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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glasnost notwithstanding, the Soviet Union isn't perceived as a mecca for crusading journalists. Still, Yuri Shchekochihin has inspired a new generation of ambitious muckrakers. Shchekochihin, 40, is an investigative writer who works for Literaturnaya Gazeta (Literary Gazette), a prestigious weekly newspaper based in Moscow. He was prowling the streets of Los Angeles recently, searching the city's underbelly for evidence of Soviet organized crime taking root here.
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NEWS
July 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Nikita S. Khrushchev's son became a U.S. citizen Monday, choosing the material advantages of capitalism 40 years after his father vowed communism would easily surpass the American way of life. "I'm feeling like a newborn. It's the beginning of a new life," the 64-year-old Sergei Khrushchev said after taking the oath of citizenship. At his side was his wife, Valentina Golenko, who also took the oath to defend the United States.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
Kirill Dibrova, floor administrator of the fledgling Russian Stock Exchange, was warned for years about "the sharks of American capitalism." Now he and his colleagues want to swim like the sharks. For Dibrova and 19 other visiting financial professionals from the former Soviet Union and East Bloc, Wall Street has replaced the Kremlin as the font of power and influence. They took a crash course on market economics American-style--and loved it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
With obvious enthusiasm, six students in a special English class at Sutter Middle School took part in a ritual most Americans learn almost from the cradle--doing the Hokey Pokey. They put their right arms in, their right arms out, and sang, haltingly and punctuated with giggles, as they learned the song and went through the motions. For these 11-year-olds visiting the school from St. Petersburg, Russia, the ditty was only one of many things they've learned about school and life, American-style.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed Russian mob boss who operated in Brooklyn's "Little Odessa" section after entering the United States illegally was arrested with five of his associates Thursday and charged with attempting to extort millions of dollars from an investment advisory firm.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
TO FLY: Just as Yuri Karash was training to be a cosmonaut, the Soviet Union collapsed, deflating his dream of flying in space. But now the dream is revived--in a new land. While pursuing a doctorate in space policy at American University in Washington, Karash is in Houston for three months on a U.S. government subcontract, helping two Russian cosmonauts prepare for flights in U.S. spaceships in 1993 and 1995. He hopes the mission will be a launch pad for himself.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, Vytautas Barkus picks up the telephone and braces himself for more agonizing frustration. Sorry, each new operator he reaches tells him. All the circuits into the Soviet Union are busy. Please try again later. He tries again immediately. Sorry, he is told once more. Try later. It is a litany becoming all too familiar for families desperate for the sound of a loved one's voice from the Soviet Union.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | United Press International
Sporting a New York Yankees baseball cap and a smile, a 2-year-old Russian boy rushed to New York more than three months ago for emergency brain tumor surgery left for home Friday with his mother and dozens of bags of gifts. Kirill Podorozhansky had been suffering from a life-threatening tumor that had swollen his head to the size of an adult's and had severely stunted his physical and mental growth. His skull was remodeled after the tumor was removed.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
A Soviet research vessel left Seattle for San Francisco late Monday night minus as many as six passengers and crew members who were apparently unwilling to return to their troubled Soviet homeland. Dan P. Danilov, a Seattle immigration attorney representing two crewman and one passenger from the ship Academic Shirshov, said he has been in contact with three other passengers who had also indicated a desire to seek asylum or extend their visas in the United States.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed Russian mob boss who operated in Brooklyn's "Little Odessa" section after entering the United States illegally was arrested with five of his associates Thursday and charged with attempting to extort millions of dollars from an investment advisory firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1994 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elen Kuchuk stood beside her 3-month-old daughter in the neonatal intensive care unit, gently caressing the infant's tiny fingers. Kuchuk, 23, a resident of Belarus, once part of the Soviet Union, is hoping for a chance at life for her daughter, Xenia, who suffers from a rare intestinal condition. She says it's a miracle that her daughter is being treated in America.
SPORTS
December 25, 1993 | HELENE ELLIOTT and LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
NHL players with ties to the former Soviet Union are being pressured to pay protection money to guarantee their families' safety, including one incident that is being investigated by the L.A. Police Dept., according to reports Thursday and Friday. The players are denying the allegations, although it is unclear whether they are doing so out of fear of reprisals or because those incidents have been exaggerated.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
TO FLY: Just as Yuri Karash was training to be a cosmonaut, the Soviet Union collapsed, deflating his dream of flying in space. But now the dream is revived--in a new land. While pursuing a doctorate in space policy at American University in Washington, Karash is in Houston for three months on a U.S. government subcontract, helping two Russian cosmonauts prepare for flights in U.S. spaceships in 1993 and 1995. He hopes the mission will be a launch pad for himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1993 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From West Hollywood's Plummer Park to Brooklyn's Brighton Beach, thousands of Russian emigres are wrestling with a stunning offer from the homeland many of them fled in terror--an invitation to vote Sunday in the make-or-break referendum on Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin. It is the first time their government has offered expatriates worldwide the opportunity to vote.
NEWS
April 20, 1993 | Associated Press
Sergei Khrushchev, son of the late Soviet leader, became a permanent resident Monday of the country he once worked to destroy. The former Soviet missile scientist and his wife, Valentina, 45, were granted permanent resident status after a routine, 15-minute interview with immigration officials. Khrushchev, 57, said he was not sure what his father, Nikita, would have thought of his decision to remain in the United States, where he has lectured and written under a fellowship since September,
NEWS
January 13, 1987
Twelve more former Soviet citizens who emigrated to the United States returned to the Soviet Union, saying they could not adapt to the American way of life, Tass news agency reported. Tass quoted one returnee from New York, Olga Gross, a mother of three who went to the United States seven years ago, as saying she has great respect for America but that its way of life did not suit her. Her musician husband, Anatoly, said family members lived well materially but yearned for their homeland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer who visited the Soviet Union two months ago as part of an unusual cop swap returned with an unanticipated souvenir: a Russian mystery to solve. So it is fitting that Sgt. Greg Braun used an unorthodox method to crack the case. He called upon a private investigator to unravel the secret of the missing Russian immigrants. The mystery landed in Braun's lap in July when as he was visiting the U.S.S.R. with a delegation of police officers from Kern and Orange counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1992 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
'It's too huge," exclaimed Natasha Shirikova, a Russian exchange student, as she took her first look inside a Price Club on Wednesday. Igor Ivanov strolled the aisles of the discount warehouse store in Northridge looking for calculators, but he was sidetracked by a Sega video game. Ruslan Severan piled cassette tapes into his shopping cart. "They are a little bit cheaper here," he said.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
Kirill Dibrova, floor administrator of the fledgling Russian Stock Exchange, was warned for years about "the sharks of American capitalism." Now he and his colleagues want to swim like the sharks. For Dibrova and 19 other visiting financial professionals from the former Soviet Union and East Bloc, Wall Street has replaced the Kremlin as the font of power and influence. They took a crash course on market economics American-style--and loved it.
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