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Ruth Harriet Louise

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July 21, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch is a contributing writer to the Book Review and the author, most recently, of "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
"Less than 5% of the artists in the Modern Art Sections are women," proclaims a poster issued by an art collective called the Guerrilla Girls in 1989, "but 85% of the nudes are female." A healthy corrective to the plight of women in the art world, however, can be found in "Art/Women/California," an impressive and illuminating survey of art by women in California during the last half of the 20th century.
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December 8, 2002 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Beat Poets Edited by Carmela Ciuraru Alfred A. Knopf: 236 pp., $12.50 "Kerouac opened a million coffee bars," quipped Beat novelist William S. Burroughs about the so-called King of the Beat Generation, "and sold a million pairs of Levi's to both sexes." But the fact is that far more people talk about the Beats than read their work, which is exactly why Carmela Ciuraru's "Beat Poets," a title in the Everyman's Pocket Poets series, is such an essential volume.
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BOOKS
December 8, 2002 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Beat Poets Edited by Carmela Ciuraru Alfred A. Knopf: 236 pp., $12.50 "Kerouac opened a million coffee bars," quipped Beat novelist William S. Burroughs about the so-called King of the Beat Generation, "and sold a million pairs of Levi's to both sexes." But the fact is that far more people talk about the Beats than read their work, which is exactly why Carmela Ciuraru's "Beat Poets," a title in the Everyman's Pocket Poets series, is such an essential volume.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art historians have a tough job. To find work in an increasingly competitive market, they have two options: Come up with an original interpretation of art their peers are familiar with, or discover someone who has been overlooked by the art-history industry. The latter is easier, but it's still fraught with difficulty. More often than not, historians who focus on the work of an unknown artist exaggerate its significance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
"I have always said--and I still say it right out in print," wrote Louella Parsons, doyenne of Hollywood gossip columnists, in March 1929, "that one of the finest photographers I know is a woman. I speak of Ruth Harriet Louise, who has made Marion Davies, Norma Shearer and other M-G-M beauties even more beautiful." At the time, Louise was only 26 and had already been MGM's chief portrait photographer for four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Art historians have a tough job. To find work in an increasingly competitive market, they have two options: Come up with an original interpretation of art their peers are familiar with, or discover someone who has been overlooked by the art-history industry. The latter is easier, but it's still fraught with difficulty. More often than not, historians who focus on the work of an unknown artist exaggerate its significance.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG, Mary Helen Berg is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
John Wayne Airport, unlike its namesake, doesn't usually evoke images of movie-star glamour. But through Aug. 23 travelers can find a trace of cinematic allure there in "Lost Hollywood," an exhibit of 75 black and white photographs from Hollywood's golden years, 1916 to 1933, presented by the airport's arts commission. The vintage photos in the touring exhibition were collected and published in a book of the same title by Jack Woody, owner of Twelvetrees Press.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's springtime in Santa Barbara. Or is it springtime in Paris? It's hard to tell these days. A series of cultural events, including theater, film and music, will be presented throughout Santa Barbara through April 29, all under the heading "Parisian Spring." The festivities are in conjunction with an exhibit of Auguste Rodin sculptures at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.
NEWS
June 9, 2005 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
The movies made Garbo a star, but the stills made her an icon. At the height of her fame, her lustrous visage was captured in hundreds of photographs and disseminated through newspapers, movie magazines and theater posters. Through them we could admire, at leisure, every beautiful detail -- the arched brows, the deep-set eyes, the milky complexion, the unhappy mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2008 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
From the time he was a schoolboy, John Kobal was in love with Hollywood. He longed to become a part of it, and eventually he did -- by befriending faded movie stars and forgotten photographers, enchanting them with his sincerity and his hungry memory, and collecting photographs. By the time he died in 1991, at 51, he had amassed thousands of anecdotes and a million photographic images. Kobal set up a photo agency to profit from all this material, but he kept the best for himself, including original prints and negatives from such famed studio photographers as Clarence Sinclair Bull, George Hurrell, Ruth Harriet Louise, Eugene Robert Richee and Ernest Bachrach.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
"I have always said--and I still say it right out in print," wrote Louella Parsons, doyenne of Hollywood gossip columnists, in March 1929, "that one of the finest photographers I know is a woman. I speak of Ruth Harriet Louise, who has made Marion Davies, Norma Shearer and other M-G-M beauties even more beautiful." At the time, Louise was only 26 and had already been MGM's chief portrait photographer for four years.
BOOKS
July 21, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch is a contributing writer to the Book Review and the author, most recently, of "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
"Less than 5% of the artists in the Modern Art Sections are women," proclaims a poster issued by an art collective called the Guerrilla Girls in 1989, "but 85% of the nudes are female." A healthy corrective to the plight of women in the art world, however, can be found in "Art/Women/California," an impressive and illuminating survey of art by women in California during the last half of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Art Critic
A1991 photograph by John Humble shows Selma Avenue at Vine Street as a jumbled, architecturally constructed Hollywood landscape of office buildings, stores, asphalt and advertising billboards. Dominating the center is Angelyne, the cosmetically manufactured "human Barbie doll," who adorns one enormous sign. Radio host Rick Dees, then an eternally adolescent 41-year-old, graces a KIIS sign just above her bleached-blond head. Neutered Ken to Angelyne's pneumatic Barbie, he's the benign Adam to her wicked Eve in Hollywood's media-made Garden of Eden.
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