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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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OPINION
March 19, 2014
Re "Much depends on Ginsburg," Opinion, March 16 As a lawyer and an Irvine resident, I respect and commend Erwin Chemerinsky for what he's done as the founding dean of the UC Irvine Law School. But he's wrong to say that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should resign soon so President Obama can put someone like her on the court. No one currently on the court is as intelligent and respectful of the Constitution as Ginsburg. Her opinions and dissents are based on the law and articulated so as to make her a stalwart defender of the rights of all people, not just those with money and power.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014
Re "Much depends on Ginsburg," Opinion, March 16 As a lawyer and an Irvine resident, I respect and commend Erwin Chemerinsky for what he's done as the founding dean of the UC Irvine Law School. But he's wrong to say that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should resign soon so President Obama can put someone like her on the court. No one currently on the court is as intelligent and respectful of the Constitution as Ginsburg. Her opinions and dissents are based on the law and articulated so as to make her a stalwart defender of the rights of all people, not just those with money and power.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1993
I am now confused by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's call for equality between the sexes. She says, "It is essential to a woman's equality with man that she be the decision-maker, that her choice be controlling" (July 22). Women have something men will never be have, the miracle to bear life. Now it's important to reduce this ability to be equal with men. I find this to be completely in error. There is a tragic thought that a fetus is a nonentity in the first trimester. At the point of conception, the embryo is living and growing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Broadcasters are hoping that the daughter of a Supreme Court justice can help them convince the high court that Aereo -- the start-up service that streams local TV signals via the Internet -- is illegal and needs to be shutdown. In their 65-page briefing filed Monday to the Supreme Court, broadcasters -- including ABC, CBS, NBCUniversal, Fox and Los Angeles Times parent Tribune Co. -- cited work critical of a lower court ruling favoring Aereo by Jane Ginsburg, a professor at Columbia University's School of Law and daughter of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  In an April 2013 article for the Media Institute that was cited twice, Ginsburg called a ruling in support of Aereo by the U.S. 2nd  Circuit Court of Appeals, a "decision so inconsistent with statutory text and policy as to inspire surmise that the ruling was an April Fool's prank.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Michael McGough
How old is too old for a Supreme Court justice?   Eighty-year-old Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has told a reporter that she is in excellent health and plans to remain on the court for several more years. Ginsburg told Joan Biskupic of Reuters that she wants to stay on the bench at least as long Justice Louis Brandeis, which would mean remaining until April 2016. She also said her new “model” was Justice John Paul Stevens, who retired at the age 90 in 2010. (Stevens is still active on the public-speaking circuit.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Georgetown University law professor Martin D. Ginsburg, the husband of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, died Sunday of cancer, the Supreme Court announced. He was 78. Though he was among the nation's foremost experts on tax law, Ginsburg relished his role as the outgoing half of one of Washington's prominent couples. Marty and Ruth Ginsburg were married for 56 years, and friends often described theirs as a successful marriage of two seemingly quite different individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | LINDA HIRSHMAN and JANE E. LARSON, Linda Hirshman is a professor of law and director of the Women's Legal Studies Institute at Chicago-Kent College of Law. Jane Larson is an associate professor at Northwestern University School of Law. and
The Supreme Court ruled this week that a boss who called his female manager a "dumb-ass woman," asked her to fish in his pants pocket for coins and suggested that she negotiate her raise by going with him to a nearby motel violated the Civil Rights Act. In an opinion written by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the court ruled unanimously that such behavior does not have to cause the employee severe psychological injury to be ruled harassment.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | Associated Press
Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg has won the American Bar Assn.'s highest rating of "well qualified," the White House legal office said Tuesday. The ABA's 15-member standing committee on the federal judiciary voted unanimously to give Ginsburg its highest rating, White House lawyer Ron Klain said. An ABA spokeswoman confirmed his comment. Ginsburg, a federal appellate judge for the past 13 years, is President Clinton's first nominee to the nation's highest court.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Colon cancer survivor Ruth Bader Ginsburg made rare public remarks about her illness this week and urged all middle-age women to get tested for a disease often associated with men. "If you are a woman at or near what the French call 'a certain age,' have a colonoscopy," the 68-year-old U.S. Supreme Court justice said in an address to the Society for Women's Health Research. The Washington-based group asked Ginsburg to talk about her cancer, which was diagnosed in 1999.
