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Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

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NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, a novelist and screenwriter whose long collaboration with Merchant Ivory Productions yielded two Academy Awards for her work on the films “A Room With a View” and “Howards End,” has died. She was 85. Jhabvala died early Wednesday at her home in Manhattan after a long illness, said her daughter Firoza. A prolific author, Jhabvala (pronounced JOB-vah-lah ) wrote 19 novels and short-story collections that reflected the cultures she absorbed on three continents during her half-century career.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
For years, people who read Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's novels assumed she was born in India. She wrote about swamis, social climbers, duplicitous landlords and other characters from the Indian bourgeoisie who inevitably found themselves colliding with curious visitors from the West. But Jhabvala was a Westerner herself: a German Jew displaced by war to England, who married an Indian man and settled in his country. She absorbed enough of subcontinental culture to portray it with clarity and comic sensibility in books that earned her comparisons to Jane Austen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
For years, people who read Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's novels assumed she was born in India. She wrote about swamis, social climbers, duplicitous landlords and other characters from the Indian bourgeoisie who inevitably found themselves colliding with curious visitors from the West. But Jhabvala was a Westerner herself: a German Jew displaced by war to England, who married an Indian man and settled in his country. She absorbed enough of subcontinental culture to portray it with clarity and comic sensibility in books that earned her comparisons to Jane Austen.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, a novelist and screenwriter whose long collaboration with Merchant Ivory Productions yielded two Academy Awards for her work on the films “A Room With a View” and “Howards End,” has died. She was 85. Jhabvala died early Wednesday at her home in Manhattan after a long illness, said her daughter Firoza. A prolific author, Jhabvala (pronounced JOB-vah-lah ) wrote 19 novels and short-story collections that reflected the cultures she absorbed on three continents during her half-century career.
BOOKS
July 16, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
An Oscar-winning screenwriter ("A Room With a View"), Jhabvala is also an accomplished novelist, as this witty comedy of manners demonstrates. Jhabvala's characters find themselves unready for the battle between their ancestral culture and the Westernized mores of contemporary India. The wealthy Gulzari Lal is torn between the roles of financier and paterfamilias. His son, Vishnu, affects modernity but lacks the resolve to live up to his pose.
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Merle Rubin
The daughter of Polish Jews, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala was born in Germany in 1927, went to England as a refugee in 1939, and later married an Indian architect. They lived in Delhi from 1951 to 1975, and subsequently divided their time between Delhi and New York. Against this background, which strikes the casual observer as a litany of dislocation, the distinctive identity of one of today's leading novelists and storytellers has taken unforgettable shape.
BOOKS
March 14, 1993 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's novel "Set For Life" has just been reissued in paperback. She is currently working on a book about India
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala is a writer of great vision. In her previous novels and story collections--15 books in all--she has bridged the worlds of East and West as no other writer of her generation has done, producing small masterpieces that chronicle the lives of middle-class urban Indians, displaced Europeans and spiritually obsessed Americans with equal acerbity and sensitivity.
MAGAZINE
November 28, 1993 | Michael Lassell, Michael Lassell is articles director of Metropolitan Home magazine. "The Hard Way," his new collection of prose and poetry, will be published by Masquerade Books next year
There is a photograph of Ruth Prawer Jhabvala taken at the inaugural showing of "The Householder" in 1963. Based on her fourth novel, her first film script, it became the first feature film of Bombay-born producer Ismail Merchant and his American partner and collaborator, director James Ivory.
BOOKS
October 1, 1995 | Judith Freeman, Judith Freeman's latest novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," will be published by Pantheon next spring
What a long and distinguished career Ruth Prawer Jhabvala has had as a writer. She is both prolific--having published 16 books--and profound, the winner of the Booker Prize (for her novel "Heat and Dust"), two Oscars (for "Room With a View" and "Howards End"), and the recipient of a MacArthur grant--the so-called "genius" award. She remains a rather mysterious figure, one who rarely gives interviews, does not turn up at awards ceremonies and shuns publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Words of Praise: The writers of several films expected to receive Oscar nominations this morning are among the 11 screenwriters singled out by the Writers Guild for its 45th annual awards. Nominees in the best original screenplay category are Neil Jordan ("The Crying Game"), Woody Allen ("Husbands and Wives"), George Miller and Nick Enright ("Lorenzo's Oil"), John Sayles ("Passion Fish") and David Webb Peoples ("Unforgiven").
