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Ruth Seymour

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Jennifer Ferro, assistant general manager of public radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), is expected to be named the influential station's new general manager Saturday, succeeding Ruth Seymour, who is retiring after 32 years in the position. The board of trustees of Santa Monica College, which owns KCRW's license, was expected to approve the appointment of Ferro, who will begin her new job March 1. FOR THE RECORD: An article in Saturday's Calendar section about the expected succession of Jennifer Ferro as general manager of public radio station KCRW incorrectly identified another public radio station, KPCC, as KPPC.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2012 | By Steve Carney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After 35 years in television news, Warren Olney walked away from a lucrative reporting job at the end of 1991, frustrated that the medium had become too superficial. When public radio station KCRW-FM (89.9) invited him to host a one-time show, a call-in program in the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, he didn't realize he was about to start another career. Now, two decades later, he's preparing to celebrate the 20th anniversary of "Which Way, L.A.?" and on Saturday night will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Radio & Television News Assn.
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NEWS
May 21, 1995 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Seymour is in a funk. She's half an hour late for dinner, famished, but in no mood to eat, let alone be interviewed. "Maybe this was a bad idea," she says, barely audible above the din of Hal's Bar & Grill, a favorite Venice hangout. She relents and orders a salad anyway. It's been a rough day and the woman who shaped public radio station KCRW in her own image needs time to decompress.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Jennifer Ferro, assistant general manager of public radio station KCRW-FM (89.9), is expected to be named the influential station's new general manager Saturday, succeeding Ruth Seymour, who is retiring after 32 years in the position. The board of trustees of Santa Monica College, which owns KCRW's license, was expected to approve the appointment of Ferro, who will begin her new job March 1. FOR THE RECORD: An article in Saturday's Calendar section about the expected succession of Jennifer Ferro as general manager of public radio station KCRW incorrectly identified another public radio station, KPCC, as KPPC.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | Steve Carney
When Ruth Seymour arrived as a consultant for KCRW-FM (89.9) in September 1977, the station was operating out of a building at John Adams Middle School in Santa Monica and had the oldest transmitter west of the Mississippi. "There was one typewriter, and it didn't work. If you opened the door, you were on the playground of a junior high school," Seymour said. "There was no place to go but up." Seymour helped transform KCRW from a small outlet with a weak Westside signal to the National Public Radio flagship in Southern California, broadcasting to Los Angeles, Palm Springs, and Orange and Ventura counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | James Rainey
My acquaintance with Ruth Seymour over the years had been fleeting. But inevitably when I saw the KCRW radio general manager, it would provoke reminiscences about the days long ago when I worked with her daughter, Celia, on the newspaper at Santa Monica High School. Maybe that obscure connection gave Seymour license to heap extra incredulity on me a couple of months ago. It was the last time I interviewed her, and I had deigned to ask whether, based on the latest Arbitron ratings, KCRW-FM (89.9)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2001
The cancellation of "KCRW Playhouse" made me decide not to renew my KCRW membership when it expired a couple of months ago ("Radio Drama Troupe Assails KCRW's Cancellation of 'Playhouse,' " by Elaine Dutka, July 24). I've had a love-hate relationship with KCRW for 20 years, loving "All Things Considered" and Warren Olney but hating the cancellation of music shows I cared about ("Reggae Beat," "African Beat") and the gradual morphing of the station into Yuppie Music Central. Replacing "KCRW Playhouse" with more yuppie music was the final straw for me. Ruth Seymour wants to "attract a younger audience."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2012 | By Steve Carney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After 35 years in television news, Warren Olney walked away from a lucrative reporting job at the end of 1991, frustrated that the medium had become too superficial. When public radio station KCRW-FM (89.9) invited him to host a one-time show, a call-in program in the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, he didn't realize he was about to start another career. Now, two decades later, he's preparing to celebrate the 20th anniversary of "Which Way, L.A.?" and on Saturday night will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Radio & Television News Assn.
