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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
To drive these days through Great Lakes cities - Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, among others - is to drive through the nation's industrial past. The iconic images have become Rust Belt cliché: weed-choked parking lots, windowless houses, cold factories stripped of their metals and open to the elements. But there are human stories behind those static images, and author and journalist Edward McClelland digs deeply into them for his empathetic new book, "Nothin' but Blues Skies: The Heyday, Hard Times, and Hopes of America's Industrial Heartland.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
Looking for a cheap fixer-upper? You might check the list of the 15 best cities for do-it-yourself housing bargains, published this week by RealtyTrac, the Irvine-based real estate data firm. Shocker: No California cities made the list. The five best cities to find a bargain home are in the Rust Belt: Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis and Cincinnati.  The rankings come from the number of bank-owned homes that were built before 1960 and are valued under $100,000.  There are 3,773 such homes in Detroit, which is more than double Chicago's inventory, which is ranked just below the Michigan city.  Phoenix is the closest city to Southern California that made the list and ranks No. 8 on the list with 763 such homes.
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BUSINESS
October 1, 2004 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
To make money on Wall Street these days, try getting your hands dirty. That was the lesson of the third quarter that ended on Thursday. In a down market overall -- the Standard & Poor's 500 index dipped 2.3% in the three months -- shares of companies in such heavy-industry sectors as steel, mining and energy exploration racked up big gains. It was a continuation of a rally that had lifted those Rust Belt issues in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
To drive these days through Great Lakes cities - Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, among others - is to drive through the nation's industrial past. The iconic images have become Rust Belt cliché: weed-choked parking lots, windowless houses, cold factories stripped of their metals and open to the elements. But there are human stories behind those static images, and author and journalist Edward McClelland digs deeply into them for his empathetic new book, "Nothin' but Blues Skies: The Heyday, Hard Times, and Hopes of America's Industrial Heartland.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2009 | By Todd Woody
At a recent solar energy conference in Anaheim, economic development officials from Ohio talked up a state that seemed far removed from the solar panels and high-tech devices that dominated the convention floor. Ohio, long known for its smokestack auto plants and metal-bending factories, would be an ideal place for green technology companies to set up shop, they said. "People don't traditionally think of Ohio when they think of solar," said Lisa Patt-McDaniel, director of Ohio's economic development agency.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting astride the meandering Rock River, this city looks about as ordinary as a Midwestern cornfield. But its blandness is deceptive. During the last 25 years, Rockford has played a symbolic role in a high drama: the transformation of the American economy. An old-line industrial city known primarily for manufacturing machine tools and fasteners, Rockford in much of the 1970s and '80s was a Rust Belt town that the economy seemed to have left behind. In 1982, the jobless rate here hit 25%.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Some days, Jack Scott is sure he's dreaming. Scott, who heads the Chamber of Commerce in this central Ohio city of 8,500, is overseeing what has become a Rust Belt rarity--unprecedented economic growth bringing new people and money to his hometown and other communities in central and west central Ohio. The catalyst for the change is Honda of America Manufacturing Inc.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1988 | Associated Press
A Rust Belt renaissance gave America's mightiest manufacturers record sales and soaring profits last year, despite fears of a recession raised by the October stock crash, Fortune magazine said Wednesday in its annual elite ranking of the 500 biggest U.S. industrial companies. "The good times finally roll," the magazine said in a cover story on the latest Fortune 500 list, contained in its April 25 issue available on newsstands Monday.
