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Ruth Maleczech

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Although she's reluctant to admit it, Ruth Maleczech's reputation precedes her. "I don't really have a career," demurs the four-time Obie-winning actress, fresh from a rehearsal, as she sits down to discuss her life in art. "Careers are when you become more well known and you make more money and you can make more demands. But I do have a body of work. And that is in fact the way I think of it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Although she's reluctant to admit it, Ruth Maleczech's reputation precedes her. "I don't really have a career," demurs the four-time Obie-winning actress, fresh from a rehearsal, as she sits down to discuss her life in art. "Careers are when you become more well known and you make more money and you can make more demands. But I do have a body of work. And that is in fact the way I think of it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Summer in San Diego: "Play On!," a new musical with a book by Cheryl West ("Jar the Floor") and music by Duke Ellington, conceived by Sheldon Epps, will be the grand finale of the Old Globe Theatre's summer season, Sept. 21-Oct. 26. Also scheduled at the San Diego venue so far: "The Taming of the Shrew" (July 6-Aug. 10) and "Macbeth" (Aug. 5) in the outdoor Festival Theatre, and David Mamet's "American Buffalo" in the Cassius Carter Centre Stage July 13-Aug. 17. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The new Museum of Contemporary Art is a glorious and blessed space, and the reader with any interest in being reconciled to the art of his century needs to get up there. MOCA's first theater event, "Zangezi," is a less bountiful experience. This is director Peter Sellars' staging of a "supersaga in 20 planes" by the Russian avant-garde poet Velimir Khlebnikov (1885-1922).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
With a mop of red hair, turquoise eye shadow and a broken-tooth smile, the great Ruth Maleczech looks like a Technicolor Lucy on a binge. She plays Winnie, the nonstop chatterbox who is inexplicably buried in a hill of gravel up to her considerable decolletage, in Samuel Beckett's "Happy Days," now at the La Jolla Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Jean Genet's last play was "The Screens" (1961), a gigantic anti-epic of the Algerian Revolution. Genet's play is rarely performed anywhere, and when it is, it's usually cut. Not so in Joanne Akailitis' staging at the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis. There, "The Screens" is getting the full treatment: huge cast, lavish costumes and a 5 1/2-hour production (with an hour's break for a Moroccan supper served in the lobby).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
In 17th century Mexico City, there were no upbeat sitcoms about single women living alone in the big city. A woman had no social right to a room of her own. So the Catholic Church created Belen, a home for unmarried women without means of support. Residents weren't allowed to leave. Belen gradually became more prison-like; women were forcibly brought there. In 1860, it was turned into an actual prison that achieved considerable notoriety before it was torn down in 1935.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Cat and a Ball on a Waterfall: 200 Years of California Folk Painting and Sculpture," more than 125 works by about 55 artists, is on view at the Oakland Museum, Saturday through Aug. 3. Conceived by the museum's art department and organized by senior curator Harvey Jones and folklorist Donna Reid, the show is a broad historical survey of painting and sculpture by artists of widely differing backgrounds, all working without formal training.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I've always been plugged into the wall," Peter Sellars declared. "I love radio. It's where I live, where I come from." It's also where the Los Angeles Festival's artistic director has been spending some of his happiest creative time recently--as a contributor to "The Territory of Art," a 16-part weekly radio series sponsored by the Museum of Contemporary Art and broadcast locally on KCRW-FM (89.9). The program begins its third season today at 10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
The terrorists are the good guys in Charles Borkhuis' "Phantom Limbs," a dark comedy--with lots of light and sound effects--opening Friday at the Wallenboyd. "It's set sometime in the future in an unspecified country, where a police state has taken over" said director Michael Arabian, who recently completed an acting stint in John Patrick Shanley's "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea" at the Cast Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
JoAnne Akalaitis is a woman of many questions. "How is America now? What was the success story of the first immigrants? Has it changed? What does it mean to learn English, to be in California, to be an illegal alien, to be tortured, to get political asylum? What is political asylum?" Playwright Akalaitis--a brisk, serious woman sporting blue glasses and short, spiky hair--paused for breath.
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