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Ruth Rosen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1993
There would be no shootout and deaths if madmen like Koresh did not have unlimited access to guns. His high-powered war arsenal is a tragic testimony to America's inadequate gun-control policy. There will be more deaths and shootouts and killings at our schools until we get meaningful gun-control legislation. RUTH ROSEN Santa Monica
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BOOKS
February 6, 2000 | SUSIE LINFIELD, Susie Linfield is a contributing writer to Book Review
Ruth Rosen's history of the post-World War II feminist movement begins and ends with quotes from poets. This is appropriate, for her book--like the best poetry--is an exploration of both reality and consciousness. She begins with Anne Sexton, a self-described "victim of the American Dream," and ends on a more hopeful note with Muriel Rukeyser. Rukeyser once asked, "What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life?" and then answered: "The world would split open."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991
In response to "Temper Tantrums Over a Dystopian Nightmare," by Ruth Rosen, Commentary, Aug. 8: Ms. Rosen's comments on Berkeley's People's Park are inappropriate. The People's Park was destroyed by Ronald Reagan. There are no liberals guilty over the park's present condition (unless they are fools). The People's Park became a vacant lot 20 years ago. It has been an eyesore ever since. NICK P. MAGINNIS Topanga Canyon
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
The ineffable professor Ruth Rosen has things upside down (and inside out), as usual ("A Physics Prof Drops a Bomb on Faux Left," Column Left, May 23), when she writes that the "cadre of Academic Emperors . . . claimed that their scholarship . . . constitute[s] a radical political movement and that they [are] the true theorists of the 'academic left.' " The case is rather that those termed "cultural theorists" and whom she thinks are exposed as jargon-ridden fools and charlatans are mostly folks of her own ilk. Indeed they are the true heirs of Rosen's "self-described progressive and feminist" left.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992
In response to Column Left, "Voter Apathy? No, More Like Voter Disgust," by Ruth Rosen, April 9: What if they gave an election and nobody came? Hmmm . . . sounds like an idea whose time may have come. I suggest a complete boycott of the coming election by everyone, and maybe voter apathy and disillusionment will be taken as seriously as it ought to be. Since it seems that Washington, right and left, will not hear what the people are screaming, then the only alternative is to withhold the one thing they can't supply themselves, our vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1992
Ruth Rosen is correct that many Americans long for a return to traditional family life (" 'Family Values' Is a GOP Code for Meanness," Column Left, April 21). As she also points out, they have plenty of cause: a 50% divorce rate, 3.5 million latchkey children, and 70,000 abandoned elderly per year. Our society has lost its center. But Rosen contemns traditional family life as a "cartoon image." And she recommends--what? More sex education and more abortion. More of the same of what got us where we are. I don't know what Rosen and the Democrats think they're defending, but it sure ain't the family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991
I read with a sense of pleasant surprise Ruth Rosen's column about the vision of "Star Trek" (Column Left, Oct. 30). She very correctly points out that we preached non-interference in the affairs of other civilizations while simultaneously practicing gunboat diplomacy. We "stood for democracy" but backed our own ideals "with weapons of mass destruction." We did preach racial equality, while doing stories about prejudice within our own ranks. And it is entirely fitting that gays and lesbians "will appear unobtrusively aboard the Enterprise--neither objects of pity nor melodramatic attention."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994
Regarding "Society Fails the Next Generation," Column Left, by Ruth Rosen (Aug. 30), there are two points I wish to raise. Prof. Rosen mentions that various women's group are helping young ladies to deal with "financial disaster, physical abuse and emotional deprivation." Since when are these problems only important to women? I always thought these issues affect all humans, male and female alike. She also says that "male counterparts still dream of Ronald Reagan's rosy-tinted mythic 1950s" and they need to "understand the economic and social changes that have transformed American society."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996
The ineffable professor Ruth Rosen has things upside down (and inside out), as usual ("A Physics Prof Drops a Bomb on Faux Left," Column Left, May 23), when she writes that the "cadre of Academic Emperors . . . claimed that their scholarship . . . constitute[s] a radical political movement and that they [are] the true theorists of the 'academic left.' " The case is rather that those termed "cultural theorists" and whom she thinks are exposed as jargon-ridden fools and charlatans are mostly folks of her own ilk. Indeed they are the true heirs of Rosen's "self-described progressive and feminist" left.
OPINION
September 15, 1991 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, writes regularly on political culture.
