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Ruth Ann Swenson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Los Angeles saw a production of "Lucia di Lammermoor" last year in which the walls of the castle tilted and tumbled to reflect the titular heroine's increasingly distressed mental state . . . A year earlier, the Metropolitan Opera gave New York a "Lucia" in which the characters picked their way through open coffins and chapel ruins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Soprano Ruth Ann Swenson has withdrawn from a New York City Opera production this fall to recuperate from treatments after surgery for breast cancer. Swenson was operated on in October and sang at the Metropolitan Opera in March and April as Marguerite in Gounod's "Faust" and Cleopatra in Handel's "Giulio Cesare." She had been scheduled to perform in Handel's "Agrippina" Oct. 14 through Nov. 2; City Opera said Friday she will be replaced by Nelly Miricioiu.
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NEWS
October 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
International opera star Ruth Ann Swenson has been diagnosed with breast cancer, her publicist said Wednesday. The 43-year-old soprano, who has just completed singing the leading role of Marguerite in Gounod's "Faust" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, will undergo surgery Tuesday at Memorial Sloane-Kettering Cancer Center. In a statement released by publicist Georgiana Francisco, Swenson said her prognosis was excellent "and I look forward to returning to the Met in the spring."
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
International opera star Ruth Ann Swenson has been diagnosed with breast cancer, her publicist said Wednesday. The 43-year-old soprano, who has just completed singing the leading role of Marguerite in Gounod's "Faust" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, will undergo surgery Tuesday at Memorial Sloane-Kettering Cancer Center. In a statement released by publicist Georgiana Francisco, Swenson said her prognosis was excellent "and I look forward to returning to the Met in the spring."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Soprano Ruth Ann Swenson has withdrawn from a New York City Opera production this fall to recuperate from treatments after surgery for breast cancer. Swenson was operated on in October and sang at the Metropolitan Opera in March and April as Marguerite in Gounod's "Faust" and Cleopatra in Handel's "Giulio Cesare." She had been scheduled to perform in Handel's "Agrippina" Oct. 14 through Nov. 2; City Opera said Friday she will be replaced by Nelly Miricioiu.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2001 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar
In opera, as in all of the dramatic arts, being funny is serious business. Although the star-crossed fates and tragic diva deaths of opera seria may loom larger in the public consciousness, comedic opera forms an important part of the standard repertory. What's more, for all its froth, the comic opera, or opera buffa, is no less demanding than its dour and dire sibling. Some consider Gaetano Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" among the best of the buffas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Opera Pacific's Coming Attractions: Opera Pacific has announced plans to mount Wagner's "Die Walkure" in Orange County in 1994, with Ealynn Voss as Brunnhilde. It would be the company's first production of a German opera. Later that season, the company will present Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor," with Ruth Ann Swenson singing the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2008 | Chris Pasles
Tenor Bryan Hymel, 28, from Philadelphia, won the $12,000 first prize at the 36th annual Loren L. Zachary National Vocal Competition finals Sunday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles. Soprano Angela Meade, 30, from Philadelphia took the $10,000 second prize. New York soprano Julianna Di Giacomo, 33, won the $8,000 third prize. Ten finalists, drawn from 235 applicants, participated in the finals with the Los Angeles Performing Arts Orchestra, conducted by Frank Fetta. Past Zachary winners have included Thomas Hampson, Aprile Millo, Ruth Ann Swenson and Deborah Voigt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
Opera Pacific has announced plans to mount Wagner's "Die Walkure" in Orange County in 1994. It would be the company's first production of a German opera. Ealynn Voss, seen locally in the title role of Puccini's "Turandot" in 1990, is to sing Brunnhilde. Later that season, the company says, it will present Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor" here, with Ruth Ann Swenson singing the title role. (The Los Angeles Music Center Opera will present "Lucia" this coming May.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2001 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Sunday Calendar
In opera, as in all of the dramatic arts, being funny is serious business. Although the star-crossed fates and tragic diva deaths of opera seria may loom larger in the public consciousness, comedic opera forms an important part of the standard repertory. What's more, for all its froth, the comic opera, or opera buffa, is no less demanding than its dour and dire sibling. Some consider Gaetano Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" among the best of the buffas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Los Angeles saw a production of "Lucia di Lammermoor" last year in which the walls of the castle tilted and tumbled to reflect the titular heroine's increasingly distressed mental state . . . A year earlier, the Metropolitan Opera gave New York a "Lucia" in which the characters picked their way through open coffins and chapel ruins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
Campbell Dickson Titus III, 76, an internationally known voice instructor who taught some of the most significant names in opera today. Born in Denver, Titus earned a bachelor's degree in political science at Stanford University and a master's degree in music history from UC Berkeley. After earning his bachelor's degree, Titus moved to Europe, where he studied vocal technique and performance for the next 10 years.
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