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Ruth Sheen

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010
Although it's called "Heartless" (for several key reasons including an especially gruesome one), this compelling psychological horror-thriller contains a tremendous amount of heart. That would be largely thanks to a moving and deeply sensitive lead performance by Jim Sturgess ("Across the Universe," "21") as Jamie, a shy East Londoner disfigured by wine-colored birthmarks and haunted by the decade-old death of his beloved father ( Timothy Spall), who lands on a nightmarish collision course with demonic forces.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
For years, the movie business has blown past older audiences. Could the breezes finally be changing direction? Hollywood is, of course, still persistently, obsessively interested in young audiences. Yet in certain quarters, at least, it's a little less about the prepubescents these days. Two of the most notable action movies of 2010 were "The Expendables" and "Red" ? films that not only prominently feature actors over 55 but that also turn characters' length of tooth into central plotlines.
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NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Sam Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Leigh's filmography is not lacking in emotionally draining high-wire performances ? Brenda Blethyn in "Secrets & Lies," David Thewlis in "Naked," Imelda Staunton in "Vera Drake," to name just a few. But there's a frayed-nerved quality to Lesley Manville's performance in Leigh's "Another Year" (opening Dec. 29) that's as raw as any of those. Manville plays Mary, an unattached middle-aged woman whose friendship with happily married co-worker Ruth Sheen grows increasingly desperate as her life falls apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Another Year" is about the turning wheel of life, an examination of the pleasures and jealousies, disappointments and insecurities, destroyed dreams and rekindled hopes that make up our daily existence. It may sound commonplace, but in the hands of master filmmaker Mike Leigh, the everyday becomes extraordinary. The film is also further proof ? if proof is necessary after six Oscar nominations for writing and directing, a Palme d'Or and a best director award from Cannes, and a Golden Lion from Venice ?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"I always have a problem giving films titles," Mike Leigh says, thinking about it. "That comes last, and this film was a real tough one, a bummer. At some stage we thought we should just call it 'Life,' but you can't call it that, it's bloody pretentious. " "Another Year" was the appropriate title eventually selected, but the truth is that Leigh's exceptional new film, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, really is about the turning wheel of life as dramatized by the hand of a master, about the pleasures and jealousies, disappointments and insecurities, destroyed dreams and rekindled hopes that make up our daily lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
For years, the movie business has blown past older audiences. Could the breezes finally be changing direction? Hollywood is, of course, still persistently, obsessively interested in young audiences. Yet in certain quarters, at least, it's a little less about the prepubescents these days. Two of the most notable action movies of 2010 were "The Expendables" and "Red" ? films that not only prominently feature actors over 55 but that also turn characters' length of tooth into central plotlines.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Best European Films Awarded: "Landscape in the Mist," a movie about two boys searching for their father, was named best film at this year's European Film Awards in Paris, better known as the Felixes. The director, Theo Angelopoulos of Greece, received the prize late Saturday as part of the second annual awards competition among film makers from 27 countries.
NEWS
January 11, 2011
Here's a look at four fascinating film matriarchs and the actresses who admire them "Lolita" (1962) The magnificent mom: Blowsy and deluded, Charlotte Haze (Shelley Winters) didn't realize she was raising the archetypical jailbait ? and lost her daughter to an obsessed older man. Seal of approval: "Shelley Winters was brilliant ? she brought a subtle edge to that role, which became both terrifying and touching. " ? Sally Hawkins ("Made in Dagenham") "Tootsie" (1982)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
True Grit Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Joel and Ethan Coen had their biggest hit with their version of Charles Portis' classic western novel. "True Grit" tells the rip-roaring story of headstrong young girl Mattie Ross (played by formidable newcomer Hailee Steinfeld) who enlists drunken lawman Rooster Cogburn (Jeff Bridges) and cocky Texas Ranger LaBoeuf (Matt Damon) to bring the man who killed her father to bloody justice. But this "True Grit" is also very Coens-y; the brothers retain Portis' flavorfully archaic language and quirky characters, all in service of a funny, thrilling and touching piece of Americana, with the visual splendor and deep weirdness that have become the Coens' trademark.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Mike Leigh's savage-sweet "High Hopes," which opens Friday at the Goldwyn Pavilion Cinema, Westside, is small in scale and lingering in impact. It's lovely the first time, even more so the second, when you've got the knack of its rhythms.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Sam Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Mike Leigh's filmography is not lacking in emotionally draining high-wire performances ? Brenda Blethyn in "Secrets & Lies," David Thewlis in "Naked," Imelda Staunton in "Vera Drake," to name just a few. But there's a frayed-nerved quality to Lesley Manville's performance in Leigh's "Another Year" (opening Dec. 29) that's as raw as any of those. Manville plays Mary, an unattached middle-aged woman whose friendship with happily married co-worker Ruth Sheen grows increasingly desperate as her life falls apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"I always have a problem giving films titles," Mike Leigh says, thinking about it. "That comes last, and this film was a real tough one, a bummer. At some stage we thought we should just call it 'Life,' but you can't call it that, it's bloody pretentious. " "Another Year" was the appropriate title eventually selected, but the truth is that Leigh's exceptional new film, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, really is about the turning wheel of life as dramatized by the hand of a master, about the pleasures and jealousies, disappointments and insecurities, destroyed dreams and rekindled hopes that make up our daily lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
More films are off-putting than not these days, but "The Young Poisoner's Handbook" is not content with that alone: It's unpleasant to no discernible purpose. Based with considerable looseness on the true crime story of a British teenager who quite methodically attempted to poison friends and family alike, "Poisoner's" pats itself on the back for telling its story from the point of view of the 14-year-old malefactor, but that is just the kind of pride that cometh before a fall.
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