The doors, the authorities said, were the problem. To keep workers--most of them women--from leaving early, the foremen kept the doors locked. When fire broke out, the flames trapped the workers. When the fire trucks finally arrived, the ladders were too short. Forty-seven young women leaped to their deaths; another hundred never made it to the windows. The tragedy caused a national furor. The infamous fire occurred at the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. in New York City on March 25, 1911.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994
Regarding "Society Fails the Next Generation," Column Left, by Ruth Rosen (Aug. 30), there are two points I wish to raise. Prof. Rosen mentions that various women's group are helping young ladies to deal with "financial disaster, physical abuse and emotional deprivation." Since when are these problems only important to women? I always thought these issues affect all humans, male and female alike. She also says that "male counterparts still dream of Ronald Reagan's rosy-tinted mythic 1950s" and they need to "understand the economic and social changes that have transformed American society."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, writes regularly on political culture.
For the first time in its history, the U.S. Senate will probably try one of its members for "sexual misconduct." To be found guilty, Sen. Bob Packwood, an Oregon Republican accused of sexual harassment and assault by more than 20 women, must be found in violation of a law or of "engaging in improper conduct which may reflect upon the Senate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1993
There would be no shootout and deaths if madmen like Koresh did not have unlimited access to guns. His high-powered war arsenal is a tragic testimony to America's inadequate gun-control policy. There will be more deaths and shootouts and killings at our schools until we get meaningful gun-control legislation. RUTH ROSEN Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1992 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, writes regularly on political culture
At a press conference on Dec. 12, 1988, President Bush expressed this strong conviction: "Well, it appear (sic) to be a double standard to some, but I--that's my position, and it's--we don't have the time to philosophically discuss it here, but . . . we're going to opt on the side of life. And that is--that is the--that really is the underlying part of this for me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1992 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, writes regularly on political culture
George Bush has a character problem: He finds it hard to tell the truth. "Iraqgate," as some Democrats have dubbed the Bush Administration's deceptive and dubious pre-war policy toward Iraq, may emerge as one of the most serious moral violations of the nation's trust. The question is not whether the Reagan and Bush administrations "tilted toward Iraq" during the 1980s; that much was known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1992
Ruth Rosen is correct that many Americans long for a return to traditional family life (" 'Family Values' Is a GOP Code for Meanness," Column Left, April 21). As she also points out, they have plenty of cause: a 50% divorce rate, 3.5 million latchkey children, and 70,000 abandoned elderly per year. Our society has lost its center. But Rosen contemns traditional family life as a "cartoon image." And she recommends--what? More sex education and more abortion. More of the same of what got us where we are. I don't know what Rosen and the Democrats think they're defending, but it sure ain't the family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen is a professor of history at UC Davis. She is writing a history of American feminism
Sometimes, I tell my students, history speeds up, events spin out of control and time takes on a different dimension. Such has been the world's experience as a failed coup in the Soviet Union ignited the collapse of the Communist Party's 70-year rule over the Soviet empire. It is at such moments that the pundits and talking heads weigh in, predicting scenarios, trying to control what is, after all, the untidiness of history. It can't be done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1991 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, is writing a history of contemporary feminism and is the author of "The Lost Sisterhood: Prostitution in America."
For more than four decades, the Cold War froze political debate about what the American family needs for its well-being. Long an icon of the "pro-family" right, the family was sacrificed to the exigencies of Cold War hysteria and military overinvestment. National health care and child care smacked of enslavement--what "they" did in the East Bloc. With the end of the Cold War, we are entitled to an intellectual dividend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992
In response to Column Left, "Voter Apathy? No, More Like Voter Disgust," by Ruth Rosen, April 9: What if they gave an election and nobody came? Hmmm . . . sounds like an idea whose time may have come. I suggest a complete boycott of the coming election by everyone, and maybe voter apathy and disillusionment will be taken as seriously as it ought to be. Since it seems that Washington, right and left, will not hear what the people are screaming, then the only alternative is to withhold the one thing they can't supply themselves, our vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1992 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, writes regularly on political culture. and Paul Conrad is on vacation
Don't be surprised if the family becomes the focus of presidential politics this year. At least the Republicans know a symbol when they see one. In his State of the Union address, and then again during the Southern primaries, George Bush tried out his major campaign theme: the restoration of "family values." But to Bush, helping the family consists of demonizing welfare mothers, denouncing welfare cheats and child-support dodgers and trying to abolish abortion.
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