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NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa Friedman arrived in Ofaqim, a depressed textile town amid the wheat fields of Israel's Negev region, with a suitcase and hopes for a new life far from her Soviet home. Newcomers to Ofaqim are rare. More than a few people have moved on for lack of work. But even so, Friedman's arrival took the town by surprise.
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NEWS
October 10, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a spare, fourth-floor walk-up apartment near Jerusalem's central bus station, the Shkolniksons of Leningrad, two months in Israel and jobless, counted themselves among the fortunate. They had left home and families to catch a swelling tide of Jewish emigrants leaving the Soviet Union, most of them uncertain how long the door would remain open. "Now, under (Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Soviet authorities allowed 1,470 Jews to leave in June, the sixth straight rise in the monthly emigration total, but only 127 of the migrants went to Israel, a resettlement agency said Friday. It was the highest number of Jews allowed out of the Soviet Union since June, 1980, when 1,767 left the country, according to figures published by the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration. In May, 1,145 Jews left the Soviet Union.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The gathering in a rented concert hall here earlier this month resembled a reunion--Gulag U., Class of 1970, or maybe 1975.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The first official Soviet government delegation to visit Israel in a generation Monday huddled with Finnish diplomats in Tel Aviv and visited the seat of the Russian Orthodox Church in Jerusalem after arriving secretly the night before to avoid anti-Soviet demonstrations.
NEWS
April 8, 1985 | From Reuters
Tired of American crime shows with Hebrew subtitles, dozens of Soviet immigrants in Israel are tuning in to television from back home. About 20 Soviet Jewish families in the southern desert town of Beersheba have purchased small rooftop satellite dishes that pick up Soviet TV, the Maariv newspaper reported today. "What does Israel television give you except news and American movies showing only murder and suspense?" said Boris Resnik, an engineer who emigrated six years ago from Moscow.
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