OPINION
January 22, 1995 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times. He interviewed Ruth Seymour over bagels in Santa Monica
When the new congressional leadership announced plans to eliminate funds for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, staff and listeners of member TV and radio stations sprang into action. None faster with the editorial than Ruth Seymour, general manager of KCRW. Seymour, 59, is nothing if not feisty.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
"We killed the audience." Ruth Seymour couldn't help thinking that as the KCRW general manager faced dead phone lines during the first live broadcast of her annual Hanukkah show in 1979. Back then, KCRW-FM (89.9) was a tiny public radio station with a staff of five and a constant scramble for new programming, not the National Public Radio powerhouse it is today. The BBC Drama Service provided plenty of Christmas shows but nothing for Hanukkah, so Seymour decided to create and host her own show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | James Rainey
My acquaintance with Ruth Seymour over the years had been fleeting. But inevitably when I saw the KCRW radio general manager, it would provoke reminiscences about the days long ago when I worked with her daughter, Celia, on the newspaper at Santa Monica High School. Maybe that obscure connection gave Seymour license to heap extra incredulity on me a couple of months ago. It was the last time I interviewed her, and I had deigned to ask whether, based on the latest Arbitron ratings, KCRW-FM (89.9)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | Steve Carney
When Ruth Seymour arrived as a consultant for KCRW-FM (89.9) in September 1977, the station was operating out of a building at John Adams Middle School in Santa Monica and had the oldest transmitter west of the Mississippi. "There was one typewriter, and it didn't work. If you opened the door, you were on the playground of a junior high school," Seymour said. "There was no place to go but up." Seymour helped transform KCRW from a small outlet with a weak Westside signal to the National Public Radio flagship in Southern California, broadcasting to Los Angeles, Palm Springs, and Orange and Ventura counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
"We killed the audience." Ruth Seymour couldn't help thinking that as the KCRW general manager faced dead phone lines during the first live broadcast of her annual Hanukkah show in 1979. Back then, KCRW-FM (89.9) was a tiny public radio station with a staff of five and a constant scramble for new programming, not the National Public Radio powerhouse it is today. The BBC Drama Service provided plenty of Christmas shows but nothing for Hanukkah, so Seymour decided to create and host her own show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2001
The cancellation of "KCRW Playhouse" made me decide not to renew my KCRW membership when it expired a couple of months ago ("Radio Drama Troupe Assails KCRW's Cancellation of 'Playhouse,' " by Elaine Dutka, July 24). I've had a love-hate relationship with KCRW for 20 years, loving "All Things Considered" and Warren Olney but hating the cancellation of music shows I cared about ("Reggae Beat," "African Beat") and the gradual morphing of the station into Yuppie Music Central. Replacing "KCRW Playhouse" with more yuppie music was the final straw for me. Ruth Seymour wants to "attract a younger audience."
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Seymour is in a funk. She's half an hour late for dinner, famished, but in no mood to eat, let alone be interviewed. "Maybe this was a bad idea," she says, barely audible above the din of Hal's Bar & Grill, a favorite Venice hangout. She relents and orders a salad anyway. It's been a rough day and the woman who shaped public radio station KCRW in her own image needs time to decompress.
OPINION
January 22, 1995 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times. He interviewed Ruth Seymour over bagels in Santa Monica
When the new congressional leadership announced plans to eliminate funds for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, staff and listeners of member TV and radio stations sprang into action. None faster with the editorial than Ruth Seymour, general manager of KCRW. Seymour, 59, is nothing if not feisty.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
With Ruth Seymour's firing of Sandra Tsing Loh at KCRW-FM and now Bob Edwards' demotion at NPR's "Morning Edition" ("Stormy Days for NPR," by Allan M. Jalon and Steve Carney, March 29), it appears that public radio is running out of feet to shoot. Lon M. Burns Manhattan Beach
NEWS
May 4, 1995
Ruth Seymour, general manager of Santa Monica public radio station KCRW-FM, and two other professional women have been honored by the Jewish Federation Campaign for their achievements and dedication to the Jewish community at large. Besides Seymour, the group recognized TV and radio commentator Susan Estrich, who is also a professor of law and political science at USC, and fashion designer Judy Knapp, co-principal of Judy and Joel Knapp Corp. and Knapp Studios.
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