NEWS
March 14, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shaking off the Super Tuesday defeats that all but doomed his chance for the Republican presidential nomination, Patrick J. Buchanan has launched the latest gambit in his populist campaign: seeking "converts" among working-class Democrats in the Rust Belt. Buchanan conceded on Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole has a "prohibitive" delegate lead after his sweep of Tuesday's primaries in seven states.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sale that many in this blue-collar city thought they would never see: Health-tex, the venerable children's apparel maker, was closing its Gadsden plant. Everything was on the auction block--sewing machines, mannequins, time clocks, even the cavernous yellow brick building itself. An auctioneer's cry sent a symbolic shiver throughout a region that long considered itself immune to economic trends that have ravaged and reshaped other parts of the country.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Unemployment rates dropped in 281 metro areas throughout the country in October, but many of the areas that performed best were in the Rust Belt, thanks to a manufacturing renaissance. The region with the largest decrease in the unemployment rate in the country was Muskegon-Norton Shores, Mich., which saw unemployment drop 2.6 percentage points from October 2010 to 9%, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Flint and Jackson, Mich., saw significant drops of 2.5% each.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
The nation's Rust Belt once ran on union power, its factories and steel mills employing Democratic-voting union members who got regular pay raises and good pensions. Now the region is at the vanguard of a national backlash against organized labor, as newly elected Republican governors and legislatures try to control costs by weakening ? or virtually eliminating ? unions of government workers. FOR THE RECORD: Midwest unions: An article in the Feb. 19 LATExtra section about labor unrest in the Midwest erroneously reported one result of a Pew Research Center survey on views of organized labor.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
In the Inland Empire and other former home-building hot spots, the housing bust has created a new kind of declining city, different from the nation's traditional rusting centers of industry, that could languish for years. Although the causes of the decline in these metropolitan areas are distinct from the loss of employment from shrinking manufacturing and industry in some of the nation's old industrial powerhouses, these areas could experience fates similar to places such as Cleveland and Detroit, with neighborhoods experiencing high rates of vacancies for a very long time, according to a study to be released Thursday.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2011 | By John Gallagher
Detroit and other Rust Belt cities hoping to reverse decades of decline are finding new inspiration in unexpected places: the older industrial cities of Europe. In recent weeks, leaders from Detroit, Cleveland and other Midwest cities have traveled to Europe as part of a Cities in Transition exchange. One trip, which came after a visit to Turin, Italy, took leaders to Leipzig, Germany, and Manchester, England. All three cities are reversing decades of job losses and population decline.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Americans went to the polls Tuesday to select a record 37 governors, with Republicans making big gains and garnering political advantages for the decade to come. Republicans picked up at least 10 governorships Tuesday night, with some states still too close to call. Democrats won back the office in California and held on to it in New York, where Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo comfortably defeated a "tea party"-backed rival. Meanwhile, Republican incumbent Rick Perry won reelection in Texas.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
This Rust Belt city understood the pain of recession long before the rest of the nation, when the factories started closing and few opportunities arrived in their place. The area helped send Barack Obama to the White House, hearing his message of hope and change. But fears of government overreach soon crowded that out.On the radio, a local car dealership tries to move Fords by advertising as "the guys that didn't take the bailout. " This political season, voters have faced the lingering economic morass, an endless loop of attack ads and, at the top of the state's ticket, a governor's race that features mad-as-hell "tea party" candidate Carl Paladino.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | REX W. HUPPKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In places like Skooter's Family Restaurant, amid the smell of cigarette smoke and bottomless cups of coffee, thoughts of an economic slowdown churn like an empty stomach. Factory workers belly up to the counter for casual conversation, but in the back of many minds, from this diner to kitchen tables to gas pumps and grocery store aisles across the Midwest, there's concern. Concern that a job may be gone tomorrow. Concern that the good times may be winding down.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until state planning collapsed with the Soviet Union at the start of this decade, Valentina Lukshina never had to make a major decision about her life. She studied metallurgy because she came from the coal-mining region of Novokuznetsk. She then moved to this remote steelmaking city in the "distribution"--a Soviet-era practice of deploying college graduates wherever the state deemed their labor most needed.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2010 | By David Pierson
Six months after graduating from university, Guan Jian was unemployed and living in an 8-by-8-foot rented room on the fringes of this sprawling capital. His quarters were so hastily built that the landlord didn't bother to include a bathroom. When duty calls, Guan must trudge to the neighborhood toilet. Yet at $65 a month, it's all he can afford. Money is so tight at times that he has learned to suppress his hunger with a single steamed bun a day. This wasn't how things were supposed to be for Guan, a 24-year-old broadcast journalism graduate who sports an easy smile and has a love affair with foreign film.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2009 | By P.J. Huffstutter
On the city's east side, where auto workers once assembled cars by the millions, nature is taking back the land. Cottonwood trees grow through the collapsed roofs of homes stripped clean for scrap metal. Wild grasses carpet the rusty shells of empty factories, now home to pheasants and wild turkeys. This green veil is proof of how far this city has fallen from its industrial heyday and, to a small group of investors, a clear sign. Detroit, they say, needs to get back to what it was before Henry Ford moved to town: farmland.
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