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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1991 | ZION BANKS
When money and encouragement were short, as they usually were, for black students in Orange County who dreamed of college, Ruth Fox was there for 40 years. Fox, 78, and a small group of women have helped more than 130 teen-agers go to college. Somebody had to, she said. "When our kids were in school, they would have counselors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1991 | ZION BANKS
When money and encouragement were short, as they usually were, for black students in Orange County who dreamed of college, Ruth Fox was there for 40 years. Fox, 78, and a small group of women have helped more than 130 teen-agers go to college. Somebody had to, she said. "When our kids were in school, they would have counselors.
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NEWS
June 5, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
The scene: Premiere of "Patriot Games"--as in the CIA, as in the IRA, as in the Tom Clancy bestseller, as in the anticipated big-grossing summer flick starring Harrison Ford. The event at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Wednesday night was a fund-raiser by the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Women's Guild. The audience review: Fast-paced and exciting, if rather implausible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997
It was with tremendous regret that I read your Feb. 17 article on the closing of Camarillo State Hospital. Not so many years ago, California put itself in the national vanguard in the care and treatment of its mentally ill population with legislation funding appropriate interventions, treatments and follow-up of persons with psychiatric illnesses. California also led the way in implementing principles of patients' rights, providing guarantees of standards of care, respectful treatment and protection of confidentiality and civil rights during and after treatment.
BOOKS
June 25, 1995 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review
"I am large. I contain multitudes," Walt Whitman wrote, and Pat Conroy, on behalf of his best-selling novels, could say the same thing. In "Beach Music," the author of "The Great Santini," "The Lords of Discipline" and "The Prince of Tides" just gets larger. His narrator is a 6-foot-6 travel writer and gourmet cook, Jack McCall, who stuffs himself and everyone else in the novel with exotic and mouth-watering fare, calories be damned.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES
This won't hurt a bit. Here come the charity world's champion benefit givers, determined to separate people from their tax-deductible dollars with no pain at all. Former First Lady Betty Ford--long before it became politically popular--was involved in "substance control," raising millions of dollars for her Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage. As one close associate said, "Few people doing charity work have actually saved a life. With Betty. . . ."
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | MARYLOUISE OATES
There are leftovers--like the little Tupperware container with peas that works its way first to the back of the refrigerator, then to the front again. And then there are leftovers like the luscious piece of lasagna that is better for breakfast than it was for dinner. Here are some luscious leftovers that for some reason did not make the column the past few weeks: The Liberty Hill Foundation, at its 10th annual fund-raising dinner, honored Harry Belafonte and netted $60,000.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center will open a hospice ward next month to help terminally ill patients and their families come to terms with death. The ward, one of the first of its kind in Los Angeles, expands the hospital's 5-year-old outpatient hospice program to inpatient care, said Dr. Robert Taub, medical director of the program. "It will be for patients with symptoms so acute or pain so severe that they cannot be managed at home," Taub said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Paul Hume, the longtime music critic for the Washington Post who drew a famous and furious rebuke from President Harry S. Truman when he panned a singing recital given by his daughter, died of pneumonia Monday in a Baltimore nursing home. He was 85. A man of vast learning, Hume had a notable ability for making his subject interesting to audiences of widely varying degrees of knowledge. He enjoyed the esteem of some of the greatest figures in the world of classical music.
SPORTS
September 28, 2007 | JERRY CROWE
Major NBA trades are rarely made between teams in the same conference, much less the same division, so Lakers fans hoping to see Shawn Marion playing alongside Kobe Bryant this season shouldn't hold their breath. . . . Marion, who wants out of Phoenix, probably would be better suited to the Washington Wizards' frenetic style than to Phil Jackson's triangle. . . . Tiger Woods finds it laughable that competitors in sports other than golf would police themselves in the same way that golfers do. . .
NEWS
August 26, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
These dog days of August are the times that try columnists' hearts. Nothing, literally almost nothing, happens to write about--so what a thrill when two fab breakfasts come one's way, and one of them is with Dick Clark. (The other was with the Cedars-Sinai Women's Guild, which is no slouch either.) Chatting over melon in the Polo Lounge, Clark told of his upcoming inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records--the recipient of the first Guinness Supreme Achievement Award.
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