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Ruth Reichl

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NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Ruth Reichl has always been fearless, as a restaurant critic, as a boss and as a friend. She'll tell you exactly what she thinks, good and bad. In an interview this weekend with the fashion website Daily Front Row , it's good to see nothing has changed. Writer Alexandra Ilyashov got the former L.A. Times and New York Times restaurant critic and former Gourmet magazine editor-in-chief to open up over lunch at Barbuto. Although, knowing Ruth, "getting her to open up" probably consisted of turning on the tape recorder and asking the right questions.
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NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
We may not have heard the last of Ruth Bourdain . When Josh Friedland, the author of the long-running Twitter parody decloaked Thursday in the New York Times , some assumed he might be hanging it up for good. In fact, Friedman himself might have assumed that. But today he's already having second thoughts. Much to the relief of tens of thousands of followers. “I'm leaving my options open,” Friedland said from his home in Maplewood, N.J. “This [decloaking] wasn't necessarily coupled with a plan to end it. On the other hand, I thought I'd just about done everything I could do with the character.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987
When the end finally comes, the only thing left will be Ruth Reichl, who is actually Irv Letofsky in drag, and all those infernal ads in Calendar! Blech !! CARLA DAVIS Los Angeles
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
There are a lot of smart people in the food world, but not many smarter than Ruth Reichl. So when she says formal fine dining is going to make a comeback, maybe it's a good idea to pay attention. Reichl was the restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times in the 1980s and '90s, then restaurant critic for the New York Times, editor of Gourmet magazine and author of a series of best-selling food memoirs. I was talking to her for a story I'm working on when she pointed out that "the people who really spend a lot of money in restaurants now are the 20-30somethings and they really think of restaurants as an important part of their lives.
FOOD
March 4, 1998
Today was a very happy day for me after reading Ruth Reichl's personal story, "Go Ask Alice" (Feb. 25). I was swept into someone else's life. It felt magical. Ms. Reichl's family history shows us how very much we need each other through the good times and the bad times. I only wish that I, too, could have dined with Aunt Birdie and Alice. NANCY TORRECILLAS Beverly Hills Ruth Reichl's article, "Go Ask Alice," was wonderful. The storytelling reminded me of M.F.K. Fisher (one of my favorite authors)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
Concerning the April 22 letters castigating the reviews of restaurants in France: They are from men who take critic Ruth Reichl seriously. She obviously is a satirist who goes to great lengths to raise the ire of we poor masculine types who pay the tab at ultra-expensive restaurants. W.E. PLUTTE Ojai
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986
After three years of suffering through Ruth Reichl, I finally can take no more of her scathing reviews of some of Los Angeles' finer restaurants. Chasen's was the last straw ("The Grump Dines Out," Dec. 21). Please grant my one Christmas wish. Bring back Lois Dwan and banish Reichl back to San Francisco. MARK TRAVIS Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1987
Hey, I think it's great that chefs are becoming involved in worthwhile social causes ("Chefs for Charity--Coast to Coast," by Ruth Reichl, June 21). Maybe they'll even have their consciousness raised in regard to eating meat--particularly the highly poached and nearly endangered black bear that comprised Jack Czarnecki's ragout. JOAN WOOLSON La Mesa
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989
Re the Santa Monica restaurant DC 3: Often we, the readers, get an experience that is wholly different from critic Ruth Reichl's ("The Romance of Dining by a Runway," Jan. 22). Is it possible that restaurateurs know her and dupe her with specially prepared food and service? DOROTHY BLASS Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1991
Your article on Santa Barbara restaurants ("Looking Up," by Ruth Reichl, Sept. 22) was quite accurate but you missed some very good and affordable restaurants that I believe your readers would enjoy. I recommend Allegro, Brigitte's, Oysters, and the Wine Cask in downtown Santa Barbara. DON JACKSON Santa Barbara
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Ruth Reichl has always been fearless, as a restaurant critic, as a boss and as a friend. She'll tell you exactly what she thinks, good and bad. In an interview this weekend with the fashion website Daily Front Row , it's good to see nothing has changed. Writer Alexandra Ilyashov got the former L.A. Times and New York Times restaurant critic and former Gourmet magazine editor-in-chief to open up over lunch at Barbuto. Although, knowing Ruth, "getting her to open up" probably consisted of turning on the tape recorder and asking the right questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2009 | Jonathan Kirsch, Kirsch is the author, most recently, of "The Grand Inquisitor's Manual: A History of Terror in the Name of God."
