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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ruth Stone, a leading American poet whose career was halted, then inspired by tragedy as her sharp insights into love, death and nature brought her widespread acclaim in later years, has died. She was 96. Stone, who won the National Book Award at 87 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist at 93, died Nov. 19 of natural causes at her home in Ripton, Vt., said her daughter, Phoebe Stone. The poet was poised to publish her first book of verse, "In an Iridescent Time," in 1959 when her husband, poet and novelist Walter Stone, committed suicide by hanging at 42. Left with three daughters to raise, Ruth Stone struggled to feed her family, moving around the country to teach at a seemingly endless string of universities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ruth Stone, a leading American poet whose career was halted, then inspired by tragedy as her sharp insights into love, death and nature brought her widespread acclaim in later years, has died. She was 96. Stone, who won the National Book Award at 87 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist at 93, died Nov. 19 of natural causes at her home in Ripton, Vt., said her daughter, Phoebe Stone. The poet was poised to publish her first book of verse, "In an Iridescent Time," in 1959 when her husband, poet and novelist Walter Stone, committed suicide by hanging at 42. Left with three daughters to raise, Ruth Stone struggled to feed her family, moving around the country to teach at a seemingly endless string of universities.
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BOOKS
March 12, 2000
Here is not exactly here because it passed by there two seconds ago; where it will not come back. Although you adjust to this-- it's nothing, you say, just the way it is. How poor we are, with all this running through our fingers. "Here," says the Devil, "Eat. It's Paradise." * From "Ordinary Words" by Ruth Stone (Paris Press: 80 pp., $19.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2003
Last year was a good one for 87-year-old Vermont poet Ruth Stone. In November, she won the National Book Award for her book "In the Next Galaxy," and as the year ended, she received the $150,000 Wallace Stevens Prize from the Academy of American Poets in recognition of her mastery of poetry. "A poet looks at the world / as a woman looks at a man," she writes in the poem "Words," turning a famous Wallace Stevens line on its head (and, in the process, reclaiming the world for herself).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996
Along with 300,000 other Easter vacationers I was at the San Ysidro border when my car radiator and I both began hemorrhaging. We were able to get to the Revolucion Monument circle in Tijuana before the car died completely. No taxi would take me. The American consulate could not help. A senior Tijuana police officer dispatched a patrol to us. My two companions and I were stuffed into the rear cell of the police car. With flashing lights and siren, we raced back to the door of U.S. Immigration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2003
Last year was a good one for 87-year-old Vermont poet Ruth Stone. In November, she won the National Book Award for her book "In the Next Galaxy," and as the year ended, she received the $150,000 Wallace Stevens Prize from the Academy of American Poets in recognition of her mastery of poetry. "A poet looks at the world / as a woman looks at a man," she writes in the poem "Words," turning a famous Wallace Stevens line on its head (and, in the process, reclaiming the world for herself).
REAL ESTATE
November 24, 1985
Kathy Wiener, president of Country Oaks Escrow Inc., Newhall, has been reelected president of the Escrow Institute of California. Urda French, Sherrill Ladd and Ruth Stone have been elected to three-year terms on the board of directors, which then reelected Debbi Faber president-elect and elected Liz Aguilar vice president and Sandra Bayrd treasurer. No secretary was named. New one-year directors are Bayrd, Edith Johnson and Carol Howell.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2002 | From Reuters
Robert Caro on Wednesday won the National Book Award for "Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson," his third book on the life of the late president. Caro, who is working on a fourth and his intended last book on Johnson, said in a statement read at the National Book Foundation award ceremony here that people often ask if he gets bored spending so much time on one person. "I consider each of my four books studies on political power, how it is acquired and how it is used," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | Renee Tawa, Times Staff Writer
Her mind is whirligig-ing again, and, within the space of a few minutes, 49-year-old Harryette Mullen has recited lines from a Lord Byron poem and a Wynonie Harris jump blues song and a hand-clapping chant that she remembers from her childhood in Texas.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | BOB SEAVEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The melodic strains of a Hoagy Carmichael tune and the rhythmic chants of a near-forgotten Indian tribe mix surprisingly well at Indiana University. Workers at the Archives of Traditional Music say their collection of sound--with some recordings nearly a century old--is probably the largest of its kind in the United States, outside the Library of Congress. The facility focuses on ethnographic sound, recordings made at the site of an event rather than at a studio.
BOOKS
March 12, 2000
Here is not exactly here because it passed by there two seconds ago; where it will not come back. Although you adjust to this-- it's nothing, you say, just the way it is. How poor we are, with all this running through our fingers. "Here," says the Devil, "Eat. It's Paradise." * From "Ordinary Words" by Ruth Stone (Paris Press: 80 pp., $19.95)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996
Along with 300,000 other Easter vacationers I was at the San Ysidro border when my car radiator and I both began hemorrhaging. We were able to get to the Revolucion Monument circle in Tijuana before the car died completely. No taxi would take me. The American consulate could not help. A senior Tijuana police officer dispatched a patrol to us. My two companions and I were stuffed into the rear cell of the police car. With flashing lights and siren, we raced back to the door of U.S. Immigration.
BOOKS
September 1, 2002 | CAROL MUSKE-DUKES
SWAN ELECTRIC Poems By April Bernard W.W. Norton: 88 pp., $22 April Bernard's new book, "Swan Electric," is juiced up but runs ultimately on a current of sweet melancholy. The swan is a time-honored literary symbol, plugged in and re-powered here like an electric company's neon sign. The first section of the book offers an impressive array of sonnets that the author calls disheveled, but they are rather finely groomed: lyrical, colloquial, original. The sonnets set the tone for the entire book.
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