Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussians Northern California
IN THE NEWS

Russians Northern California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It all began three years ago in a makeshift church in the back yard of Vladimir and Nadezhda Kuzmenko, who had just moved to this Central Valley city with their eight young children. The congregation of 35 quickly outgrew the Kuzmenkos' covered patio, then relocated to a rented building that held 180. Soon, the faithful--all Pentecostal Christians from the Soviet Union--were praying for an even larger space. "People were spilling over to the stairs and sidewalk," said the Rev.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The portrait of a deliberate, calculating killer emerged Wednesday as authorities continued the search for a 27-year-old man suspected in the murders of half a dozen family members, including his wife and son. Investigators believe that suspect Nikolay Soltys switched cars after a murderous rampage Monday, had his second vehicle repaired and left behind a grisly manifest of victims offering the first hints of a motive: He was angered by how some of his relatives spoke to him.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The portrait of a deliberate, calculating killer emerged Wednesday as authorities continued the search for a 27-year-old man suspected in the murders of half a dozen family members, including his wife and son. Investigators believe that suspect Nikolay Soltys switched cars after a murderous rampage Monday, had his second vehicle repaired and left behind a grisly manifest of victims offering the first hints of a motive: He was angered by how some of his relatives spoke to him.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man with a reported history of violence and mental instability went on a rampage in the capital's suburbs Monday, killing his wife and four other relatives before fleeing with his 3-year-old son, police said. Law enforcement officials had launched a nationwide search for Nikolay Soltys, 27, a Ukrainian immigrant described as armed and dangerous. Late Monday night, a mile from Soltys' home, authorities found the silver Nissan Altima that he had driven off in 12 hours earlier.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man with a reported history of violence and mental instability went on a rampage in the capital's suburbs Monday, killing his wife and four other relatives before fleeing with his 3-year-old son, police said. Law enforcement officials had launched a nationwide search for Nikolay Soltys, 27, a Ukrainian immigrant described as armed and dangerous. Late Monday night, a mile from Soltys' home, authorities found the silver Nissan Altima that he had driven off in 12 hours earlier.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the height of the Cold War, Michael Lokteff, a devoutly religious man, set up a small short-wave broadcast studio half a world away from his Russian homeland. For the next 40 years, he would beam the word of God, in Russian, back to the atheistic Soviet state. For millions there, the scratchy broadcasts were the only link to religious beliefs forbidden by their government. Years later, many would say the Word of Russia broadcasts, as they were called in the U.S.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the height of the Cold War, Michael Lokteff, a devoutly religious man, set up a small short-wave broadcast studio half a world away from his Russian homeland. For the next 40 years, he would beam the word of God, in Russian, back to the atheistic Soviet state. For millions there, the scratchy broadcasts were the only link to religious beliefs forbidden by their government. Years later, many would say the Word of Russia broadcasts, as they were called in the U.S.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It all began three years ago in a makeshift church in the back yard of Vladimir and Nadezhda Kuzmenko, who had just moved to this Central Valley city with their eight young children. The congregation of 35 quickly outgrew the Kuzmenkos' covered patio, then relocated to a rented building that held 180. Soon, the faithful--all Pentecostal Christians from the Soviet Union--were praying for an even larger space. "People were spilling over to the stairs and sidewalk," said the Rev.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|