Ruth Reichl is a commanding and daunting figure in American culture. Beginning in the 1970s, she played a key role in revolutionizing food and restaurant journalism, wielded make-or-break influence as a restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times and later the New York Times, and continues to loom large as editor in chief of Gourmet magazine.
BOOKS
April 1, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
COMFORT ME WITH APPLES More Adventures at the Table By Ruth Reichl Random House: 302 pp., $24.95 It is not surprising that a very small number of people rise to the top of the food and journalism pyramid. First of all, as Ruth Reichl, editor of Gourmet Magazine, reveals in this memoir, no one believes it is a real job. "You're going to spend your life telling spoiled, rich people where to eat too much obscene food?"
BOOKS
April 5, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, Michael Frank is a contributing writer to Book Review
In the etiology of a heightened palate there are, as a rule, one of two formative early life experiences: either painful loss or sustained exposure to an adult with a troubled, ungenerous or finicky disposition that expresses itself in her (less often, his) culinary behavior. In contrast to these influences, a sensitive palate attached to a sensitive personality is generally on the scene as well.
FOOD
March 11, 1998
Ruth Reichl's parents' minister was Maynor, not Maynard, and he was married to the most luminous singer of her generation, Dorothy Maynor. She was short and heavy, but when she sang, you were in the presence of a giant. Although I live according to macrobiotic principles, I'm going to prepare Aunt Birdie's potato salad (we don't eat nightshade vegetables). I'm also going to buy the book when it becomes available next month. MARLY HARRIS Simi Valley I just read Ruth Reichl's article, and it was beautiful.
FOOD
March 4, 1998
Today was a very happy day for me after reading Ruth Reichl's personal story, "Go Ask Alice" (Feb. 25). I was swept into someone else's life. It felt magical. Ms. Reichl's family history shows us how very much we need each other through the good times and the bad times. I only wish that I, too, could have dined with Aunt Birdie and Alice. NANCY TORRECILLAS Beverly Hills Ruth Reichl's article, "Go Ask Alice," was wonderful. The storytelling reminded me of M.F.K. Fisher (one of my favorite authors)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985
Now wait a second! Wolfgang Puck ("The Spagoization of Manhattan," by Ruth Reichl, Dec. 8) "invented the term California Cuisine?" Somebody better check with Alice Waters of Chez Panisse. I think she taught lucky Puck everything he knows. ROOS REED Van Nuys Check yourself. There's an interview with her on Page 5.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1993
Everyone who knows food will expect that you have fired Ruth Reichl and the editors responsible for her April 4 column ("Post-Champagne"), for the appallingly typo'd name (Triosgros) of the chef at whose restaurant in Roanne she says Patrick Healy worked. Disgraceful! B. W. LEMOND Mission Viejo Reichl replies: The late Jean Troisgros, with whom I dined on several occasions, would have laughed at finding himself turned into a fat trio in print. He had the best sense of humor of anyone I've ever met.
MAGAZINE
October 11, 1992
I hope I'm never unlucky enough to be seated at a table next to Ruth Reichl when she goes out to review a restaurant ("An Indoor Outing," Sept. 13). Not only is she likely to eavesdrop on my conversation and print part of it, but at the same time she will probably criticize my choice of dessert. I thought the job of a restaurant reviewer was to critique the food and service, not to spy on the customers. SUSAN SHIELDS Santa Barbara
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