-of-center Labor Party.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the eight years he has spent in Israel, Russian-born Adolph Loshak has always voted for the right-of-center Likud Party, feeling comfortable with its tough positions on issues of peace and security. Until Monday. Standing in the dappled sunlight in this city's central park, Loshak said he agonized but finally decided to cast his ballot in Monday's Israeli elections for Ehud Barak, the leader of the center-left Labor Party, rather than Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Likud leader.
NEWS
June 3, 1988
The Soviet Union has quietly inaugurated a policy of allowing Jews to leave the country for visits to relatives in Israel, Israeli officials said. About 1,400 Soviet Jews arrived in Israel for visits of one to three months between January and April, and about 400 Soviet nationals are currently in Israel on such visits, officials said. "It's another sign of openness (toward Israel).
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the eight years he has spent in Israel, Russian-born Adolph Loshak has always voted for the right-of-center Likud Party, feeling comfortable with its tough positions on issues of peace and security. Until Monday. Standing in the dappled sunlight in this city's central park, Loshak said he agonized but finally decided to cast his ballot in Monday's Israeli elections for Ehud Barak, the leader of the center-left Labor Party, rather than Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Likud leader.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The gathering in a rented concert hall here earlier this month resembled a reunion--Gulag U., Class of 1970, or maybe 1975.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Soviet authorities allowed 1,470 Jews to leave in June, the sixth straight rise in the monthly emigration total, but only 127 of the migrants went to Israel, a resettlement agency said Friday. It was the highest number of Jews allowed out of the Soviet Union since June, 1980, when 1,767 left the country, according to figures published by the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration. In May, 1,145 Jews left the Soviet Union.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian-born Israelis, who represent the largest immigrant group in this nation of immigrants, are hoping to make significant inroads into local government when voters go to the polls today. Amid a flare-up of anti-immigrant sentiment, immigrant parties are testing newfound political strength and running dozens of candidates for city council and mayoral offices throughout Israel.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The first official Soviet government delegation to visit Israel in a generation Monday huddled with Finnish diplomats in Tel Aviv and visited the seat of the Russian Orthodox Church in Jerusalem after arriving secretly the night before to avoid anti-Soviet demonstrations.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian immigrant voters, viewed by many as the decisive factor in the last two Israeli elections, are shifting support away from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and toward his main rival in the May 17 vote, according to a variety of new polls. Analysts say the trend could spell the difference in what is increasingly a tight, two-man race between Netanyahu, the conservative Likud Party leader, and Ehud Barak, who heads the left-of-center Labor Party.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian-born Israelis, who represent the largest immigrant group in this nation of immigrants, are hoping to make significant inroads into local government when voters go to the polls today. Amid a flare-up of anti-immigrant sentiment, immigrant parties are testing newfound political strength and running dozens of candidates for city council and mayoral offices throughout Israel.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Natan Sharansky, the Soviet prisoner turned Israeli minister of trade, it seems that life in the gulag was simpler than life in the government. At the beginning of his nine-year imprisonment, he took the uncompromising stand that he could not cooperate with his KGB keepers. Instead, he played a kind of mental chess game with them, trying to elicit information without giving up anything of his own.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The happiness of Alexander Lerner overflows from his small office in the basement of the Weizmann Institute of Science here and virtually envelops all who pass. The warm and ebullient Lerner quickly ticks off the reasons for his joy. A coronary pump, the result of 20 years' research on an artificial heart, is ready for trial use. He lives in a comfortable flat with his son and daughter-in-law; his daughter is just down the street. He cannot think of any unmet material needs.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa Friedman arrived in Ofaqim, a depressed textile town amid the wheat fields of Israel's Negev region, with a suitcase and hopes for a new life far from her Soviet home. Newcomers to Ofaqim are rare. More than a few people have moved on for lack of work. But even so, Friedman's arrival took the town by surprise.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a spare, fourth-floor walk-up apartment near Jerusalem's central bus station, the Shkolniksons of Leningrad, two months in Israel and jobless, counted themselves among the fortunate. They had left home and families to catch a swelling tide of Jewish emigrants leaving the Soviet Union, most of them uncertain how long the door would remain open. "Now, under (Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa Friedman arrived in Ofaqim, a depressed textile town amid the wheat fields of Israel's Negev region, with a suitcase and hopes for a new life far from her Soviet home. Newcomers to Ofaqim are rare. More than a few people have moved on for lack of work. But even so, Friedman's arrival took the town by surprise.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a spare, fourth-floor walk-up apartment near Jerusalem's central bus station, the Shkolniksons of Leningrad, two months in Israel and jobless, counted themselves among the fortunate. They had left home and families to catch a swelling tide of Jewish emigrants leaving the Soviet Union, most of them uncertain how long the door would remain open. "Now, under (Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Soviet authorities allowed 1,470 Jews to leave in June, the sixth straight rise in the monthly emigration total, but only 127 of the migrants went to Israel, a resettlement agency said Friday. It was the highest number of Jews allowed out of the Soviet Union since June, 1980, when 1,767 left the country, according to figures published by the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration. In May, 1,145 Jews left the Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 3, 1988
The Soviet Union has quietly inaugurated a policy of allowing Jews to leave the country for visits to relatives in Israel, Israeli officials said. About 1,400 Soviet Jews arrived in Israel for visits of one to three months between January and April, and about 400 Soviet nationals are currently in Israel on such visits, officials said. "It's another sign of openness (toward Israel).
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