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Ruth Shellhorn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
After studying landscape architecture at Cornell University in the 1930s, Ruth Shellhorn traveled home to South Pasadena on a mail boat through the Panama Canal. On her journey, she kept a meticulous diary of the exotic plants she encountered in Central and South America: bougainvillea, palm trees, birds of paradise.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
After studying landscape architecture at Cornell University in the 1930s, Ruth Shellhorn traveled home to South Pasadena on a mail boat through the Panama Canal. On her journey, she kept a meticulous diary of the exotic plants she encountered in Central and South America: bougainvillea, palm trees, birds of paradise.
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HOME & GARDEN
September 15, 2005 | Dawn Bonker, Special to The Times
JUST try to coax Ruth Shellhorn into talking about that photograph of her at the White House more than 30 years ago, accepting an award from Pat Nixon. What was the award? "I don't know," Shellhorn says. At 95, it's understandable that a few details from a career spanning seven decades might grow fuzzy.
HOME & GARDEN
September 15, 2005 | Dawn Bonker, Special to The Times
JUST try to coax Ruth Shellhorn into talking about that photograph of her at the White House more than 30 years ago, accepting an award from Pat Nixon. What was the award? "I don't know," Shellhorn says. At 95, it's understandable that a few details from a career spanning seven decades might grow fuzzy.
BOOKS
December 25, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
THERE is something sad about the stunning career of Southern California architect Wallace Neff -- like a faded photograph. Neff's work is redolent of all that Southern California dreams are made of: the white stucco walls brimming with bougainvillea, the smooth, cool ironwork on doors and windows. Why sad? Because he never quite achieved the fame and glory he felt he deserved.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"In Southern California," the architect Charles Moore wrote in 1984, "the part that is planted is very likely to be more sophisticated than the part that is built. " If that's the case — and I'd say it has been in nearly every phase of the region's design history — how to explain the fact that Los Angeles architects have for so long been much better known, locally and around the world, than their counterparts in landscape architecture? Why have our best gardens tended to be even more susceptible to neglect or demolition than our best houses, which are themselves infamously vulnerable?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"I want to show you something," says Victoria Steele, who heads UCLA's Department of Special Collections. This is her favorite phrase. The soul of discretion, her second favorite phrase is, less endearingly, "Off the record." Steele beckons over her shoulder, already receding down a long corridor. Scarves flutter. She wears pale, tasteful colors. She is very thin, pale, blond and neat. Outwardly, at least, she is not a woman given to extremes or unruly passions.
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