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NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Yakovlevna Gaysinskaya was a child of the revolution, born with the Communist regime in 1917 and raised on its ideals. Now she has lived to see its end. And it hurts. After 52 years in the Communist Party and 55 years of laboring overtime for the sake of the bright future her leaders had promised, Gaysinskaya has seen the system that she worked for fall apart and the ideas she believed in lose credence. "I lived in hope," she says. "I always had hope, that's how we were.
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WORLD
September 25, 2011 | By Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced Saturday what many had long suspected: that he will run for president in the spring in the expectation of extending his grip on Russian politics for an additional six years — and perhaps longer. The announcement at a congress of the ruling United Russia party ended months of speculation about maneuvering inside the Kremlin by Putin and his protege, Dmitry Medvedev, who became president in 2008 when Putin left the office because of term limits.
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NEWS
September 16, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail S. Gorbachev's popularity in Russia has rebounded sharply from low levels after the failure of the hard-liners' coup against him, but Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin and the Russian Parliament were seen by the people as better able to solve the nation's problems, according to an extensive Times Mirror survey released today.
WORLD
September 16, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
One of Russia's wealthiest men on Thursday abruptly quit as leader of a party casting itself as a challenger to the Kremlin's stranglehold on politics, suggesting to supporters that a feared power broker had orchestrated a takeover because the party was becoming too independent. The decision several months ago by Mikhail Prokhorov, a businessman who owns the New Jersey Nets basketball team, to try to revive the moribund Right Cause party had been controversial from the start. Prokhorov has decried the lack of alternatives to the governing party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996
Your June 11 front-page photo of Boris Yeltsin on stage shows how Russian politics are paralleling ours. All he needs is Bill Clinton backing him on sax. SKIP NEWMAN Los Angeles
OPINION
December 18, 1994 | Gregory Freidin, Gregory Freidin, chairman of the Slavic department at Stanford University, is co-author of "Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August, 1991, Coup" (M. E. Sharpe Publishers)
A subtle but significant change of government has occurred here. The dispatch of Russian soldiers and security forces into Chechnya, the breakaway republic, and the protest it has caused among supporters of reform and "democrats," has realigned the political forces in Russia, more so than did the disbanding of the Parliament in October, 1993. Authoritarian rule may be gaining momentum. However distasteful many democrats might have found President Boris N.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said in an interview broadcast Sunday that he has received tempting offers of lecture posts at universities in the United States, Japan and elsewhere but that he intends to retain a role in his country's political life. However, Gorbachev, who is expected to resign his now-titular presidency within days, did not rule out the possibility of combining foreign offers with the future work he expects to do at home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
A member of the Russian national legislature on Friday told students at Golden West College that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev erred in believing that he could reform the Communist Party. Alexandre P. Vladislavlev, a prominent Russian politician and economic expert, said he supports Gorbachev but believes that the Soviet leader was mistaken in thinking the Communist Party could be changed.
NEWS
September 22, 1993
Key events in Russian politics since the failed Soviet coup in August 1991: 1991 August--Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin emerges as nation's most powerful politician after Soviet coup fails. Yeltsin suspends the Communist Party of Soviet Union and seizes its property. October--Yeltsin outlines radical reform program, including freeing prices and privatizing small businesses. November--Yeltsin names himself head of government, takes over duties of prime minister.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1994 | STEPHEN F. COHEN, Stephen F. Cohen is a professor of politics and the director of Russian Studies at Princeton University.
The worst and most predictable American foreign-policy failure of the late 20th Century has been unfolding in post-communist Russia ever since the Soviet breakup in 1991. All the outcomes we want in a country that remains so essential to our security--democracy, a prospering economy, a political Establishment friendly to the West, major reductions and safeguarding of nuclear weapons and other devices of mass destruction--have been undermined by U.S. government policy.
