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NEWS
April 3, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officers of a former Soviet army unit stationed in an embattled Slavic region of Moldova warned both sides in the conflict there Thursday that they will order their soldiers to assume "full combat alert" unless the two belligerents pull back their forces and stop the bloodshed. The warning came a day after Moldovan police attacked Slavic Dniester guards in Bendery, a town in the self-styled Dniester Moldavian Republic, a region seeking to break away from the former Soviet republic of Moldova.
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WORLD
February 9, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence officials are frustrated that the Russian government is withholding information about threats to Olympic venues coming from inside Russia, several lawmakers said during talk shows Sunday. "We aren't getting the kind of cooperation that we'd like from the Russians in terms of their internal threats," Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said in an appearance on "Fox News Sunday. " "It means that we're less effective in protecting our people, and that's a frustration," Schiff said.
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NEWS
April 2, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moldovan forces attacked a police station Wednesday in a predominantly Russian town in the former Soviet republic of Moldova, killing six people. Russia's foreign minister, meanwhile, increased the pressure on Moldova by threatening to use "forceful methods" to protect Russia's brethren. "It goes without saying that we will guard the rights of Russians beyond Russia's borders," Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev told the prestigious newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Stung by another terrorist attack in Russia's capital, President Dmitry Medvedev on Tuesday ordered security services to step up efforts to dismantle extremist networks and sharply criticized the management of Moscow's biggest airport. A day after a suicide bombing killed 35 people waiting for international passengers arriving at Domodedovo Airport, there still was no claim of responsibility. But suspicion fell on Islamic militant groups from the Caucasus region who have been blamed for previous attacks, and Russian officials said they were searching for three Chechen men. In televised comments to the leadership of the Federal Security Service, a successor agency to the KGB, Medvedev singled out officials at the airport, which has been remodeled and expanded in the last decade.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | Associated Press
The head of Russia's Security Council has submitted his resignation, a news agency reported Tuesday. Interfax said that Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov asked President Boris N. Yeltsin to accept his resignation but did not report why he wanted to quit. Other officials declined to confirm or deny the report. Shaposhnikov left his position as military commander of the Commonwealth of Independent States in June to take over as Security Council head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1996
Jonathan Clarke (Commentary, Nov. 25) of the Cato Institute makes an excellent case not to do anything that might reignite tensions between Russia and NATO. Looking back, it is easy to see that if some different directions (and attitudes) were taken at critical junctures in history, governments could have followed a more civilized policy for geopolitics in its broadest sense. Here are a few suggestions: Eliminate the armed forces from all of the small Eastern European countries that wish to join this group.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russia unveiled its new national security doctrine Friday, broadening the Kremlin's authority to use nuclear weapons and accusing the United States of trying to weaken Russia and become the world's dominant power. The doctrine replaces one adopted in 1997, a time when political and military partnership with the West were still buzzwords and many Russians were optimistic about the country's economic future.
WORLD
February 9, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence officials are frustrated that the Russian government is withholding information about threats to Olympic venues coming from inside Russia, several lawmakers said during talk shows Sunday. "We aren't getting the kind of cooperation that we'd like from the Russians in terms of their internal threats," Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said in an appearance on "Fox News Sunday. " "It means that we're less effective in protecting our people, and that's a frustration," Schiff said.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most disruptive incident to date in an epidemic of threatened terrorist acts, police evacuated one of Moscow's three international airports Monday after a caller claimed that a bomb was about to explode at the crowded transport hub.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | Kevin Ryan, Retired Brig. Gen. Kevin Ryan is a senior fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and a former chief of staff of the Army's Space and Missile Defense Command.
Twenty years ago this December, President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev signed the only treaty in history that eliminated an entire class of weapons -- shorter- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles. The treaty commonly referred to as the INF -- Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces -- Treaty, resulted in the two countries destroying a combined 2,692 ground-based ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges of about 300 miles to 3,400 miles.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite nagging reminders of Kremlin human rights abuses and this city's Nazi past, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder on Friday proclaimed new promise in their relations and a mutual commitment to making Russia part of a secure and prosperous Europe. A two-day summit between Putin and Schroeder produced the kind of "concrete results" both leaders said they prefer to the bearhugging, sauna-sharing camaraderie of their respective predecessors, Boris N.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Russia unveiled its new national security doctrine Friday, broadening the Kremlin's authority to use nuclear weapons and accusing the United States of trying to weaken Russia and become the world's dominant power. The doctrine replaces one adopted in 1997, a time when political and military partnership with the West were still buzzwords and many Russians were optimistic about the country's economic future.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Tuesday merged three military security agencies under a new chief known for advocating military reform and, thus, apparently ended a minor Cabinet reshuffle with the suggestion that Russia may now move on its long-delayed aim of streamlining the huge ex-Soviet army. Yeltsin named Andrei A. Kokoshin, former chief of the Defense Council and State Military Inspectorate, as new secretary of the Russian Security Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1996
Jonathan Clarke (Commentary, Nov. 25) of the Cato Institute makes an excellent case not to do anything that might reignite tensions between Russia and NATO. Looking back, it is easy to see that if some different directions (and attitudes) were taken at critical junctures in history, governments could have followed a more civilized policy for geopolitics in its broadest sense. Here are a few suggestions: Eliminate the armed forces from all of the small Eastern European countries that wish to join this group.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian peacemaker Alexander I. Lebed and separatist fighters in Chechnya agreed early today to end 20 months of combat with a promise to postpone for five years a decision on the republic's independence--the separatists' main demand and the cause of the war here. "The war is over. That's it.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of Russia's secret police has criticized a presidential order to transform his ministry, the former KGB, into a new counterintelligence agency, calling it demoralizing and potentially damaging to national security. "You surely know the popular expression 'If you want to weaken performance, start a reorganization.' In this case, that is what's happening," said Nikolai M. Golushko, the man put in charge of the abrupt task by President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | Kevin Ryan, Retired Brig. Gen. Kevin Ryan is a senior fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and a former chief of staff of the Army's Space and Missile Defense Command.
Twenty years ago this December, President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev signed the only treaty in history that eliminated an entire class of weapons -- shorter- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles. The treaty commonly referred to as the INF -- Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces -- Treaty, resulted in the two countries destroying a combined 2,692 ground-based ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges of about 300 miles to 3,400 miles.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's intelligence service disclosed Sunday that it has expelled an American businessman for "activities damaging the interests of Russian state security," the third espionage allegation by the Kremlin in less than a week and a sign that the age of East-West trust may be over.
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most disruptive incident to date in an epidemic of threatened terrorist acts, police evacuated one of Moscow's three international airports Monday after a caller claimed that a bomb was about to explode at the crowded transport hub.
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