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NEWS
October 3, 1995 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An extremist convicted of inciting racial hatred in his native Germany shook up the political Establishment in Latvia's parliamentary elections by leading his right-wing party to a finish near the top, returns showed Monday. Joachim Siegerist, who only in recent years claimed Latvian citizenship and doesn't speak his adopted country's language, ran a populist campaign that played on Latvians' fears of the sizable ethnic Russian minority.
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NEWS
April 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second bomb attack in four days by extremists in the Latvian capital, Riga, damaged property at the Russian Embassy on Monday and prompted Moscow to warn that "fascists are raising their heads" in the former Soviet republic. As with Thursday's predawn explosion at Riga's synagogue, no injuries were reported in the embassy blast, caused by plastic explosives detonated in a concrete trash bin outside the facility.
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NEWS
June 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unemployed schoolteacher drummed her heels nervously against the wooden benches of Riga City Hall last week as she waited to take an exam instead of give one. Without a certificate of Latvian language proficiency, Svetlana N. Malashenkova, an ethnic Russian born 35 years ago in what was then the Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic, would not qualify for most jobs. Even with it, she will not have the right to vote in the elections that will decide her future.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An extremist convicted of inciting racial hatred in his native Germany shook up the political Establishment in Latvia's parliamentary elections by leading his right-wing party to a finish near the top, returns showed Monday. Joachim Siegerist, who only in recent years claimed Latvian citizenship and doesn't speak his adopted country's language, ran a populist campaign that played on Latvians' fears of the sizable ethnic Russian minority.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second bomb attack in four days by extremists in the Latvian capital, Riga, damaged property at the Russian Embassy on Monday and prompted Moscow to warn that "fascists are raising their heads" in the former Soviet republic. As with Thursday's predawn explosion at Riga's synagogue, no injuries were reported in the embassy blast, caused by plastic explosives detonated in a concrete trash bin outside the facility.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992
Your article on Russians living in Latvia ("Latvia Playing Russian Roulette," March 24) contains several key factual errors which mar an otherwise informative piece on citizenship issues in Latvia. The Latvian parliament's draft law on citizenship would not "render nearly half its 2.7 million inhabitants illegal aliens." If the present draft law were passed, the vast majority of Latvia's present population would be eligible for citizenship, while the remainder would have the right to remain in Latvia as legal aliens.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valery Kalabugin's mother was Russian, his father Armenian, his birthplace this center of a 5,000-year-old Baltic culture. Kalabugin sits in the Estonian congress, one house of the country's provisional legislature, and his recent record of fighting for the independence of Estonia is unassailable. But even he has sympathy for the people trying to keep him from becoming a citizen of his native country.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Estonians and Latvians cast ballots in their Soviet republics' first multi-party parliamentary elections Sunday, with nationalists predicting both victory and a slower approach to independence than that seized by the neighboring Baltic breakaway state of Lithuania a week ago. Unofficial returns from Latvia, gathered by the grass-roots People's Front, showed pro-secession candidates apparently on their way to an impressive victory.
WORLD
May 1, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Viktor Dergunov has lived in this graceful old city of church spires and cobblestone streets since 1961, when the Soviet army dispatched his father to this tiny Baltic republic that once formed the forbidding edge of the Iron Curtain. Over the decades, the Russian family came to see Latvia as their home. Dergunov met and married Yelena, who was born in Riga. So were their children and, last year, a granddaughter.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unemployed schoolteacher drummed her heels nervously against the wooden benches of Riga City Hall last week as she waited to take an exam instead of give one. Without a certificate of Latvian language proficiency, Svetlana N. Malashenkova, an ethnic Russian born 35 years ago in what was then the Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic, would not qualify for most jobs. Even with it, she will not have the right to vote in the elections that will decide her future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992
Your article on Russians living in Latvia ("Latvia Playing Russian Roulette," March 24) contains several key factual errors which mar an otherwise informative piece on citizenship issues in Latvia. The Latvian parliament's draft law on citizenship would not "render nearly half its 2.7 million inhabitants illegal aliens." If the present draft law were passed, the vast majority of Latvia's present population would be eligible for citizenship, while the remainder would have the right to remain in Latvia as legal aliens.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
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