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Rusty Kennedy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996
One man in Orange County has improved the quality of our life. We are often not aware of it because he works behind the scenes, in schools and wherever he can to heal the beginnings of racial tension. He is Rusty Kennedy, executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission, a man whose intelligence, experience and altruistic efforts make our community a better place to live. Let us do what we can to support him and show our appreciation for his efforts to bring about better understanding and respect for each other.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The number of reported hate crimes in Orange County fell by 21% last year, even though such crimes based on sexual orientation almost doubled, according to a report released Thursday. The Orange County Human Relations Commission found that 61 hate crimes were reported to authorities in 2012, continuing a general downward trend since reported hate crimes peaked at 101 in 2006. The most frequent target, the commission said, were blacks and people perceived to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
Re "Confronting Hate Crime" (Jan. 2): What do you want to bet that "hate crimes" in Orange County will expand to fill the capacity of Rusty Kennedy's taxpayer-supported department (Human Relations Commission) and will therefore justify his salary and budget? Certainly it is in his best interests to seek out and find every hate crime possible. And, of course, this gives The Times material for another article. I heard a black call a white guy "white trash" recently. Will The Times and Kennedy do anything about this hate crime or is it only whites who can commit hate crimes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Re "Fear of Differences Is Just Another Way We're All Alike," Orange County Voices, Jan. 25: Orange County Human Relations Commission Executive Director Rusty Kennedy speaks about hate crimes in Orange County but fails to identify the major cause. Baron Montesquieu's "The Spirit of Laws" was well-known to the founders [of our country]. In it, he wrote that the guarantee of equality of opportunity was essential to freedom and that the pursuit of equality of outcome was inimical to liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
Re "Fear of Differences Is Just Another Way We're All Alike," Orange County Voices, Jan. 25: Orange County Human Relations Commission Executive Director Rusty Kennedy speaks about hate crimes in Orange County but fails to identify the major cause. Baron Montesquieu's "The Spirit of Laws" was well-known to the founders [of our country]. In it, he wrote that the guarantee of equality of opportunity was essential to freedom and that the pursuit of equality of outcome was inimical to liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994
Rusty Kennedy asks us to not simply condemn racism and bigotry but to take an introspective look at our own roles in either stopping or furthering hatred ("Is It a Fanatic Few Who Are 'Anti,' or Our Society at Large?" April 10). He encourages us to form relationships with others different from ourselves and develop respect and appreciation for one another. His words and actions will inevitably lead to an increased sense of community in Orange County that will benefit all who live here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990
When Maria Bird, a five-year volunteer for SOS, said, "Welcome to gorgeous Orange County, home of the heartless," we well understood the bitterness that filled her heart at the thought of men, women and little children left to hunger, sicken and, in many cases, die. Some 200,000 in all die each year, not in darkest Africa, not in poverty-stricken India, but here in Orange County, surrounded by wealth, millionaires and even billionaires in this...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1989
I disagree with Rusty Kennedy, director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission, who is quoted in The Times (Feb. 11) as saying there is no anti-Semitism in the county. All he need do is wear a Star of David and he'll learn about anti-Jewish sentiment in Orange County. I run an editorial bureau for a Boston-based newspaper, and my wife is a receptionist at a medical clinic. Both of us have seen and experienced anti-Semitism, blatant and otherwise. A common example, which I have heard far too often here, is using the noun "Jew" as a verb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The number of reported hate crimes in Orange County fell by 21% last year, even though such crimes based on sexual orientation almost doubled, according to a report released Thursday. The Orange County Human Relations Commission found that 61 hate crimes were reported to authorities in 2012, continuing a general downward trend since reported hate crimes peaked at 101 in 2006. The most frequent target, the commission said, were blacks and people perceived to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
When Rusty Kennedy arrived at work Monday he came with a mission and immediately set about seeing it through. The task for the 37-year-old executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission was to defuse a growing controversy over remarks made by Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. It was a situation, Kennedy says, that was "spiraling out of control." The week before, Fry had voted to deny a parade permit sought by the South Vietnamese Armed Forces Committee and stunned community leaders by saying, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996
