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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local Russian American leaders lambasted the media and law enforcement officials Thursday, accusing them of perpetuating the myth that immigrants from the former Soviet Union are involved in a "Russian Mafia," and arguing that there is no evidence of such a group. Heads of emigre groups criticized media outlets for stereotyping Russians as members of organized crime in the coverage of last week's arrest of Ukrainian-born Mikail Markhasev in the slaying of Ennis Cosby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Silver-haired Dmitri Hvorostovsky, a celebrated operatic baritone from Siberia, returns to Los Angeles Opera on Thursday for a recital of classical music from his native Russia and Western Europe. This is your third recital in L.A., and half the program is devoted to Russian songs. Last year you sang Russian war songs. Are you trying to raise the profile of Russian music in the West? As a Russian musician ? Russian born and raised ? that's what I do the best on the concert stage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | ANDREA FORD
A Russian immigrant was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole Tuesday in the executions of two of his countrymen, whose fingers and thumbs were chopped off in a failed attempt to prevent identification of their bodies. Serguei Ivanov, 31, listened intently to an interpreter as Superior Court Judge Nancy Brown told him he will spend the "rest of his natural life in prison, unless there is a change in the law and I don't envision that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing rows of aging medals on weary chests, hundreds of old soldiers from the Soviet army marched once more Tuesday--this time to a park in West Hollywood where they celebrated the end of World War II. It was a bittersweet reunion for veterans of the Red army who suffered mightily to beat back Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union, only to see it replaced with Cold War oppression that drove them from their homeland.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrey Kuznetsov made his way in just two years from a dank cell in a Soviet prison camp to the glamour of the Beverly Hills art scene. Dashingly handsome, he seemed to always have a beautiful woman on his arm, a champagne glass in his hand and a scheme to make a million dollars overnight. Ten weeks ago, one of those illegal schemes got Kuznetsov, 28, killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1993 | AARON CURTISS
After New Year's, Thanksgiving is Ark Kivman's favorite holiday: a quintessentially American celebration of culinary indulgences and caloric excesses that has no parallel in his Russian homeland. But as much as the owner of the Moscow Nights nightclub in Studio City savors the traditional turkey and stuffing and cranberry sauce, everything goes better with borsht. "It's an American holiday," Kivman said. "We celebrate it the same way Americans do--big turkey with a lot of vodka."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992
A judge on Tuesday ordered two Russian immigrants to stand trial for the shooting deaths of two of their countrymen, whose fingers and thumbs were hacked off after the murders. Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Elva Soper decided there is enough evidence to try Sergei Ivanov, 28, and Alexander Nikolaev, 31, for the murders of Andrey Kuznetosov and Vladimir Litvinenko, both 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1992 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They remembered surviving on black bread and water, and embracing American troops in victory at the Elbe River in Germany. They also remembered fighting side by side with troops who sometimes ridiculed Jews. And at their "Veterans Day" gathering in West Hollywood on Sunday, these Jewish World War II survivors drank vodka, attacked the chicken Kiev and clasped old comrades with Russian bear hugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
West Hollywood city officials, in an attempt to bridge a cultural gap between the Russian immigrant community and police, will conduct a seminar in Russian about American-style law enforcement. On Thursday, representatives of the Sheriff's Department's West Hollywood station will explain the tenets of policing as part of an ongoing lecture series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a year away from their homes--eight months of it stranded in Los Angeles Harbor with engine problems--the crew of the Russian seagoing tugboat Gigant are going to get their Christmas wish. They're going to be deported. Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said Thursday that the six Russian sailors still aboard the ship must leave the United States because it appears the owners of the stranded ship are not making any progress toward repairing it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the stretch of Santa Monica Boulevard where the store signs turn to Cyrillic script and the market cases bulge with sausage, Russia's economic and political crisis evokes dismay, fatalism, even indifference. But one thing emigrants from the former Soviet Union don't express when they scan the headlines is surprise. No, they shrug, this is all too predictable, a mess that will not go away, even if President Boris N. Yeltsin does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1998 | ERIC RIMBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Soloveichik is the kind of kid who makes adults believe they are looking at the next Einstein. Despite coming to the United States from Eastern Europe only seven years ago, the 18-year-old senior at Milken Community High School of Stephen Wise Temple, received 1,600--the highest score possible--on his college entrance exams. College, no doubt, will mean Harvard, MIT, Stanford, or one of the other elite schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1997
Hundreds of Russian World War II veterans today will commemorate the estimated 20 million Russians who died in the conflict. More than 100,000 former residents of the Soviet Union live in the Southland, with many residing in West Hollywood, said Efin Kutz, a founder of the 20-year-old L.A. Russian Veterans Assn., which is sponsoring a 1 p.m. event at Fiesta Hall at Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica Blvd. "This is how we get together and remember what happened," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local Russian American leaders lambasted the media and law enforcement officials Thursday, accusing them of perpetuating the myth that immigrants from the former Soviet Union are involved in a "Russian Mafia," and arguing that there is no evidence of such a group. Heads of emigre groups criticized media outlets for stereotyping Russians as members of organized crime in the coverage of last week's arrest of Ukrainian-born Mikail Markhasev in the slaying of Ennis Cosby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
West Hollywood city officials, in an attempt to bridge a cultural gap between the Russian immigrant community and police, will conduct a seminar in Russian about American-style law enforcement. On Thursday, representatives of the Sheriff's Department's West Hollywood station will explain the tenets of policing as part of an ongoing lecture series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1996
Los Angeles police are seeking possible victims of a young Russian-born man accused in a series of sexual assaults on women he met through the Russian community in West Hollywood. Investigators with the sex crimes unit suspect that Vladimir Soroka, 18, may have attacked several women and that some victims may be reluctant to call police. "Some victims of date rape do not feel confident about coming forward because they don't feel they would be believed," Los Angeles Police Det.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a stuffy U.S. classroom, two dozen shirt-sleeved Soviet managers puzzle over a peculiar capitalist custom: putting products on sale. "Do they have to sell it at the price advertised?" wonders one of the middle-aged students. Demands another: "How long do they have to keep it at the sale price?" Welcome to Capitalism 101--or something like it--at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, where a group of Soviets is getting a close-up view of free enterprise this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the stretch of Santa Monica Boulevard where the store signs turn to Cyrillic script and the market cases bulge with sausage, Russia's economic and political crisis evokes dismay, fatalism, even indifference. But one thing emigrants from the former Soviet Union don't express when they scan the headlines is surprise. No, they shrug, this is all too predictable, a mess that will not go away, even if President Boris N. Yeltsin does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996
A joint investigation between the FBI and Russian law enforcement has culminated in the seizure of two undeveloped parcels of land in the Hollywood Hills owned by a member of a Russian organized crime figure, the FBI announced Monday. Five months ago the FBI seized the $11.5-million mansion of the banker, Yuri Fadayev. Russian authorities have arrested several people in connection with the fraud, the FBI said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Svetlana Alpatov felt silly packing bathing suits and shorts when she and her husband prepared last week for the California vacation of their life. It was the middle of winter, after all, a hard Siberian winter where temperatures hover around 20 below. But Sergey Alpatov, an eye surgeon, insisted that he was going to swim in the Pacific Ocean when he came to Los Angeles as part of a cultural exchange program. And swim he did.
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