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Richard Robbins, the composer who created memorable scores for such films as "A Room With a View," "Howards End" and "The Remains of the Day" during a quarter-century collaboration with director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, has died. He was 71. Robbins died Nov. 7 at his home in Rhinebeck, N.Y., of Parkinson's disease, said Michael Schell, his longtime partner. Robbins created the score for nearly every Merchant Ivory film from "The Europeans" in 1979 to "The White Countess" in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It's easy to see why the Merchant Ivory team was attracted to " The City of Your Final Destination," a languid literary contemplation on the vagaries of life, love, bee stings and the artistic soul. Just as easy to sense is the missing touch of Ismail Merchant, who died in 2005, nearly a year before the film went into production. Filled with unrealized possibilities and fraught with flaws, "Final Destination" seems destined to be little more than a footnote in the anthology of extraordinary films to come out of the long creative collaboration between producer Merchant, director James Ivory and screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
The current taste for reality -- or what passes for it (what could be less real than the contrived game-playing of reality TV?) -- seems to be giving the memoir a competitive edge over the novel. This, perhaps, may explain why Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's "My Nine Lives" is billed as "autobiographical fiction." By now we're all sophisticated enough to understand how much invention may go into a "true" story, and how much real-life experience may find its way into a novel.
BOOKS
October 11, 1998 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, Susan Salter Reynolds is an assistant editor of Book Review
TRIAGE. By Scott Anderson (Scribner: 240 pp., $23) Mark bugs me. He's a freelance combat photographer, one of those cowboys addicted to war zones, not one for words. Hard on girls, trades stories with other photographers over beers, wears black. Do Not Disturb sign hung around his neck. On its flip side in small letters: Please Risk Everything You Are To Try To Figure Me Out Because I Sure As Hell Can't Do It.
BOOKS
October 1, 1995 | Judith Freeman, Judith Freeman's latest novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," will be published by Pantheon next spring
What a long and distinguished career Ruth Prawer Jhabvala has had as a writer. She is both prolific--having published 16 books--and profound, the winner of the Booker Prize (for her novel "Heat and Dust"), two Oscars (for "Room With a View" and "Howards End"), and the recipient of a MacArthur grant--the so-called "genius" award. She remains a rather mysterious figure, one who rarely gives interviews, does not turn up at awards ceremonies and shuns publicity.
MAGAZINE
November 28, 1993 | Michael Lassell, Michael Lassell is articles director of Metropolitan Home magazine. "The Hard Way," his new collection of prose and poetry, will be published by Masquerade Books next year
There is a photograph of Ruth Prawer Jhabvala taken at the inaugural showing of "The Householder" in 1963. Based on her fourth novel, her first film script, it became the first feature film of Bombay-born producer Ismail Merchant and his American partner and collaborator, director James Ivory.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | ELAINE KENDALL
Three Continents by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala (Morrow: $17.95; 384 pages) A European woman educated in England and married to an Indian architect, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala writes memorable novels, stories and screenplays that often deal with cultural conflicts between East and West. "Three Continents," perhaps her most ambitious book, not only confronts these issues directly but in a more contemporary context than either "Heat and Dust" or her superb film adaptation of E. M.
BOOKS
March 14, 1993 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's novel "Set For Life" has just been reissued in paperback. She is currently working on a book about India
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala is a writer of great vision. In her previous novels and story collections--15 books in all--she has bridged the worlds of East and West as no other writer of her generation has done, producing small masterpieces that chronicle the lives of middle-class urban Indians, displaced Europeans and spiritually obsessed Americans with equal acerbity and sensitivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Words of Praise: The writers of several films expected to receive Oscar nominations this morning are among the 11 screenwriters singled out by the Writers Guild for its 45th annual awards. Nominees in the best original screenplay category are Neil Jordan ("The Crying Game"), Woody Allen ("Husbands and Wives"), George Miller and Nick Enright ("Lorenzo's Oil"), John Sayles ("Passion Fish") and David Webb Peoples ("Unforgiven").
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