OPINION
June 2, 2013
Re "Court lifts time limit on appeals," May 29 Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's intemperate use of invective - "blooper reel," "feeble" and "bizarre" - against the majority opinion written by a fellow justice (in this case the revered Ruth Bader Ginsburg) continues to astound as he continues to diminish the dignity of our Supreme Court. Is Scalia auditioning for "Judge Judy"? June Maguire Mission Viejo ALSO: Letters: More on bioterrorism Letters: No more child deaths Letters: Forgetting about Alzheimer's
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
It's the first week of October, which puts the U.S. Supreme Court in focus in a way it almost never is unless chads are hanging - as in the 2000 post-election mess - or the justices are rendering decisions on fraught subjects like gay marriage or Obamacare. This term, which opened Monday, may extend last year's run of cases with high political content. The court is expected to reach judgments on campaign finance, abortion, religion and the healthcare plan's contraception rules, among other issues.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Michael McGough
How old is too old for a Supreme Court justice?   Eighty-year-old Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has told a reporter that she is in excellent health and plans to remain on the court for several more years. Ginsburg told Joan Biskupic of Reuters that she wants to stay on the bench at least as long Justice Louis Brandeis, which would mean remaining until April 2016. She also said her new “model” was Justice John Paul Stevens, who retired at the age 90 in 2010. (Stevens is still active on the public-speaking circuit.)
NATIONAL
June 20, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The government may not require people or groups to "pledge allegiance" to its policies as a condition of obtaining grants, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in a broad defense of the 1st Amendment's protection of freedom of speech. The 6-2 decision written by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. strikes down part of a federal law that requires groups that receive funding to fight AIDS overseas to announce policies "opposing prostitution and sex trafficking. " Since 2003, Congress has appropriated billions of dollars for funding organizations that combat HIV and AIDS.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court ruled Monday that brand-name drug makers can be sued for violating the antitrust laws if they make a deal that pays a potential competitor to put off selling a generic version. The 5-3 decision is likely to benefit consumers with lower prices. The Federal Trade Commission, which has pursued suits against the drug makers, estimated these so-called “pay for delay” deals cost consumers and health plans $3.5 billion a year. The ruling is likely to send a warning to drug makers who wish to deter generic rivals from entering the market.
OPINION
June 2, 2013
Re "Court lifts time limit on appeals," May 29 Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's intemperate use of invective - "blooper reel," "feeble" and "bizarre" - against the majority opinion written by a fellow justice (in this case the revered Ruth Bader Ginsburg) continues to astound as he continues to diminish the dignity of our Supreme Court. Is Scalia auditioning for "Judge Judy"? June Maguire Mission Viejo ALSO: Letters: More on bioterrorism Letters: No more child deaths Letters: Forgetting about Alzheimer's
OPINION
October 30, 2012 | By Erwin Chemerinsky
The future of the Supreme Court is the forgotten issue in this year's presidential election. This is surprising and disturbing because a president's picks for the federal judiciary are one of the most long-lasting legacies of any presidency. There is a sharp contrast between the types of individuals that Barack Obama and Mitt Romney would place on the Supreme Court and the lower federal courts, yet neither is saying much about it. Recent history powerfully shows the importance of presidential elections to Supreme Court decision-making.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | Associated Press
Senators praised Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Monday as a cautious judge who is unlikely to push an ideological agenda on the high court. "Judge Ginsburg's judicial record and style mark her as a true consensus candidate" who also understands "what liberty and equality mean," Judiciary Committee Chairman Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.) told colleagues. Ginsburg appeared all but certain to win confirmation in the Senate vote scheduled for today.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | From Times Staff Writer
Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Supreme Court nominee Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg will begin July 20, meaning that she could be confirmed by the Senate before its summer recess begins on Aug. 6. This would meet the accelerated schedule urged by President Clinton, who selected the 60-year-old federal appellate judge Monday to succeed retiring Justice Byron R. White. Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By David G. Savage, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of President Obama 's healthcare law Thursday, ruling the government may impose tax penalties on persons who do not have health insurance. The court's long-awaited ruling rejected a broad legal attack on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act brought by Republican state officials and the National Federation of Independent Business. The legal challenge focused on the law's so-called mandate that all must have insurance by 2014 or pay a tax penalty.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By David Lauter
How well can Supreme Court votes be predicted by what justices say in oral arguments? The statistics hold up pretty well, and offer gloomy tidings for the Obama administration and its healthcare law. Reporters and analysts who cover the court approach predicting the justices in various ways - - some more confident in their judgment than others. But, as with so many things in life, researchers actually have studied the question. Their finding backs up a long-standing intuition of lawyers and experienced journalists alike: If a justice keeps interrupting you with questions, your side is in trouble.
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