WORLD
December 2, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
On the television screen, three dark-skinned men from the Caucasus sit sullenly munching watermelon in a Moscow courtyard, then brazenly toss the chewed rinds into the path of a young blond woman pushing a baby carriage. Two ethnic Russians glare at the watermelon thugs. "Clean it up," one of them says menacingly. The words "Let's clean our city of trash" flash across the screen.
WORLD
November 27, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party has always billed itself as the worker's party. Alexei Kondaurov, who is running for parliament on the Communist ticket, is no exception. He works five days a week as an executive of Yukos Oil Co., earning $629,556 a year. Sergei Muravlenko also aspires to represent the Communists in parliament. Board chairman of Yukos until June, Muravlenko earns $10 million a year and owns a Porsche, a BMW and two Mercedeses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1998 | NINA L. KHRUSHCHEVA, Nina L. Khrushcheva is deputy editor of the East European Constitutional Review at the NYU School of Law and a senior fellow at the World Policy Institute of the New School for Social Research
First it was the Jews. Then the Romanovs, the nobility and the kulaks. After 1991, it was Lenin and the communists. Now, it seems, it's the Jews again. Like history in the Karl Marx aphorism, Russian hatreds repeat themselves. Luckily, the rest of that saying also applies, for Moscow's most recent bout of anti-Semitism is a case of history repeating itself not as tragedy, but as farce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996
Your June 11 front-page photo of Boris Yeltsin on stage shows how Russian politics are paralleling ours. All he needs is Bill Clinton backing him on sax. SKIP NEWMAN Los Angeles
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One campaigner was hospitalized after an unknown assailant threw acid in his face. Mayor Anatoly A. Sobchak claims that his opponents are bankrolled by organized crime. Yuri Boldyrev and other challengers accuse the incumbent of media manipulation, intimidating opponents and selling out St. Petersburg to rescue struggling Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fallout from parliamentary elections held nearly two weeks ago wafted into Russia's political circles Thursday, with a flurry of winners announcing presidential bids and incumbent Boris N. Yeltsin warning that heads will roll for his personal setbacks. Alexander I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | BORIS M. PARAMONOV and DMITRI N. SHALIN, Boris M. Paramonov is senior correspondent for Radio Liberty. Dmitri N. Shalin is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. and
Alexander Solzhenitsyn is about to end his 20-year exile and return to his native Russia. "I hope I can be at least of some help to my tormented nation," he recently told a town meeting in Cavendish, Vt. Many in his homeland harbor similar hopes. The desperate conditions Russia faces today make his entry into politics not only feasible but also desirable. The political process in today's Russia is hopelessly deadlocked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1993 | YURI KARASH, Yuri Karash has a Ph.D. from the Russian Academy of Science. He is working on his second doctorate at American University. and
Russia's parliamentary elections Sunday will determine the political life of the country for the next two years. What shape that takes will depend on the distribution of power among the three principal electoral blocs: Russia's Choice, led by Yegor T. Gaidar; Party of the Russian Unity and Accord, led by Sergei M. Shakhrai, and a third bloc, led by Grigory A. Yavlinsky, Yuri Y. Boldyrev and Vladimir P. Lukin. What is the goal of each of these blocs?
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's Supreme Court ended a weeklong political drama Saturday by ordering that the reformist movement headed by liberal economist Grigory A. Yavlinsky be allowed to compete in Dec. 17 parliamentary elections. The refusal last week by the Central Elections Commission to register the popular Yabloko bloc had been condemned by democracy proponents throughout Russia as a blatant attempt by those loyal to President Boris N. Yeltsin to manipulate the elections.
OPINION
December 18, 1994 | Gregory Freidin, Gregory Freidin, chairman of the Slavic department at Stanford University, is co-author of "Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August, 1991, Coup" (M. E. Sharpe Publishers)
A subtle but significant change of government has occurred here. The dispatch of Russian soldiers and security forces into Chechnya, the breakaway republic, and the protest it has caused among supporters of reform and "democrats," has realigned the political forces in Russia, more so than did the disbanding of the Parliament in October, 1993. Authoritarian rule may be gaining momentum. However distasteful many democrats might have found President Boris N.
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