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March 29, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a central square in the Lithuanian capital the other day, a Russian and a Lithuanian were arguing with some urgency about their future. "I am a Russian, but I was born here. Lithuania is my country too, and I don't want to be your slave," the Russian man said. "You are a fool," the Lithuanian replied. "I don't want to do anything like that. Live quietly; who is bothering you? You have rights here. Why do you need the Kremlin or Moscow?"
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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the right-wing junta took power in Moscow, many of the Russian workers at the Poogelmann Factory here greeted each other with the phrase, S prazdnikom-- Happy holiday! But just two weeks later, their Russian director has been sacked and is facing criminal charges for supporting the coup. The factory, which was Soviet-owned, has been taken over by an almost-free Estonia.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a central square in the Lithuanian capital the other day, a Russian and a Lithuanian were arguing with some urgency about their future. "I am a Russian, but I was born here. Lithuania is my country too, and I don't want to be your slave," the Russian man said. "You are a fool," the Lithuanian replied. "I don't want to do anything like that. Live quietly; who is bothering you? You have rights here. Why do you need the Kremlin or Moscow?"
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heat and hot water have been off for more than a month in the tiny, two-room apartment where Ruth and Jaak Huimerind live with their three children. But the hardships don't end there. Ruth, 36, comes home exhausted and upset after standing in line each day for a loaf of bread, or waiting an hour in the cold just to get inside a market--only to find that the shelves are either stripped bare or stocked with food she cannot really afford.
NEWS
November 6, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hanni Vogelweid of Huntington Beach doesn't remember seeing Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese diplomat who provided her family with transit visas so they could leave Lithuania in early 1941. But she'll never forget what Sugihara did. She's alive because of him. Vogelweid, a 73-year-old German-born Jew, is one of as many as 10,000 who received transit visas from a man who risked his own life to help Jews avoid the Holocaust.
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