One man in Orange County has improved the quality of our life. We are often not aware of it because he works behind the scenes, in schools and wherever he can to heal the beginnings of racial tension. He is Rusty Kennedy, executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission, a man whose intelligence, experience and altruistic efforts make our community a better place to live. Let us do what we can to support him and show our appreciation for his efforts to bring about better understanding and respect for each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994
Rusty Kennedy asks us to not simply condemn racism and bigotry but to take an introspective look at our own roles in either stopping or furthering hatred ("Is It a Fanatic Few Who Are 'Anti,' or Our Society at Large?" April 10). He encourages us to form relationships with others different from ourselves and develop respect and appreciation for one another. His words and actions will inevitably lead to an increased sense of community in Orange County that will benefit all who live here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission warned Sunday that the recent Los Angeles riots could be a "snapshot" of Orange County's future if its people don't erase some of the racial barriers that divide them. "We're at a crossroads," Russell Kennedy told a gathering of about 50 at Chapman University. "We have to decide whether we're going to go toward isolation--by building higher walls to separate ourselves from each other--or toward embracing (ethnic) diversity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
Re "Confronting Hate Crime" (Jan. 2): What do you want to bet that "hate crimes" in Orange County will expand to fill the capacity of Rusty Kennedy's taxpayer-supported department (Human Relations Commission) and will therefore justify his salary and budget? Certainly it is in his best interests to seek out and find every hate crime possible. And, of course, this gives The Times material for another article. I heard a black call a white guy "white trash" recently. Will The Times and Kennedy do anything about this hate crime or is it only whites who can commit hate crimes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990
When Maria Bird, a five-year volunteer for SOS, said, "Welcome to gorgeous Orange County, home of the heartless," we well understood the bitterness that filled her heart at the thought of men, women and little children left to hunger, sicken and, in many cases, die. Some 200,000 in all die each year, not in darkest Africa, not in poverty-stricken India, but here in Orange County, surrounded by wealth, millionaires and even billionaires in this...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989 | Rusty Kennedy
During 1989, many Orange County residents wrote about their thoughts and feelings in commentary pieces for Orange County opinion pages. As the year comes to a close, we look back on some of those thoughts. Name-calling, tire-slashing, thrown objects and violent physical assaults are a regular part of weekend nights in Orange County near gay and lesbian social centers, as bigoted criminals prey on people assumed to be gay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission warned Sunday that the recent Los Angeles riots could be a "snapshot" of Orange County's future if its people don't erase some of the racial barriers that divide them. "We're at a crossroads," Russell Kennedy told a gathering of about 50 at Chapman University. "We have to decide whether we're going to go toward isolation--by building higher walls to separate ourselves from each other--or toward embracing (ethnic) diversity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989 | Rusty Kennedy
During 1989, many Orange County residents wrote about their thoughts and feelings in commentary pieces for Orange County opinion pages. As the year comes to a close, we look back on some of those thoughts. Name-calling, tire-slashing, thrown objects and violent physical assaults are a regular part of weekend nights in Orange County near gay and lesbian social centers, as bigoted criminals prey on people assumed to be gay.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
When Rusty Kennedy arrived at work Monday he came with a mission and immediately set about seeing it through. The task for the 37-year-old executive director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission was to defuse a growing controversy over remarks made by Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. It was a situation, Kennedy says, that was "spiraling out of control." The week before, Fry had voted to deny a parade permit sought by the South Vietnamese Armed Forces Committee and stunned community leaders by saying, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1989
I disagree with Rusty Kennedy, director of the Orange County Human Relations Commission, who is quoted in The Times (Feb. 11) as saying there is no anti-Semitism in the county. All he need do is wear a Star of David and he'll learn about anti-Jewish sentiment in Orange County. I run an editorial bureau for a Boston-based newspaper, and my wife is a receptionist at a medical clinic. Both of us have seen and experienced anti-Semitism, blatant and otherwise. A common example, which I have heard far too often here, is using the noun "Jew" as a verb.
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